GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH https://www.gsi.de/ GSI RSS-Feed de-de TYPO3 News Wed, 17 Aug 2022 13:04:31 +0200 Wed, 17 Aug 2022 13:04:31 +0200 TYPO3 EXT:news news-5389 Tue, 16 Aug 2022 08:27:00 +0200 Long sought-after particle consisting of four neutrons discovered https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5389&cHash=e121560022fad7ef8a7931174c0c61cb An international research team with participation by the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung succeeded for the first time to create an isolated four-neutron system with low relative energy in a volume corresponding to that of an atomic nucleus. The scientists have overcome the experimental challenge by employing a new method. This news is based on a press release of the Technical University Darmstadt.

An international research team with participation by the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung succeeded for the first time to create an isolated four-neutron system with low relative energy in a volume corresponding to that of an atomic nucleus. The scientists have overcome the experimental challenge by employing a new method.

The experiment has been carried out at the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory RIBF at RIKEN (Japan) by a large international research team led by Technical University Darmstadt. Significantly involved besides GSI were scientists from TU Munich and the RIKEN Nishina Center. The experiment yielded an unambiguous signal for the first observation of the tetraneutron. The result has been published in the current issue of “Nature”.

The building blocks of atomic nuclei are nucleons, which exist as two kinds, the neutral neutrons and the charged protons, representing the two isospin states of the nucleon. To our present knowledge, nuclei made of neutrons only are not existing as bound nuclei. The only bound systems known made of almost only neutrons are neutron stars, which are very compact high-density objects in the universe bound by the gravitational force with typical radii of around 10 kilometers. Atomic nuclei are bound by the nuclear strong force with a preference to balance neutrons and protons, as known for the light stable nuclei we find on earth.

Better understanding of neutron-star properties

The study of pure neutron systems is of particular importance since they provide the only means to extract experimental information on the interaction among several neutrons and thereby on the nuclear force. If multi-neutron systems do exist as resonances or even bound states has been a long-standing quest in nuclear physics. The exploration of the so far hypothetical particles might furthermore provide information helping for a better understanding of neutron-star properties. If multi-neutron systems do exist as unbound resonant states or even bound states has been a long-standing quest in nuclear physics. The research team set out to undertake a new attempt by using a different experimental technique as compared to previous attempts. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) via the SFB 1245.

“This experimental break-through provides a benchmark to test the nuclear force with a pure system made of neutrons only", says Dr. Meytal Duer from Institute for Nuclear Physics at the TU Darmstadt. “The nuclear interaction among more than two neutrons could not be tested so far, and theoretical predictions yield a wide scatter concerning the energy and width of a possible tetraneutron state. We are currently planning to a next-generation experiment at R3B at FAIR, which will detect directly the correlations among the four neutrons with the R3B NeuLAND detector, which will give deeper insight to the nature of this four-neutron system”.

The experimental study of pure neutron systems is challenging because targets — which are the matter samples subject to the particle beam — solely made of neutrons do not exist. In order to create multi-neutron systems in a volume where the neutrons can interact via the short-range nuclear force (few femto-meter, 10-15 meter), nuclear reactions have to be used. Here, the interaction of the neutrons with other particles involved in the reaction process poses a major problem, which can mask the properties of the pure neutron interaction. The scientists have overcome this problem by using a high-energy 8He beam. The 8He consists of a compact alpha particle (4He) which is surrounded by the additional four neutrons in a cloud of lower density. The alpha particle is removed from 8He in a high-energy reaction instantaneously, induced by a proton of the liquid hydrogen target. The remaining four neutrons are suddenly free and can form a four-neutron state.

“Key for the successful observation of the tetraneutron was the chosen reaction, which isolates the four neutrons in a fast (compared to the nuclear scale) process, and the chosen kinematics of large momentum-transfer, which separates the neutrons from the charged particles in momentum space”, says Professor Dr. Thomas Aumann, head of the research department “Nuclear Reactions” at GSI/FAIR and a professor at the Institute for Nuclear Physics of TU Darmstadt. “The extreme kinematics resulted in an almost background-free measurement. We now plan to employ the same reaction in an 6He experiment at the RIBF to make a precision measurement of the low-energy neutron-neutron interaction. A dedicated neutron detector for this experiment is currently being built at our university”. (TUDa/CP)

Further information
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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5402 Mon, 08 Aug 2022 10:40:53 +0200 "Tour der Hoffnung": GSI/FAIR participates in charity event for children with cancer https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5402&cHash=40db5d81f1047ecebb22c2a12cae1be4 GSI/FAIR is actively involved in the charity cycling event "Tour der Hoffnung" for the benefit of children suffering from cancer and leukemia. When the nationwide known fundraising event stops at the Bürgermeister-Pohl-Haus in Wixhausen on August 12, 2022 at 3 p.m., representatives of GSI/FAIR and the Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy with Heavy Ions will be there. They will inform about cancer therapy with ions and the current state of research, as well as about the activities of the associat GSI/FAIR is actively involved in the charity cycling event "Tour der Hoffnung" for the benefit of children suffering from cancer and leukemia. When the nationwide known fundraising event stops at the Bürgermeister-Pohl-Haus in Wixhausen on August 12, 2022 at 3 p.m., representatives of GSI/FAIR and the Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy with Heavy Ions will be there. They will inform about cancer therapy with ions and the current state of research, as well as about the activities of the association.

GSI is the birthplace of a new form of cancer treatment. This development was the result of many years of research in conjunction with GSI’s large ion-beam accelerator system. To date, ion-beam radiotherapy has been used to treat more than 440 patients for tumors in the head or neck region. The advantage of this new treatment modality is that the ion beam selectively damages tumor tissues while sparing the surrounding healthy tissues. Further research will focus on applying the new treatment method to other malignant tumors as well. An ion-beam radiotherapy center was constructed at the Heidelberg University Medical Center under the technical direction of GSI. Since its opening in November 2009 patients can be treated in clinical routine operation.

The Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy is closely linked to GSI/FAIR and supports activities for the research in the field of tumor therapy with heavy ions by providing nonmaterial and financial support. The major aims are further improvements of the tumor treatment and awarding these in the framework of the Christoph-Schmelzer-Award. The association pursues exclusively and directly charitable purposes.

The "Tour der Hoffnung" is one of the largest, privately organized charity cycling tours, which has raised more than 42 million euros in the past 38 years, the organizers say. They emphasize, "All donations go to the last cent for the benefit of those affected, while the organizational costs are borne by sponsors. This clear separation has been enormously well received nationwide. This is an important reason why every year many celebrities from business, politics, show business and sports put themselves at the service of the good cause."

This year, around 160 participants, including well-known athletes, will be pedaling to raise funds for children with cancer. The 254-kilometer charity bike tour traditionally begins on August 11 with a prologue in and around Giessen and ends on August 13 in Fulda. This year's patron of the tour is once again Petra Behle, Olympic champion and nine-time world champion in biathlon. The captain of the field of riders is Klaus Peter Thaler, a multiple cross-country world champion from Gevelsberg. (BP)

Further information

Ion-beam radiotherapy in the fight against cancer at GSI/FAIR

Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy with Heavy Ions

Tour der Hoffnung (in German)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5400 Thu, 04 Aug 2022 09:00:00 +0200 Weapon against tumors, boost for the immune system: Activating X-rays – Signalling cascade in T-cells https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5400&cHash=60543f8d2c2dcd5b1fd33d09a16f9671 Radiation therapy is a proven approach to destroying tumours. However, it is possible that it might be able to do even more in the future – namely stimulate the immune system at the same time and so fight cancer even more intensively. Researchers led by TU Darmstadt and with participation of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung have found that x-rays trigger a calcium signalling cascade in cells of the immune system. The results have now been published in the “Journal of General Physiology”. This news is based on an press release of the TU Darmstadt

Radiation therapy is a proven approach to destroying tumours. However, it is possible that it might be able to do even more in the future – namely stimulate the immune system at the same time and so fight cancer even more intensively. Researchers led by TU Darmstadt and with participation of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung have found that x-rays trigger a calcium signalling cascade in cells of the immune system. The results have now been published in the “Journal of General Physiology”.

Ionising radiation is successfully used in cancer treatment to kill tumor cells and is an important research topic of the GSI Biophysics Department. Over the past two decades, it has become clear that treatment success can be increased even further if the radiation treatment is combined with measures to stimulate the immune system. In this context, a new study being carried out with researchers from TU Darmstadt and GSI plus researchers from the clinics of the Frankfurt and Homburg universities is attracting attention.

The researchers report in the Journal of General Physiology that the desired stimulating effect on the immune system is triggered directly when T-cells are also irradiated by x-rays. Dominique Tandl, researcher at the Department of Biology at TU Darmstadt, and her co-authors, also including Claudia Fournier and Burkhard Jakob from GSI, demonstrate in the recently published study that clinically relevant doses of x-rays in T lymphocytes trigger a signalling cascade that is typical of the immune reaction that begins with the release of the messenger substance calcium (Ca2+) from internal stores.

Activated by what is known as store operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), the concentration of Ca2+ in the cells begins to oscillate at a critical frequency, which in turn leads to the displacement (translocation) of a transcription factor from the cytoplasm into the cell nucleus. Once there, this transcription factor initiates gene expression, and the cell begins to make molecules that are important for the immune response, such as cytokines.

Since the irradiation of tumours invariably always affects the blood cells in the target tissue, medicine could utilise the stimulating effect of x-rays on T lymphocytes. The researchers hope that their studies will contribute to improving cancer treatment in the long term, as Professor Gerhard Thiel, head of the Membrane Biophysics Department at the Department of Biology at TU Darmstadt and co-author of the study, says. “It could be possible to enhance the killing effect of ionising radiation on tumour cells and at the same time to stimulate the immune system with the help of this radiation.” (TUDa/BP)

Further information

Press release of the TU Darmstadt

Scientific publication in "Journal of General Physiology“

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5398 Mon, 01 Aug 2022 08:21:51 +0200 Award at the World Media Festival for FAIR drone video https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5398&cHash=fc5b397970734eb72a276551c5856beb Award: The "Longterm Dronelapse 2018-2021", with which GSI/FAIR document the progress of four years on the FAIR construction site, was awarded the "Intermedia Globe SILVER Award" by the World Media Festival. 270 participants from 40 nations took part in the film competition. Award: The "Longterm Dronelapse 2018-2021", with which GSI/FAIR document the progress of four years on the FAIR construction site, was awarded the "Intermedia Globe SILVER Award" by the World Media Festival. 270 participants from 40 nations took part in the film competition.

The sophisticated and creative film technique convinced the jury: The time-lapse video produced by GSI/FAIR to show the developments on the construction site of the particle accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) was judged as an outstanding contribution in the category "Public Relations/Research and Science". The jury of the "WorldMediaFestivals | Television & Corporate Media Awards" honored the video with the "Intermedia Globe SILVER Award". 

The progress made on one of the largest construction sites for basic research worldwide is made particularly visible with the special GPS filming and processing technique of the "Longterm Dronelapse". Lars Möller from the interdisciplinary media production company "Zeitrausch" from Breuberg regularly flies the same routes over the FAIR construction site with a drone. The moving time-lapse videos filmed in the process are then combined into a single video. Time-lapse videos which have now been recorded over four years are superimposed in the World Media Festival award-winning video thanks to GPS support, so that the developments of the construction activities can be experienced in an impressive way. Last year's Longterm Dronelapse, which shows the development from 2018 to 2020, already won an award at the World Media Festival.

For 22 years, WorldMediaFestivals have been honoring excellence in television, corporate film, online and print at an international level. The awards are, according to intermedia, internationally recognized as a symbol of the highest production standards and one of the world's highest honors in visual competition. The jury decides based on creativity and effectiveness. (LW) 

More Information

Award-winning drone video Longterm Dronelapse

List of award-winning entries World Media Festival
 

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FAIR News (ENG) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5396 Tue, 26 Jul 2022 11:22:29 +0200 Mourning for Element Discoverer Sigurd Hofmann https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5396&cHash=df764b267dc4664dfd00f9d4492c6460 GSI and FAIR mourn the loss of one of their most prominent scientists. Prof. Dr. Sigurd Hofmann, one of the world leaders in the discovery of new elements, passed away on June 17, 2022 at the age of 78. During his time as head of the Heavy Elements Department, he succeeded in discovering the elements darmstadtium, roentgenium and copernicium. In the years before, he made significant contributions to the synthesis of the elements hassium, bohrium, and meitnerium. Equally remarkable in his scientific life is the discovery of proton radioactivity, which was achieved at the SHIP experimental setup in 1981.

Sigurd Hofmann was born on February 15, 1944 in Böhmisch-Kamnitz, Bohemia and came to Groß-Umstadt (near Darmstadt) shortly after the end of the second world war. He went to school there and attended the Max Planck High School until 1963. He then began studying physics at the former TH Darmstadt (now TU Darmstadt), where he received his diploma in 1969 and his doctorate in 1974 with Egbert Kankeleit. His scientific work, which he then began at GSI in Darmstadt, occupied him for almost 50 years. Most recently, he worked on a book on the current state of worldwide heavy element research and on the publication of a method for energy calibration of semiconductor detectors, which he had already developed in the 1990s - accuracy and scientific exactness were always important to him. After joining GSI in 1974, he devoted himself to investigating fusion reactions and radioactive decays in the group of Peter Armbruster and worked together with Gottfried Münzenberg. Sigurd Hofmann achieved international fame through the discovery of proton radioactivity from the ground state of lutetium-151 in 1981, a previously unknown decay mechanism. When analyzing the data, he benefited from his pronounced thoroughness and scientific curiosity.

At the same time, Sigurd Hofmann had begun work on the synthesis, unambiguous identification and study of the properties of the heaviest chemical elements, which were to shape his further scientific life. The first highlights were the synthesis of the new elements bohrium (Bh, Z=107), hassium (Hs, Z=108) and meitnerium (Mt, Z=109) in the years 1981 to 1984, with which GSI for the first time – and at the same time very prominently ¬¬– entered the international stage of this renowned research field. The semiconductor detectors, that Sigurd Hofmann had developed specifically for these experiments, were crucial here. Far ahead of its time, such detectors are now used worldwide to search for new chemical elements. At the end of the 1990s, Sigurd Hofmann took over the management of the heavy element group and - after instrumental improvements at the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC, the velocity filter SHIP, further detectors as well as the detection electronics – he crowned his scientific success with the discovery of the chemical elements darmstadtium (Ds, Z=110), roentgenium ( Rg, Z=111) and copernicium (Cn, Z=112) in the years 1994 to 1996. The concept "SHIP-2000", a strategy paper developed under his leadership in 1999 for long-term heavy element research at GSI, is today still current. In 2009 he was appointed Helmholtz Professor and from then onwards he was able to devote himself entirely to scientific work again. For many years he maintained a very intensive collaboration and scientific exchange with his international colleagues in Dubna, where he co-discovered element flerovium (Fl, Z=114) in a joint experiment.

For his outstanding research work and findings, he received a large number of renowned awards and prizes, of which only the most important ones can be mentioned here. Since 1996 he has been an honorary doctor of the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics at Comenius University in Bratislava (Slovakia), since 1998 honorary professor at Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, since 2001 Dr. h.c. of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna and since 2004 Professor Laureate of the Josef Buchmann Foundation of the Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. In 1984 he received the Physics Prize of the German Physical Society (together with Gottfried Münzenberg, Willibrord Reisdorf and Karl-Heinz Schmidt), in 1996 the Otto Hahn Prize of the City of Frankfurt am Main (together with Gottfried Münzenberg), in 1997 the G.N. Flerov Prize of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna and in 1998 the SUN-AMCO Medal of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics; in 2011 he received the Nicolaus Copernicus Medal of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw (Poland) and in 2011 the Medal of the City of Toruń and Nicolaus Copernicus University of Toruń (Poland).

Sigurd Hofmann was a diligent writer and speaker. He has been invited to speak at countless international conferences, authored a large number of review articles, books and book chapters, many widely cited publications etc. He also liked to present scientific results at public events, including as "Confessing Heiner" in the “Darmstadt Ziegelhütte” event location. In doing so, he was able to develop a thrilling picture of modern physics, but also of the big questions of cosmology and element synthesis in stars; he was also able to convey very clearly to the public how atoms can be made "visible".

Many chapters of his contemporary scientific life are recorded in his 2002 book “On Beyond Uranium”. His modesty and friendly nature were remarkable. You could always rely on him. His care, accuracy and deliberateness in all work was outstanding. His persistence was one of the foundations for the groundbreaking scientific achievements he achieved for GSI. He was always in the office or at the experiment, even late in the evening and on weekends, so that you could ask him at any time and always got detailed answers and competent advice. There was practically nothing in nuclear physics or GSI that he didn't know.

We are pleased that we have been able to work with an excellent scientist and colleague as well as an outstanding teacher and great person for so many years. Now we mourn Sigurd Hofmann. Our deepest sympathy goes out to his family. We will remember him fondly. (JL)
 

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Presse Aktuelles
news-5393 Wed, 20 Jul 2022 14:50:53 +0200 Young chemistry enthusiasts visit GSI/FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5393&cHash=59f0f4ff0544eb76519f3610bd21fb73 A visit to GSI and FAIR marked the end of an excursion lasting several days for young people in grades 8 to 10. The 35 students from Hesse, Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg are participants of the national Chemistry Olympiad of the middle school and had qualified in a multi-stage selection process for the third round of the competition "Chemie – die stimmt!”.

The guests were welcomed by Jutta Leroudier from the Public Relations Department and Thomas Neff from the Theory Department, who was also a participant in the Chemistry Olympiad more than 30 years ago. After an introductory presentation on past research successes, current experiments and the status of the FAIR project, the program included a tour of the construction site platform and various research facilities. “It is a unique opportunity for the young people enthusiastic about chemistry to experience the large experiments and particle accelerators of GSI/FAIR, on site, to get an impression of the dimension of the experiments and to experience the discovery site of six chemical elements,” Marco Dörsam, the organizer of the excursion and state representative of the competition, was pleased.

After the official program of the visit, things got exciting for the young people once again. The team of supervisors around Marco Dörsam announced the winners of the individual competition categories. During the excursion, the students completed a theoretical exam and conducted comprehensive experiments in small groups. During this selection process, a total of ten young people qualified for the national final in Leipzig in September. “From now on, the excursion to GSI/FAIR will be a fixed program item in the 3rd selection round of the chemistry competition and we are happy that with GSI/FAIR we can offer such an excellent venue for our young people who are enthusiastic about chemistry,” says Marco Dörsam. (JL)

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Aktuelles
news-5391 Wed, 20 Jul 2022 14:41:57 +0200 FAIR Control Center time capsule installed https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5391&cHash=c72dcb93949cd5e382767bfc52d3a0e0 The FAIR Control Center (FCC) time capsule was moved to its final location concreted into the foundation of the future Main Control Room (MCR). Inside are the building plans, the notice of approval, an excerpt from the Hessian budget, an article about the war of aggression of Russia with a peace dove attached, a pennant of the city of Darmstadt, several historical photos, and an issue of a daily newspaper from the day of the symbolic laying of the foundation stone. The documents about the building and things typical of the time are thus preserved and documented for future generations.

The symbolic laying of the foundation stone took place on March 29, 2022 with high representatives from politics, science and the building industry. Among others, the Federal Minister of Education and Research Bettina Stark-Watzinger, the Hessian Minister of Higher Education, Research, Science and the Arts Angela Dorn, the Hessian Minister of Finance Michael Boddenberg, and the Lord Mayor of the Science City of Darmstadt Jochen Partsch took part in the ceremony. 

In the meantime, the structural work continues to take shape. The foundations of the MCR have been completed, the floor slab has been concreted and work on the basement ceiling has been finalized. The walls on the ground floor, where meeting rooms and offices for accelerator operations will be located in the future, have largely been built. Parallel to the structural work, the elevator system was commissioned. Upcoming tenders for roof sealing and metal construction work as well as for technical building equipment are currently being prepared and will be awarded in the near future.

When completed, the FAIR Control Center will be a crucial hub for the entire infrastructure on the GSI/FAIR campus. In the future, all accelerators of the GSI/FAIR facilities will be controlled from there. In addition to the MCR, the building will house around 200 office workstations, meeting rooms and a visitors' gallery. After its completion, the five-story building with a partial basement will have a total gross floor area of around 6000 square meters. (JL)

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Aktuelles
news-5387 Mon, 18 Jul 2022 09:27:00 +0200 Secretary General of the CDU Hesse Manfred Pentz visits GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5387&cHash=6ced465a5ac75b887345f547750fab78 Manfred Pentz, Secretary General of the CDU Hesse and Member of the State Parliament, recently visited GSI and FAIR to learn about the progress of the FAIR project and the current scientific activities. The guests were received by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR as well as Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Press and Public Relations of GSI and... Manfred Pentz, Secretary General of the CDU Hesse and Member of the State Parliament, recently visited GSI and FAIR to learn about the progress of the FAIR project and the current scientific activities. The guests were received by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR as well as Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Press and Public Relations of GSI and FAIR and other GSI/FAIR staff. 

After an introductory presentation on the status of the FAIR project, campus development, previous research successes and current experiments, the guests visited the FAIR construction site. The tour took them to the underground SIS100 accelerator tunnel and the CBM experiment, both of which have completed shell construction, and the transfer building, which forms the central hub of the facility beamline. A stop at the shell construction area of the Super-FRS, which will sort exotic particles, and the future NUSTAR experiment area rounded off the comprehensive picture of the future international research facility. (LW)

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FAIR News (ENG) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5385 Thu, 14 Jul 2022 07:34:00 +0200 Marco Durante elected president of PTCOG https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5385&cHash=5f3d322f5c794055af6afe7a7fdb487f Professor Marco Durante, head of the Biophysics Research Department at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, has been elected president of the Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group (PTCOG). The international organization is active worldwide to promote particle therapy — tumor therapy with particle beams, as developed, among others, at GSI— and thus improve overall treatment options for cancer. Professor Marco Durante, head of the Biophysics Research Department at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, has been elected president of the Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group (PTCOG). The international organization is active worldwide to promote particle therapy — tumor therapy with particle beams, as developed, among others, at GSI— and thus improve overall treatment options for cancer.

Durante was elected president by the PTCOG Steering Committee, to which each clinical particle therapy center in the world sends representatives. The handover of the presidency took place during the recent PTCOG60 conference in Miami, USA. With Durante, for the first time a representative from Germany and also from research is appointed as president, after the position was previously held mainly by physicians or clinical medical physicists. As president, he will chair the PTCOG Governing Board.

“The appointment is a great honor for me and I am very grateful to fill this position for the next three years,” Durante said on the occasion of the election. “During my term, I would like to advocate for more focus on research within PTCOG. It is essential in order to further optimize particle therapy, which is already very successful as a therapy method and also gentle to the patients, and to make it available for additional conditions.”

The goal of particle therapy is to destroy tumor cells while sparing surrounding healthy cells. Accelerated ions are better suited for this purpose than the conventionally used X-rays. They unfold their damaging effect at the end of their trajectory at a certain depth. This groundbreaking tumor therapy was developed at GSI's large accelerator facility. With great success, more than 440 people with tumors in the head and neck region have been treated with ion beams there in the past. At the existing research facility, as well as in the future with the FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) accelerator facility currently under construction in Darmstadt, researchers are working to improve the method through new technologies and treatment procedures.

PTCOG, founded in 1985, is a global non-profit organization of researchers and professionals in the field of radiation therapy with protons, light ions, and heavy charged particles. Its mission is to promote the science, technology, and practical clinical application of particle therapy with the goal of improving treatment of cancer methods to the highest possible standard in radiation therapy. To accomplish its objectives, PTCOG encourages education in the field and promotes other global activities, such as international conferences and meetings.

Marco Durante is head of the GSI Biophysics Research Department and professor at the TU Darmstadt Department of Physics, Institute of Condensed Matter of Physics. He studied physics and got his PhD at the University Federico II in Italy. His post doc positions took him to the NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas and to the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. During his studies, he specialized in charged particle therapy, cosmic radiation, radiation cytogenetics and radiation biophysics. He has received numerous awards for his research, including the Galileo Galilei prize from the European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (EFOMP), the Timoffeeff-Ressovsky award of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), the Warren Sinclair award of the US National Council of Radiation Protection (NCRP), the IBA-­Europhysics Prize of the European Physical Society (EPS), the Bacq & Alexander award of the European Radiation Research Society (ERRS) and the Failla Award of the Radiation Research Society. Additionally, he has been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant of the European Union for the continuation of his research activities. (CP)

Further information
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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5383 Tue, 05 Jul 2022 09:14:49 +0200 Artist-in-Science-Residence — Culture meets science https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5383&cHash=ec3c22160fcc5d2ad2f814f35a1ac979 Darmstadt is not only a science city, but can also look back on more than 175 years of history of art production and promotion. What could be more obvious than combining these two important traditions? In the "Artist-in-Science-Residence" program, the association Kultur einer Digitalstadt and the three science institutes in Darmstadt, GSI/FAIR, ESOC and hessian.AI, bring art and science together in a way that is unique in Germany. Darmstadt is not only a science city, but can also look back on more than 175 years of history of art production and promotion. What could be more obvious than combining these two important traditions? In the "Artist-in-Science-Residence" program, the association Kultur einer Digitalstadt and the three science institutes in Darmstadt, GSI/FAIR, ESOC and hessian.AI, bring art and science together in a way that is unique in Germany.

From July 25 to September 2, the Italian artist Luca Spano will come to Darmstadt and, together with researchers from GSI and FAIR, will deal with the limits of vision and the visible. He investigates the perception of reality and the process by which we construct knowledge. “We produce images from data, we use our cultural background to imagine the unreachable, we create our beliefs,” says Luca Spano. “Every time we invent technology that changes how or what we can see, we change ourselves and the world around us.”

With the Artist-in-Science-Residence, GSI/FAIR establishes an interdisciplinary dialogue between artists and physicists, which offers the opportunity to pursue artistic questions and to reflect on them in a scientific context. From the artistic dialogue and in experimental workshops with the public and our scientists, images will be generated of what cannot be seen with the naked eye: the building blocks of matter and antimatter and their interactions. (KG/BP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5377 Thu, 30 Jun 2022 08:16:00 +0200 GSI/FAIR and Japanese research center RIKEN sign agreement on joint research in nuclear physics https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5377&cHash=b3acfa82ce86d2ac863e08afb032bb50 On June 12, a ceremony was held on the joint campus of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research (GSI) and the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) to commemorate the signing of an agreement on collaborative research (Memorandum of Understanding) in the area of nuclear physics. The agreement was made between the Japanese RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR), GSI and FAIR. This news is based on a press release by RIKEN CPR.

On June 12, a ceremony was held on the joint campus of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research (GSI) and the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) to commemorate the signing of an agreement on collaborative research (Memorandum of Understanding) in the area of nuclear physics. The agreement was made between the Japanese RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR), GSI and FAIR.

Chief Scientist Professor Takehiko Saito of RIKEN CPR has had ongoing collaboration with GSI/FAIR, and it was decided to take this partnership further with the establishment of a joint laboratory. The joint laboratory will be headed by Saito and Professor Christoph Scheidenberger of GSI/FAIR, with the aim of promoting collaborative research and expanding exchanges of researchers, including students.

The agreement also provides for the establishment of new research collaboration between RIKEN and GSI/FAIR, which will be carried out by researchers from three CPR laboratories, the Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics Laboratory led by Professor Toshiyuki Azuma, the Meson Science Laboratory led by Professor Masahiko Iwasaki, and the High Energy Nuclear Physics Laboratory led by Takehiko Saito.

The agreement was signed both on-site at GSI/FAIR and online. From GSI and FAIR’s side, Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, participated. From RIKEN’s side, Dr. Shigeo Koyasu, Director of CPR  participated. Additionally, Dr. Keitaro Ohno, State Minister for Cabinet Affairs in charge of Science and Technology Policy and Economic Security, visited GSI and FAIR on the same day and witnessed the signing, expressing his strong support for the cooperative relationship.

“Japanese research institutions in general and RIKEN in particular are strong and very valuable partners for GSI and FAIR. The cooperation with Japan’s highly qualified scientists has been extremely fruitful for us, as demonstrated by the many successful collaborations and research achievements, in the past and in the ongoing FAIR Phase 0 experiments. Many joint projects have been carried on by our scientists both in Japan and here. We hope for an intensified continuation in the future for which the signing of today’s agreement will pave the way”, says Professor Paolo Giubellino.

„Building on the previous joint activities between CPR and GSI, we hope that the signing of this MoU will further advance the collaboration,” added Dr. Shigeo Koyasu. (RIKEN/CP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5381 Mon, 27 Jun 2022 08:25:00 +0200 PANDA Collaboration honors PhD: Theory Prize for Dr. Bai-Long Hoid https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5381&cHash=005477621e4aae65d625477a42f9086e During their recent meeting, the PANDA Collaboration has announced for the third time its PANDA Theory PhD Prize. Every other year outstanding PhD theses of young scientists are honored with this prize. The year 2022 prize was handed over to Dr. Bai-Long Hoid for his PhD thesis “Taming Hadronic Effects at the Precision Frontier: From the Muon Anomaly to Rare Decays” by Professor Ulrich Wiedner, spokesperson of the PANDA Collaboration, Professor Karin Schönning, deputy spokesperson, and ... During their recent meeting, the PANDA Collaboration has announced for the third time its PANDA Theory PhD Prize. Every other year outstanding PhD theses of young scientists are honored with this prize. The year 2022 prize was handed over to Dr. Bai-Long Hoid for his PhD thesis “Taming Hadronic Effects at the Precision Frontier: From the Muon Anomaly to Rare Decays” by Professor Ulrich Wiedner, spokesperson of the PANDA Collaboration, Professor Karin Schönning, deputy spokesperson, and Professor Christian Fischer, chair of the Theory Advisory Group, in a dinner ceremony.

In his work, which was conducted under the supervision of Privatdozent Bastian Kubis at the University Bonn, Dr. Bai-Long Hoid studied the dominating theoretical uncertainties regarding the prediction of the muon anomalous moment, which are limited by calculations of hadronic vacuum polarization and hadronic light-by-light scattering.

Dr. Bai-Long Hoid successfully addressed a very complex problem and significantly advanced the theoretical tools that are required to carry out high-precision calculations for the relevant hadronic quantities in this low-energy regime. His scientific publications have received high recognition in the theory community and beyond.

The PANDA Collaboration bestowes PhD Prizes to specifically honor students’ contributions related to the PANDA project. Candidates for the PhD Prize are nominated by their doctoral advisors. In addition to being directly related to the PANDA experiment, the nominees’ doctoral degrees must have received a grade of “very good” or better. Up to three candidates are shortlisted for the award and can present their dissertations at the PANDA Collaboration Meeting. The winner is chosen by a committee that is appointed for this task by the PANDA Collaboration. (CP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5379 Wed, 22 Jun 2022 08:07:00 +0200 Japanese Minister Dr. Keitaro Ohno visits GSI/FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5379&cHash=624a328ab72bf0fe3d5b09b64bf9250c [Translate to English:] Vor Kurzem hatte GSI/FAIR die Ehre, eine japanische Delegation unter Führung von Dr. Keitaro Ohno, dem Staatsminister für Kabinettsangelegenheiten, zu empfangen. Die Gäste besuchten GSI/FAIR, um sich über die Forschung auf dem Campus, die von japanischen Forschenden geleiteten Experimente und das Bauprojekt für den internationalen Teilchenbeschleuniger FAIR zu informieren. Des Weiteren nahmen sie an der Unterzeichnung einer Zusammenarbeitsvereinbarung (Memorandum of Understanding) mit dem japanischen ... Recently, GSI/FAIR were honored to receive a Japanese delegation headed by Dr. Keitaro Ohno, Minister of State for Cabinet Affairs. The guests visited to learn about research on campus, experiments lead by Japanese scientists, and the construction project for the international particle accelerator FAIR. They also witnessed the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding with the RIKEN science center.

Following a welcome and an introductory talk about GSI/FAIR by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Ohno was then given an insight into the research facilities and infrastructure. In particular, existing collaborations with Japanese research institutions and ongoing experiments lead by Japanese scientists played a major role. The minister had the opportunity to meet many of the Japanese researchers currently working at GSI/FAIR.

In the Green IT Cube computing center, which is particularly energy-efficient due to its innovative water-cooling system for the computer racks, he learned about high-performance computing, experiment simulations, data analysis and sustainable computing. Afterwards, he visited the WASA experiment setup at the existing GSI fragment separator, which was installed and commissioned in cooperation with Japanese scientists during the recent months on the occasion of current measurements within the FAIR Phase 0 experiments. At the Experimental Storage Ring ESR, he learned more about atomic physics research headed by Japanese researchers in the framework of the ILIMA collaboration at FAIR.

On a bus tour of the construction site and a walk-through of the SIS100 accelerator tunnel, Ohno also was informed about the FAIR project and the progress of construction. Finally, in a joint video conference with the RIKEN research center, a Memorandum of Understanding was signed between RIKEN, GSI and FAIR in the presence of the Minister. (CP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5372 Mon, 20 Jun 2022 11:00:00 +0200 New cooperation between GSI/FAIR, Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen and Varian aims to further advance radiation therapy https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5372&cHash=38784d5e494c202f5c928c614d2dbcf6 It is an important step to extend future treatment methods in the fight against cancer: The GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, the Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM) and Varian, a Siemens Healthineers company from Palo Alto, California, intend to jointly advance medical-technical developments in the field of FLASH therapy and further pave the way to clinical application. To this purpose, an agreement was concluded among the three collaborators. It is an important step to extend future treatment methods in the fight against cancer: The GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, the Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM) and Varian, a Siemens Healthineers company from Palo Alto, California, intend to jointly advance medical-technical developments in the field of FLASH therapy and further pave the way to clinical application. To this purpose, an agreement was concluded among the three collaborators.

The collaboration aims to allow the use of the latest technologies for patient radiation at ultra-high FLASH dose rates. The topic of FLASH radiation currently is in strong focus worldwide and is also a main research topic within GSI’s Biophysics Department, headed by Professor Marco Durante. The FLASH method is a new highly promising radiation experimental therapy method. The word “flash” refers to lightning. Fitting to that, in radiation medicine, this means ultra-short and high radiation. Traditional radiation therapy, as well as proton or ion therapy, deliver doses of radiation to a patient over a period of one minute or longer, whereas FLASH radiations are used to be delivered in just a few hundred milliseconds or even shorter. In the future, FLASH may potentially reduce side effects in healthy tissues and thus increase the therapeutic window. The benefit of FLASH radiation has been significantly demonstrated in many preclinical studies, especially for electron beam radiation. However, the promising effect is not yet fully understood from a radiobiological perspective.

To perform such FLASH radiation – that is, to apply a high dose in a very short time –, the clinical accelerators must be operated at the highest intensity level to provide the necessary dose rate. However, there is a crucial hurdle to overcome: particle therapy usually uses raster scanning, a method of radiation in which the beams are precisely modulated in intensity and guided exactly over the tumor using fast magnets, a technology developed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum in the 1990s. In addition, the energy is varied at the same time, because how deep the beam enters the tissue depends on the respective energy of the beam. With this method, the tumor volume can be treated in a tailored manner and with millimeter precision. However, this procedure is not possible for FLASH radiation due to time constraints; multi-energy raster scanning would take much too long. This is where the current research by GSI/FAIR, THM and Varian comes in.

The collaborators are focusing on FLASH therapy with protons. The aim of the cooperation is the development and validation of a new clinical workflow. Instead of raster scanning with approximately 30 to 60 different energy steps, only one single energy step is used. To ensure that the radiation can nevertheless be adapted to the tumor volume, a so-called patient-specific 3D range modulator ("3D-RM") is used to achieve a comparable result – but in a much shorter time in the millisecond range. This relatively compact 3D-RM, produced with high-quality 3D printers and optimized for the particular tumor shape consists of many pyramid-shaped basic structures, each with a microscopically well-defined contour. The range modulator is produced individually for each patient and is placed upstream in the beamline before the particles reach the body. This enables the desired tumor-adapted distribution of the dose. In the coming two years, the research team will work with Varian on establishing and optimizing this process scientifically and technically.

Dr. Uli Weber, Technical Project Manager from GSI Biophysics, is very happy about the new cooperation with Varian. "What matters most to me is to bring the new modulator technology into clinical use. And here Varian is the ideal collaborator because they are the world market leader in radiotherapy and, once it can be used safely, want to continue to test FLASH in clinical trials with selected institutions as early as possible.”

Together with the scientific-technical side, GSI’s Technology Transfer staff unit, headed by Dr. Tobias Engert, also developed the new cooperation. The goal is to ensure that the innovative ideas and technologies generated at GSI/FAIR can also be transferred into applications. For this purpose, the unit bundles all competencies and support services relevant to technology transfer. In the current cooperation between GSI, THM and Varian, Technology Transfer Manager Dr. Alicja Surowiec is responsible for this administrative project coordination, Dr. Uli Weber and Dr. Christoph Schuy for the scientific project coordination and project implementation at GSI.

On the part of the University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Germany (THM), the working group of Prof. Klemens Zink is responsible for the project. Already in the last 5 years, he has worked together with his PhD students and with Dr. Uli Weber from GSI on the further development and practical implementation of the idea of the range modulator and is now pleased that these ideas are finding their way into clinical application. In this context, the work of his doctoral student Yuri Simeonov, who has developed the principles for the clinical use of the modulator and has already received several awards for his work, deserves special mention.

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Dr. Paolo Giubellino, was highly delighted by the new cooperation: "We are very proud to further advance radiotherapy together with such a globally renowned company as Varian. This international agreement builds a bridge between research institution, university and industry, enabling an extremely fruitful cooperation of powerful allies. Promoting this technology transfer bridge from fundamental science to industry is one of our fundamental missions as a research institution. Here, expertise in biophysics and medicine as well as engineering excellence come together in a promising way. New applications in tumor therapy are one of the research areas that can particularly benefit from the recently increased beam intensities of the GSI accelerators and from the unmatched beam intensities at the FAIR facility currently under construction." (BP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5375 Wed, 15 Jun 2022 13:55:00 +0200 Cooperation Agreement between GSI and the Worms University of Applied Sciences https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5375&cHash=e0cb7c07f521d8a0cb72995f05e399e1 The newly concluded cooperation agreement between the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Worms University of Applied Sciences opens up two new branches of cooperation. Opportunities for innovation through cooperative collaboration have been identified for both the Business Computing and the Logistics Management degree programs. This news is based on a press release by the Worms University of Applied Sciences.

The newly concluded cooperation agreement between the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Worms University of Applied Sciences opens up two new branches of cooperation. Opportunities for innovation through cooperative collaboration have been identified for both the Business Computing and the Logistics Management degree programs.

The common goal of the contract partners is the expansion of dual study opportunities. The involved parties are optimistic to promote knowledge transfer in the areas of dual bachelor degree programs in business computing and logistics management in the near future. The target group consists of people who usually have little work experience yet and want to combine study and practice. However, it is also about fresh ideas from a generation that is very familiar with innovative technology and can provide completely new impulses.

“Our computer science and logistics courses are currently in high demand among young people and can be made more application-oriented through the cooperation with the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, theory and practice can be even better interlinked,” Prof. Dr. Jens Hermsdorf, President of Worms University of Applied Sciences, is pleased to say.

“Networking with the local universities is an important factor for us in order to sustainably attract young talent in science, but also in the area of application. The two dual courses of study together with Worms University of Applied Sciences are a new building block that expands our existing portfolio and opens up further training opportunities for young people,” says Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR.

A cooperation with perspective and many facets

Both contractual partners strive for a trustful cooperation and are excited about these promising opportunities. “I consider the GSI Helmholtzzentrum particularly interesting as a partner, since it conducts fundamental research, and I look forward to training the future business computing specialists who will later support this important research via the IT and process side,” adds Professor Marie-Luise Sessler from the Department of Computer Science.

“Securing the recruitment and development of young professionals, especially in the IT sector as well as in logistics, is of great importance to us — the positive experiences with dual students and the tight job market among the graduates of these two fields of study are motivation for this cooperation in the Rhine-Hesse region,” explains Dorothee Sommer, head of the GSI human resources department. “For the management of our major project FAIR, the competences of both disciplines are a key for success.”

During the initiation to the cooperation, special thanks go to the GSI Human Resources Department for the excellent organization and to the coordinator for dual study programs at the University of Worms, Seyit Tokmak.

About GSI/FAIR: The GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt operates a world unique accelerator facility for ions. Some of the best-known results are the discovery of six new chemical elements and the development of a new type of cancer therapy. The new international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), one of the largest research projects worldwide, is currently under construction at GSI. At FAIR, matter that usually only exists in the depth of space will be produced in a lab for research. Scientists from all over the world will use the facility for experiments to gain new insights about the building blocks of matter and the evolution of the universe, from the Big Bang to the present. They will also develop new applications in medicine and technology. (Hochschule Worms/CP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5362 Mon, 13 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0200 Member of the Bundestag Andreas Larem visits GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5362&cHash=3551a0f2fa79e9a77547c1c928e43e37 Member of the Bundestag Andreas Larem recently visited GSI and FAIR. In a personal meeting, Prof. Dr. Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director GSI and FAIR, and Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Public Relations GSI and FAIR, presented the status of the FAIR project, the campus development as well as the research successes and the current experiments. Member of the Bundestag Andreas Larem recently visited GSI and FAIR. In a personal meeting, Prof. Dr. Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director GSI and FAIR, and Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Public Relations GSI and FAIR, presented the status of the FAIR project, the campus development as well as the research successes and the current experiments.

Accompanied by Prof. Dr. Giubellino und Dr. Peter, Dr. Harald Hagelskamp, FAIR Site Manager, led Mr Larem, directly elected member of the Bundestag for the district of Darmstadt since 2021, and his scientific assistant at the constituency office, Annika Zecher, to the FAIR construction site. Via bus, they got an overview of the activities in the northern and southern construction areas.

While taking a tour through the underground ring tunnel for the future ring accelerator SIS100 and the CBM experimental cave, which are both completed in shell construction, as well as of the transfer building, the central hub of the facility's beamline, the guests were able to gain a direct impression for future research on our campus. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5370 Thu, 09 Jun 2022 11:00:00 +0200 Industry meets cutting-edge research: Data centers are the focus of the Expert Summit 2022 at GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5370&cHash=e106a1ac39b6350904c8e2882b813699 Current developments and new strategies for future data center operations were the focus of the Data Center Expert Summit 2022, the expert conference for data centers in Germany, held recently at GSI/FAIR. It was organized by the eco Association of the Internet Industry in cooperation with GSI/FAIR's Technology Transfer Department. The event was also attended by the State Secretary in the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Development and CIO of the Federal State of Hesse, Patrick Burghardt, who gav Current developments and new strategies for future data center operations were the focus of the Data Center Expert Summit 2022, the expert conference for data centers in Germany, held recently at GSI/FAIR. It was organized by the eco Association of the Internet Industry in cooperation with GSI/FAIR's Technology Transfer Department. The event was also attended by the State Secretary in the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Development and CIO of the Federal State of Hesse, Patrick Burghardt, who gave the keynote speech of the conference and was welcomed by the GSI/FAIR management.

The Summit was opened by Professor Dr. Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, and Alexander Rabe from the Eco Association of the Internet Industry. Numerous operators, planners and customers of data centers and server rooms came together to exchange ideas on forward-looking topics and to network with important players in the sector. Various strategy and technology sessions were offered to the internet industry.

The GSI/FAIR research campus in Darmstadt is an ideal location for an event on data centers: The high-performance data center Green IT Cube of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is one of the most powerful scientific data centers in the world. It will provide enormous computing capacities for experiments at the accelerator facilities of GSI and, in the future, FAIR. The GSI/FAIR Digital Open Lab has also been established at the Green IT Cube. In this living lab (Test Data Center), computing and storage systems can be optimally tuned to an efficient cooling system with the respective application-specific requirements for performance capabilities, temporal load distributions and the like, and in different operating modes and system configurations.

The Digital Open Lab (Test Data Center) is available for industry and research partners. The offer to private and public partners includes, for example, the provision of the infrastructure and IT competences of GSI and FAIR for joint development around the topics of HPC, Big Data and ultra-fast data acquisition, including software developments and products. Access to HPC systems and projects for external partners via collaboration projects is also possible, as is an offer of services in the data center, such as the provision of rack space. The AI innovation lab currently being set up at the Hessian Center for Artificial Intelligence hessian.AI will be located at the Green IT Cube with its AI computing infrastructure. This was announced recently by the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Innovation.

At the Data Center Expert Summit 2022, Dr. Helmut Kreiser, head of the Green IT Cube, reported on the special features of the Green IT Cube and the Digital Open Lab. He explained how energy-efficient the data center is and what tasks it performs on the GSI/FAIR campus. It sets standards in IT technology and energy saving: Thanks to a special cooling system, it is particularly energy and cost efficient. The Green IT Cube cools its computers with an innovative air and water method. As a result, the energy required for cooling is less than seven percent of the electrical power used for computing, instead of 30 up to 100 percent, as is the case in conventional data centers with air-cooling. The high-performance concept has already won several awards for innovation and environmental friendliness, including the Blue Angel eco-label of the German government. (BP)

Statements on the Data Center Expert Summit 2022

Professor Dr. Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director GSI and FAIR: “We are delighted that this important data center conference with its top-class guests takes place at our facility. The Green IT Cube high-performance computing center is an outstanding example of how innovative, broadly usable developments and new cutting-edge technologies evolve out of basic research. It is an important goal for us to work together with partners from industry and business to provide new impulses for promising research and development projects”.

Patrick Burghardt, State Secretary in the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Development and CIO of the Federal State of Hesse: “High-performance computing capacities are the basis for innovative projects and products: whether in industry, agriculture, healthcare, energy supply or mobility. Data centers are the spine of digitization. Together with gigabit-capable networks and high-performance mobile networks, they provide the infrastructure and the foundation for digital transformation. Because we are aware of this, we have dedicated a separate target to data centers in the Hessian Digital Strategy. We want to strengthen the high-performance data infrastructures in Hesse and develop them into a pioneer in the field of energy-efficient, sustainable data centers and green IT, so that the Hessian data ecosystem can develop its enormous application potential in a fruitful way. With the Hessian Data Center Office and in contact with the data center operators and the municipalities we want to contribute to ensuring that innovative sustainable solutions secure the progress and future of Hesse as a business location”.

Further Information

High-performance computing center Green IT Cube

GSI/FAIR Digital Open Lab

eco Association of the Internet Industry

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5368 Wed, 08 Jun 2022 17:00:00 +0200 New insights into neutron star matter — Combining heavy-ion experiments, astrophysical observations, and nuclear theory https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5368&cHash=c5e4306014f53cca12900154bfc79c7e An international research team, including researchers from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, has for the first time combined data from heavy-ion experiments, gravitational wave measurements and other astronomical observations using advanced theoretical modelling to more precisely constrain the properties of nuclear matter as it can be found in the interior of neutron stars. The results were published in the journal “Nature”. This news is based on a press release of Technical University Darmstadt.

An international research team, including researchers from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, has for the first time combined data from heavy-ion experiments, gravitational wave measurements  and other astronomical observations using advanced theoretical modelling to more precisely constrain the properties of nuclear matter as it can be found in the interior of neutron stars. The results were published in the journal “Nature”.

Throughout the Universe, neutron stars are born in supernova explosions that mark the end of the life of massive stars. Sometimes neutron stars are bound in binary systems and will eventually collide with each other. These high-energy, astrophysical phenomena feature such extreme conditions that they produce most of the heavy elements, such as silver and gold. Consequently, neutron stars and their collisions are unique laboratories to study the properties of matter at densities far beyond the densities inside atomic nuclei. Heavy-ion collision experiments conducted with particle accelerators are a complementary way to produce and probe matter at high densities and under extreme conditions.

“Combining knowledge from nuclear theory, nuclear experiment, and astrophysical observations is essential to shedding light on the properties of neutron-rich matter over the entire density range probed in neutron stars,” said Sabrina Huth, Institute for Nuclear Physics at Technical University Darmstadt, who is one of the lead authors of the publication. Peter T. H. Pang, another lead author from the Institute for Gravitational and Subatomic Physics (GRASP), Utrecht University, added, “We find that constraints from collisions of gold ions with particle accelerators show a remarkable consistency with astrophysical observations even though they are obtained with completely different methods.”

Recent progress in multi-messenger astronomy allowed the international research team, involving researchers from Germany, the Netherlands, the US, and Sweden to gain new insights to the fundamental interactions at play in nuclear matter. In an interdisciplinary effort, the researchers included information obtained in heavy-ion collisions into a framework combining astronomical observations of electromagnetic signals, measurements of gravitational waves, and high-performance astrophysics computations with theoretical nuclear physics calculations. Their systematic study combines all these individual disciplines for the first time, pointing to a higher pressure at intermediate densities in neutron stars.

The authors incorporated the information from gold-ion collision experiments performed at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt as well as at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the USA in their multi-step procedure that analyses constraints from nuclear theory and astrophysical observations, including neutron star mass measurements through radio observations, information from the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission on the International Space Station (ISS), and multi-messenger observations of binary neutron star mergers.

Including data of heavy-ion collisions in the analyses has enabled additional constraints in the density region where nuclear theory and astrophysical observations are less sensitive. This has helped to provide a more complete understanding of dense matter. "In the future, improved constraints from heavy-ion collisions can play an important role to bridge nuclear theory and astrophysical observations by providing complementary information," said Dr. Arnaud Le Fèvre, co-author from GSI.

Especially experiments that probe higher densities while reducing the experimental uncertainties have great potential to provide new constraints for neutron star properties. New information on either side can easily be included in the framework to further improve the understanding of dense matter in the coming years. “In particular, the experiment for Compressed Baryonic Matter CBM at the new FAIR facility will play a significant role and contribute new insights,” explains Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR. “CBM will provide unique opportunities to produce and study nuclear matter at densities comparable to those in the interior of neutron stars or in neutron star mergers.” The international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) is currently under construction at GSI. (TUD/CP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5365 Fri, 03 Jun 2022 08:53:00 +0200 GET_INvolved Programme brings IIT Roorkee and GSI/FAIR closer in research collaboration and capacity building https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5365&cHash=97a631dc402630af2bd7689992300eb3 A Memorandum of Understanding and a GET_INvolved Partnership agreement which focuses on mobility and capacity building were executed between Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee India and GSI/FAIR Darmstadt Germany. The proposed trilateral agreement will enable internship, training and research programs between GSI/FAIR and IIT Roorkee, envisioned to create opportunities for collaborations between the institutes. FAIR is one of the largest research projects worldwide, being built at the GSI ... A Memorandum of Understanding and a GET_INvolved Partnership agreement which focuses on mobility and capacity building were executed between Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee India and GSI/FAIR Darmstadt Germany. The proposed trilateral agreement will enable internship, training and research programs between GSI/FAIR and IIT Roorkee, envisioned to create opportunities for collaborations between the institutes. FAIR is one of the largest research projects worldwide, being built at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung.

Specifically, a co-funding mechanism for the GET_INvolved Programme at GSI/FAIR will be established, which aims to offer young students and early-stage researchers a unique opportunity to learn and experience first-hand-work in all areas of the laboratory through technical or scientific projects related to research at GSI/FAIR.

Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee is celebrating its 175 years of imparting technical education and contributing to the development of several countries. The current agreement is also a milestone for IIT Roorkee because this is 100th agreement.

Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI und FAIR, says: “FAIR and GSI are proud to be a talent factory and India is one of FAIR's founding members, so I am delighted to see the formalization of the collaboration between IIT Roorkee and FAIR/GSI. The GET_INvolved Programme partnership with IIT Roorkee will be another step forward towards providing young students with access to first-hand training and fostering the growth of early-stage researchers, which is a fundamental element of our mission.”

Professor Ajit K Chaturvedi, Director IIT Roorkee, says: “The collaboration between GSI/FAIR and IIT Roorkee will accelerate knowledge sharing and capacity building between the two countries. The formalization of our agreement could not have taken place at a more opportune time than during the visit of our Prime Minister to Germany. I wish all the success to the GET_Involved program which has a great potential as a platform for our students and faculty members across various disciplines to utilize and contribute to the state-of-the-art international facility.” (BP)

India at FAIR

IIndia as the third-largest contributor among the countries that are working as partners to build this facility has major roles to play. Indian companies will supply and design critical items such as ultra-stable power converters, co-axial power cables for powering the magnets, beam stoppers, ultra-high vacuum chambers and superconducting magnets for the FAIR accelerator system. Indian scientists are also working on the CBM and NUSTAR experiments. In CBM, the major responsibility of Indian scientists is to build a Muon detection system based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. In the NUSTAR experiment, Indians are involved in building a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer (DESPEC Germanium Array) and Modular Neutron Spectrometer. BOSE Institute is representing the Republic of India at the Council of FAIR Shareholders.

Further information

For more information on the GET_INvolved Programme between IIT Roorkee and GSI/FAIR interested persons may contact the respective Programme coordinators: Professor P. Arumugam (IIT Roorkee, dean.ir@iitr.ac.in) and Dr. Pradeep Ghosh (GSI and FAIR, Pradeep.Ghosh@fair-center.eu).

About GET_INvolved Programme

The GET-INvolved-Programm provides international students and early-stage researchers from partner institutions with opportunities to perform internships, traineeships and early-stage research experience to get involved in the international FAIR accelerator project while receiving scientific and technical training.

 

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5360 Mon, 23 May 2022 12:11:48 +0200 Worldwide coordinated search for dark matter – Sensor network GNOME publishes comprehensive data in Nature Physics for the first time https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5360&cHash=95385e1dd82d3e731ac70af191c14f83 For the first time, comprehensive data on the search for dark matter using a global network of optical magnetometers has been published by an international group of scientists with key participation from the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM). According to the scientists, dark matter fields should produce a characteristic signal pattern that can be detected by correlated measurements at multiple stations of the GNOME network. This news is based on a press release by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

For the first time, comprehensive data on the search for dark matter using a global network of optical magnetometers has been published by an international group of scientists with key participation from the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM). According to the scientists, dark matter fields should produce a characteristic signal pattern that can be detected by correlated measurements at multiple stations of the GNOME network. Analysis of data from a one-month continuous GNOME operation has not yet yielded a corresponding indication. However, the measurement allows to formulate precise predictions of the characteristics of dark matter, as the researchers report in the prestigious journal Nature Physics.

GNOME stands for Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic physics searches. Behind it are optical magnetometers distributed around the world. With GNOME, the researchers particularly want to advance the search for dark matter – one of the most exciting challenges of fundamental physics in the 21st century. After all, it has long been known that many puzzling astronomical observations, such as the rotation speed of stars in galaxies or the spectrum of the cosmic background radiation, can best be explained by dark matter.

“Extremely light bosonic particles are considered one of the most promising candidates for dark matter today. These include so-called axion-like particles – ALPs for short,” says Prof. Dr. Dmitry Budker, professor at PRISMA+ and at HIM, an institutional collaboration of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. “They can also be considered as a classical field oscillating with a certain frequency. A possible theoretically predicted peculiarity of such bosonic fields is that they can form patterns and structures. As a result, the density of dark matter could be concentrated in many different regions – discrete domain walls smaller than a galaxy but much larger than Earth could form, for example.”

“If such a wall encounters the Earth, it is gradually detected by the GNOME network and can cause transient characteristic signal patterns in the magnetometers,” explained Dr. Arne Wickenbrock, one of the study's co-authors. “Even more, the signals are correlated with each other in certain ways – depending on how fast the wall is moving and when it reaches each location.”

The network meanwhile consists of 14 magnetometers distributed over eight countries worldwide: in Germany, Serbia, Poland, Israel, South Korea, China, Australia and the United States. Nine of them provided data for the current analysis. The measurement principle is based on an interaction of dark matter with the nuclear spins of the atoms in the magnetometer. The atoms are excited with a laser at a specific frequency, orienting the nuclear spins in one direction. A potential dark matter field can disturb this direction, which is measurable.

Figuratively speaking, one can imagine that the atoms in the magnetometer initially dance around in confusion, clarifies Hector Masia-Roig, a doctoral student in the Budker group and also an author of the current study. “When they ‘hear’ the right frequency of laser light, they all spin together. Dark matter particles can throw the dancing atoms out of balance. We can measure this perturbation very precisely.” Now the network of magnetometers becomes important: When the Earth moves through a spatially limited wall of dark matter, the dancing atoms in all stations are gradually disturbed – one of these stations is located in a laboratory at the Helmholtz Institute in Mainz. “Only when we match the signals from all the stations can we assess what triggered the disturbance,” says Hector Masia-Roig. “Applied to the image of the dancing atoms, this means: If we compare the measurement results from all the stations, we can decide whether it was just one brave dancer dancing out of line or actually a global dark matter disturbance.”

In the current study, the research team analyzes data from a one-month continuous operation of GNOME – statistically significant signals do not appear in the investigated mass range from one femtoelectronvolt (feV) to 100,000 feV. Conversely, this means that the researchers can narrow down the range in which such signals could theoretically be found even further than before. For scenarios that rely on discrete dark matter walls, this is an important result – “even though we have not yet been able to detect such a domain wall with our global search,” says Joseph Smiga, another PhD student in Mainz and author of the study.

Future work of the GNOME collaboration will focus on improving both the magnetometers themselves and the data analysis. In particular, continuous operation should be even more stable. This is important to reliably search for signals that last longer than an hour. In addition, the alkali atoms previously used in the magnetometers are to be replaced by noble gases. Under the title Advanced GNOME, the researchers expect this to result in considerably better sensitivity for future measurements in the search for ALPs and dark matter. (JGU/BP)

Further information

 Link to publication in Nature Physics

Group of Professor Budker

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5357 Wed, 18 May 2022 09:00:00 +0200 GSI/FAIR and Saint Mary's University collaborate in the GET_INvolved Programme https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5357&cHash=48d2b153bde96c2c1c2b4a1d88b50c06 GSI and FAIR in Darmstadt and the Saint Mary's University (SMU) in Halifax, Canada, have signed a mobility program contract to promote academic and research collaboration between the two institutions. The representatives of GSI/FAIR and Saint Mary's University met virtually to ink their commitment to promote exchange and training opportunities for young students and early-stage researchers. GSI and FAIR in Darmstadt and the Saint Mary's University (SMU) in Halifax, Canada, have signed a mobility program contract to promote academic and research collaboration between the two institutions. The representatives of GSI/FAIR and Saint Mary's University met virtually to ink their commitment to promote exchange and training opportunities for young students and early-stage researchers.

Dr. Robert Summerby-Murray (President and Vice-Chancellor), Dr. Malcolm Butler (Vice-President, Academic and Research), Dr. Adam Sarty (Associate Vice-President, Research), Dr. Lori Francis (Dean of Science), Dr. Ian Short (Chairperson) and Dr. Rituparna Kanungo (Astronomy and Physics Department) represented SMU Halifax. Professor Paolo Giubellino (Scientific Managing Director, Professor Karlheinz Langanke (Research Director), Professor Christoph Scheidenberger (Head of NUSTAR Department) and Dr. Pradeep Ghosh (Program Manager) represented GSI and FAIR.

The aim was also to outline the progress of the civil construction and the achievements of the FAIR's precursor program FAIR Phase 0 and exchange how the scientific collaboration can be ramped up and offer more training and research possibilities to young researchers affiliated with SMU Halifax. During the meeting, Professor Paolo Giubellino introduced the FAIR facility and the current status of the civil construction through an extraordinary time-lapse drone video of the construction site from 2018-2021 to distinguished guests from SMU Halifax in the meeting.

Professor Giubellino said, “We at GSI/FAIR are providing the opportunities for young minds to develop their talent, to get acquainted with advanced technologies and to get trained in an international environment so that they are ready to have an impact to the society at large. Science is made by the people, by brains. Our mission is to give them the opportunities to blossom. I am looking forward to welcome young scientists from SMU Halifax at FAIR”.

Professor Scheidenberger said, “For many years, SMU Halifax, GSI Darmstadt, and TRIUMF Vancouver have had closely aligned research priorities in the fields of nuclear reactions, nuclear structure and accelerator sciences. I’m pleased to learn that SMU Halifax and GSI/FAIR are formalizing their ongoing collaboration and expanding possibilities for mobility in research. The GET_INvolved Partnership agreement will offer more avenues, allowing future leaders to receive more skilled training”.

Dr. Summerby-Murray said, “This new partnership between Saint Mary’s University and our colleagues at GSI/FAIR represents our shared commitment to international research and collaboration. As scholars, we are linked by our desire to create knowledge, to explore frontiers and to demonstrate the significance of discovery and innovation to civil society. Our partnership is built around these shared values and our acknowledgement of the importance of providing opportunities for early-career researchers. Together, we are investing not only in advancing scientific inquiry but in the success of future scholars. I offer my congratulations to everyone involved in the launch of this important collaboration”. (BP)

Further informationen

For more information on the GET_INvolved Programme, interested persons can contact the respective coordinators: Dr. Pradeep Ghosh (GSI and FAIR, Pradeep.Ghosh@fair-center.eu) and Professor Rituparna Kanungo (Saint Mary’s University, ritu@triumf.ca, Rituparna.Kanungo@smu.ca).

About Saint Mary’s University

Saint Mary's University located in Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada was founded in 1802 and is a national leader in international and intercultural education. The mission statements of the university include engaging in research and serving the community from the local to the international level. The university is a hub of subatomic physics research in Atlantic Canada. The university’s present nuclear physics research infrastructure is housed at Canada’s particle accelerator center TRIUMF in Vancouver.

About GET_INvolved Programme

The GET-INvolved-Programme provides international students and early-stage researchers from partner institutions with opportunities to perform internships, traineeships and early-stage research experience to get involved in the international FAIR accelerator project while receiving scientific and technical training.

 

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5353 Mon, 16 May 2022 10:20:00 +0200 GSI/FAIR directors visit WASA detector setup at the fragment separator FRS https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5353&cHash=b9fc09ddb2ebf684007b065ec1ca3929 “It is very impressive to see how such a large collaboration of international scientists works together and I am impressed by the great scientific achievements”, says Professor Paolo Giubellino, the Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR. Together with his colleagues Jörg Blaurock and Dr. Ulrich Breuer, the Technical Managing Director and the Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, he visited the WASA detector, which is presently installed at the GSI fragment separator FRS, a few days ... “It is very impressive to see how such a large collaboration of international scientists works together and I am impressed by the great scientific achievements”, says Professor Paolo Giubellino, the Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR. Together with his colleagues Jörg Blaurock and Dr. Ulrich Breuer, the Technical Managing Director and the Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, he visited the WASA detector, which is presently installed at the GSI fragment separator FRS, a few days after the successful commissioning of the experiment in February and March 2022. All three directors wanted to obtain first-hand information of this milestone experiment and get a direct impression of the ongoing work and its first results.

In the meantime, several experiments have been performed successfully to search for and study very special exotic atoms, especially mesic atoms and hypernuclei. The experiments build on a long-standing and intense collaboration between GSI and RIKEN, Japan's largest comprehensive research institution renowned for high-quality research in a wide range of modern scientific disciplines.

Regular atomic nuclei are made of protons and neutrons, which in turn are composed of a total of three up and down quarks. They form the nucleus and, together with the surrounding electrons, an atom. If one of the quarks in the nucleus is replaced by another type, a so-called strange quark, a hypernucleus is formed. Hypernuclei can be produced in energetic particle collisions at accelerators, and their decay can be observed in experiment setups such as the WASA detector and the FRS in order to study their properties in detail. They are particularly interesting because current theories expect them to determine important properties of neutron stars. In a similar way, an exotic atom can be formed if electrons in the surrounding atomic shells of nuclei are replaced by other charged particles, like for instance a meson. A meson is an unstable pair of a quark and an antiquark. Studying these exotic atoms could provide a hint to understanding the origin of the mass of matter in the universe. WASA@FRS allows to produce and study such exotic, very rare systems with very high experimental sensitivity and purity.

While the FRS is largely used for the separation and identification of exotic nuclei, the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration takes advantage of its high momentum-resolution capabilities, which are unique in the world in the domain of relativistic proton and heavy-ion beams, thus allowing for unrivalled particle physics studies. The combination of a high-resolution momentum spectrometer with the “Wide Angle Shower Apparatus” WASA, which is designed to trace the tracks of large numbers of particles emitted in energetic nuclear collisions, opens a door to unprecedented experimental opportunities at the border line of atomic, nuclear and hadron physics.

The present experiments serve as pilot study for even further advanced science goals at the Super-FRS of FAIR, which is presently under construction. “The WASA research activities are largely driven by Japanese scientists. The cooperation with Japanese research institutions has been extremely valuable for GSI and we hope for an intensified continuation of this fruitful collaboration in the future”, says Paolo Giubellino. (CP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5355 Wed, 11 May 2022 08:15:00 +0200 Major honor: Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize awarded to Professor Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5355&cHash=eb1a4de54ac35e06ab796b939416e246 GSI/FAIR scientist Professor Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo received the 2022 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation). This is the most important and highest endowed German research prize. The award ceremony was held in Bonn on May 12, 2022. The decision was announced in December 2021. The award ceremony could be followed via livestream. Martínez-Pinedo was awarded for his outstanding work at the ... GSI/FAIR scientist Professor Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo received the 2022 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation). This is the most important and highest endowed German research prize. The award ceremony was held in Bonn on May 12, 2022. The decision was announced in December 2021. The award ceremony can be followed once again via stream. Martínez-Pinedo was awarded for his outstanding work at the interface between astrophysics, nuclear physics and neutrino physics. He works at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt and the Institute for Nuclear Physics at the TU Darmstadt.

Physicist Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo's work has helped to solve one of the biggest unsolved problems in physics in the 21st century: Where does the Cosmos produce heavy elements, such as precious metals gold and platinum? Together with other scientists, including Professor Almudena Arcones from Darmstadt, Martínez-Pinedo showed that these elements are created during the merger of neutron stars and that this process produces a distinct electromagnetic signal, a light curve, for which Martínez-Pinedo and colleagues created the term "kilonova." In 2017, such a kilonova was observed for the first time, following the detection of a neutron star merger in gravitational waves.

This scientific breakthrough is considered the birth of multi-messenger astronomy and opens up new scientific possibilities to understand the dynamics and nucleosynthesis of neutron star mergers. In the future, for example, the nuclear physics processes involved in the merger of neutron stars will be studied with unprecedented quality in the laboratory after completion of the international accelerator center FAIR currently being built at GSI in Darmstadt.

The Joint Committee of the DFG awarded the 2022 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize to ten researchers – five women and five men. They had previously been selected from 134 nominees. Of the ten prizewinners, four are from the humanities and social sciences, four from the natural sciences and the engineering sciences, and two from the life sciences. The prizewinners each receive prize money of €2.5 million. They are entitled to use these funds for their research work in any way they wish, without bureaucratic obstacles, for up to seven years. (TUD/DFG/BP)

Awarding of the Leibniz Prizes 2022

On 12 May 2022, the Leibniz Prizes was awarded in Bonn in front of an audience of invited guests. The event was also live streamed on the DFG’s digital channels and can be viewed again at: https://www.youtube.com/user/DFGScienceTV

Portrait film about Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo

On the occasion of the awarding of the Leibniz Prizes, portrait films of all prize winners were made.

Statements on the award for Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo

Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR: „I am extremely delighted about the great appreciation of the excellent scientific work of Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo. At the same time, the award is a proof of the outstanding opportunities in the research area of Darmstadt, at GSI and FAIR as well as at TU Darmstadt. With FAIR, we will be able to further extend the perspectives of such groundbreaking research as conducted by Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo and enable further important pioneering achievements.“

Professorin Tanja Brühl, President of TU Darmstadt: “Research personalities like Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo strengthen the role of the Technische Universität Darmstadt and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, which together have become an internationally outstanding center of nuclear astrophysics. We are proud that with Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo another Leibniz prizewinner is helping to shape the research field of Matter and Materials at TU Darmstadt.“

About Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo

Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo studied at the Autonomous University of Madrid, where he received his PhD in Theoretical Physics. His further career took him to the California Institute of Technology, the universities of Aarhus, Basel and Barcelona, among others. Since 2005, he has worked at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, where he heads now the Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure Theory Department and in 2020 became one of the directors of the Helmholtz Research Academy of Hesse for FAIR. Since 2011, Martínez-Pinedo has held the professorship of Theoretical Nuclear Astrophysics in the Department of Physics at TU Darmstadt. Martínez-Pinedo has received many awards; among others, he received an ERC Advanced Grant last year for the project "Probing r-process nucleosynthesis through electromagnetic signatures (KILONOVA)". He is a much sought-after speaker at international conferences, represents his field in important international committees, and publishes in prestigious scientific journals.

About the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize

The Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize is the most important research award in Germany. The Leibniz Programme, established in 1985, aims to improve the working conditions of outstanding researchers, expand their research opportunities, relieve them of administrative tasks, and help them employ particularly qualified early career researchers. A maximum of €2.5 million is provided per award. Prizewinners are first chosen from a slate of nominations put forward by third parties; the Joint Committee selects the actual prizewinners based on a recommendation from the Selection Committee for the Leibniz Program.

Awards are made to individuals who, with regards to the stage of their careers, have demonstrated superior achievements in their research areas both in a national and an international context and who show exceptional promise for future top-level accomplishments that will have a sustainable impact on the German research landscape. The prizes are not limited to certain research areas; the scientific quality of the previous work is the sole criterion for nomination. The prize may be awarded to individuals or research teams working at a research institution in Germany or at a German research institution abroad

More information

Photo gallery of the award ceremony

News release of the DFG

News release of the TU Darmstadt

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5351 Mon, 09 May 2022 14:44:58 +0200 Best results for two trainees of GSI/FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5351&cHash=cc60d87e3226b002b1c256a0e5e6b0b6 In the summer exams 2021 of the IHK two apprentices of GSI/FAIR were the best within the chamber district Darmstadt. Paul Döbel from the department "Mechanics & Metalworking" passed the exam as construction mechanic and Merlin Weiland from the department "Control Systems" passed the exam as electronic technician for devices and systems. The training was supervised by the instructors Thomas Schiemann and Holger Becht respectively. In the summer exams 2021 of the IHK two apprentices of GSI/FAIR were the best within the chamber district Darmstadt. Paul Döbel from the department "Mechanics & Metalworking" passed the exam as construction mechanic and Merlin Weiland from the department "Control Systems" passed the exam as electronic technician for devices and systems. The training was supervised by the instructors Thomas Schiemann and Holger Becht respectively.

Both graduates would like to expand their professional qualifications even further. “For the time being, I was taken on at GSI/FAIR in the metalworking shop, but for the future I am interested in a master craftsman training or an academic course of studies”, Paul Döbel reports. Merlin Weiland has similar plans: “I would like to complete further training as a technician.”

“Our two apprentices can be very proud of this great success. The result of Mr. Döbel and Mr. Weiland is, besides their high personal qualification, of course also a result of the work of our very competent and dedicated instructors,” explained Jasmin List from the Human Resources Development department of GSI/FAIR Human Resources. “The training of the next generation in the specialized professions employed on our campus is of great concern to us. We would like to invite all interested young people to apply for an apprenticeship with us.”

At GSI/FAIR currently 22 apprentices are trained as systems mechanics, electronic technicians, industrial mechanics, office managers or construction mechanics. Furthermore, two dual courses of studies belong to the training portfolio. Already in 2019, a GSI/FAIR apprentice was among the best of the year. (CP)

Further information:
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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5349 Thu, 05 May 2022 08:34:00 +0200 Highest degree of purity achieved for polarized X-rays https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5349&cHash=56ecc88bad27d364ae42b538c920e2f1 A research team was able to generate polarized X-rays with unprecedented purity at the European XFEL in Hamburg. The experiments involved scientists from the Helmholtz Institute Jena, a branch of GSI, Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf. The method is supposed to be used in the coming years to show that even vacuum behaves like a material under certain circumstances — a prediction from quantum electrodynamics. A research team was able to generate polarized X-rays with unprecedented purity at the European XFEL in Hamburg. The experiments involved scientists from the Helmholtz Institute Jena, a branch of GSI, Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf. The method is supposed to be used in the coming years to show that even vacuum behaves like a material under certain circumstances — a prediction from quantum electrodynamics.

The polarization of electromagnetic radiation describes in which plane in space a wave oscillates. While everyday electromagnetic radiation, such as sunlight, is unpolarized, lasers produce polarized radiation. This is an important requirement for a wide range of experiments from solid-state physics to quantum optics. 

Additional polarizers, such as those being developed at the Helmholtz Institute in Jena, have the purpose of further improving polarization purity, but for a long time the limit of a few 10-10, i.e., out of ten billion photons, only a handful have the unwanted polarization, could not be pushed any further. In 2018, Kai Schulze, first author of the paper now published in Physical Review Research, found that the divergence of synchrotron radiation is the reason for this limit. "So to get a further improvement in purity, we needed a source with better divergence," says the physicist, who leads work on vacuum birefringence at HI Jena and is jointly responsible for related DFG research projects at the University of Jena. "The commissioning of the European X-ray laser, European XFEL, in Schenefeld near Hamburg set the course for this."

Together with scientists from the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena and the Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf, Schulze and his team developed an experiment setup at the European XFEL that set a new purity record of 8×10-11 thanks to special polarizer crystals, a very precise alignment and a stable setup. This new purity record has already enabled a number of experiments on quantum optics in the X-ray range and on charge distribution in solids. However, special interest is devoted to the detection of the so-called vacuum birefringence.

The interaction of light with light was described as early as 1936 by Werner Heisenberg and Hans Euler, but has not yet been directly observed on Earth. "Vacuum birefringence is currently the most promising effect to directly detect light-light interaction," Schulze explains. "In this process, the polarization of a sample beam changes when it collides in vacuum with a very intense second light beam. The vacuum thus acts like a birefringent crystal, which also affects the polarization; hence the name. The effect is extremely small, but grows with decreasing wavelength of the sample beam. Precise polarizers in the X-ray range therefore provide a good tool to detect the effect."

The High Energy Density instrument at the European XFEL will provide the ideal conditions for such an experiment in the future, Schulze further explains. And the research team now has a setup with which the smallest polarization changes can be measured. The detection of vacuum birefringence would not only further underpin the foundations of quantum electrodynamics, but, if deviations from theoretical expectations emerge, also provide clues to previously unknown elementary particles (such as axions, or millicharged particles). "We hope to be able to launch the first experiments in the next few years."

Detection of the phenomenon would also be interesting for future experiments at the FAIR particle accelerator center. "If we succeed in measuring vacuum birefringence, this will help interpret the measurement data from FAIR. Among other things, vacuum polarization will play a role there, which is closely linked to vacuum birefringence," Schulze said. (LW)

More information

Original publication: Towards perfectly linearly polarized x-rays, Physical Review Research

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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5347 Mon, 02 May 2022 08:04:00 +0200 Hessian State Secretary Oliver Conz und District President Brigitte Lindscheid visit GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5347&cHash=2201d6ab7b48847e89486cdb2dcae140 The Secretary of State in the Hessian Ministry of the Environment, Climate Protection, Agriculture and Consumer Protection, Oliver Conz, and the District President of the Regional Council Darmstadt, Brigitte Lindscheid, recently visited GSI and FAIR to learn about the progress of the FAIR project and the current scientific activities. The guests were welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR ... The Secretary of State in the Hessian Ministry of the Environment, Climate Protection, Agriculture and Consumer Protection, Oliver Conz, and the District President of the Regional Council Darmstadt, Brigitte Lindscheid, recently visited GSI and FAIR to learn about the progress of the FAIR project and the current scientific activities. The guests were welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR as well as Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Public Relations Department of GSI and FAIR. The guests were accompanied by Vice District President Dr. Stefan Fuhrmann, and Dr. Sebastian Huber Unit II 8 in the Hessian Ministry for the Environment (Radiation Protection, Large Accelerators and Emergency Prevention).

After an introductory presentation on the status of the FAIR project, campus development, previous research successes and current experiments, the guests were invited to take a tour to the FAIR construction site and the research facilities at GSI/FAIR. One highlight was the walk-through of the underground ring tunnel for the future ring accelerator SIS100 which will be the heart of the FAIR facility. Furthermore the guests could visit the central transfer building, the crucial hub for the facility’s beamline, which is currently being built over several floors.

Another important focus was on the high-tech components developed specifically for FAIR. The guests were shown the testing hall, where new FAIR components are assembled and tested. The energy-efficient high-performance data center Green IT Cube was also visited. It is one of the leading scientific computing centers in the world, setting new benchmarks in IT technology and energy saving. (BP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5345 Fri, 29 Apr 2022 08:10:00 +0200 Girls’Day 2022 at GSI and FAIR again on site https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5345&cHash=96dac5cc2681e06a92f072d9b60cb5c1 The nationwide day of action Girls'Day could take place on site on the campus of GSI and FAIR again this year. Due to the Corona situation, the capacity available was still slightly reduced compared to previous years, but nevertheless a total of 35 girls between the ages of eleven and fifteen took part in the event and informed themselves about the accelerator facilities and experiments, about research and infrastructure, and especially about the career opportunities at GSI and FAIR. The nationwide day of action Girls'Day could take place on site on the campus of GSI and FAIR again this year. Due to the Corona situation, the capacity available was still slightly reduced compared to previous years, but nevertheless a total of 35 girls between the ages of eleven and fifteen took part in the event and informed themselves about the accelerator facilities and experiments, about research and infrastructure, and especially about the career opportunities at GSI and FAIR.

Following a welcome by the organizing Public Relations department and the deputy head of the Human Resources department, Mathias Mauer, the girls first went on an accompanied discovery tour to some stations on campus. They took a look at the experimental storage ring ESR, visited the treatment site for tumor therapy with carbon ions and marveled at the large detector setup HADES. The program also included a walk to the viewing platform of the large construction site for the future FAIR accelerator.

Afterwards, the girls learned more about individual work areas on campus in small groups. These included science activities in materials research, atomic physics and at the ALICE experiment, as well as numerous infrastructure facilities such as the target laboratory, cryogenics, the mechanical workshop and IT. In a special FAIR construction offer, some of the girls were also able to get a glimpse of construction activity on the large-scale site, getting up close and personal with excavators, cranes and lots and lots of concrete.

“We were very glad that the pandemic situation allowed us to conduct the event on site again this year,” explains organizer Carola Pomplun, who is a physicist herself and works in the Public Relations department at GSI and FAIR. “Last year we had a very successful online event on the occasion of Girls'Day, but it is still different for both the supervisors and the participants when you can get into personal contact, see the work ‘live’ and ask and answer questions directly. Many groups built or made something small on campus that could be taken home. The girls took up the offer enthusiastically and our spots were fully booked within a short time.”

“In addition to the possibility of working at GSI/FAIR as part of scientific study, for example for bachelor's, master's or doctoral theses, we also offer apprenticeships in seven professions as well as dual study programs,” says Mathias Mauer. “If the girls liked it here, I’d like to very much encouraged them to apply for those or for an internship as well.”

Girls’Day is a day of action all over Germany. On this day, businesses, universities, and other institutions all over Germany open their doors to schoolgirls from grade 5 and above. The participants learn about courses of study and training in professions in the areas of IT, natural sciences, and technology — areas in which women have rarely been employed in the past. GSI and — since its foundation — also FAIR have been participating in the annual event since the early days of Girls'Day. (CP)

Further information

Website of the nation-wide day of action "Girls'Day" (German)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5343 Mon, 25 Apr 2022 13:50:09 +0200 Green IT Cube becomes research and transfer center — 5.5 million euros EU funding for the supercomputing center of GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5343&cHash=2b65707d6cffc3d40119b25ea374574e The joint supercomputing center Green IT Cube of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt will be expanded into a research and transfer center focusing on "Water Cooling of Mainframe Computer Systems". For this purpose, GSI receives project funding of 5.5 million Euros from the REACT-EU program. The joint supercomputing center Green IT Cube of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt will be expanded into a research and transfer center focusing on "Water Cooling of Mainframe Computer Systems". For this purpose, GSI receives project funding of 5.5 million Euros from the REACT-EU program.

With the Green IT Cube, GSI and FAIR have a very energy-efficient and sustainable data center, whose technology is based on the cold water cooling of the computer racks and the reuse of the dissipated heat. As a result, the energy used for cooling is equivalent to less than seven percent of the electrical power used for computing, instead of 30 to 100 percent as is the case in traditional data centers with air cooling. Originally envisioned as an environmentally friendly solution to house the computing capacity for the FAIR accelerator which is currently under construction, the facility has since attracted significant interest from a wide range of research and industrial sectors.

“The funding will enable research and development projects on a more sustainable operation of data centers, also together with industrial partners, and to exploit synergies. The partners will contribute their know-how and innovation potential,” says Professor Paolo Giubellino, the Scientific Managing Director of FAIR and GSI. “The expansion also allows partners from the scientific environment to use our data center space for their own research work. Just a few days ago, the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Development announced that the Hessian Center for Artificial Intelligence hessian.AI will use the space in our data center to establish an AI innovation lab.

The project funds are part of the REACT-EU (Recovery Assistance for Cohesion and the Territories of Europe) program, which the European Commission distributes through the German federal states. Funding is provided for projects on direct Covid 19 pandemic response and for furthering sustainability. The state of Hesse is using the funds, among other things, to expand research and infrastructure facilities at universities and non-university research institutions. “This is a grant with an extremely small own contribution, but the funds must be spent in a relatively short period of time,” explains Dr. Arjan Vink, head of the GSI/FAIR Grant Office.

By the end of the year, two available floors of the Green IT Cube will be equipped with the necessary power and water cooling supplies, and one of these floors will be equipped with a total of 128 racks. Interested partners, such as hessian.AI (via the Technical University of Darmstadt), can then install their computer systems in the racks and operate them on the GSI/FAIR campus. A similar agreement already exists with Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences, which uses several of the existing racks. Negotiations have already begun with other interested parties.

In order to begin communication with interested partners, the Digital Open Lab has been established by the Technology Transfer staff unit of GSI and FAIR as an environment for developping, testing and upscaling of energy-efficient high-performance computing to the scale of industrial demonstrators. It offers partners the infrastructure and in-house IT expertise for joint development projects, access to GSI/FAIR high-performance computing systems and rack space for their own systems, and it provides a living lab dedicated to future research and development projects and to the provision for third-party funded projects.

Funding for the Green IT Cube in particular can help strengthen future technologies and provide the infrastructure to increase innovation potential. Funding will also enable the procurement and testing of novel, as yet little-established systems that could enable particularly sustainable data center operations with low energy consumption. Research and development on such systems aims at contributing to efficient and energy-saving computing clusters in the future.

Originally, scientists use the Green IT Cube to perform simulations and develop detectors for FAIR. They also analyze measurement data from experiments at GSI's accelerator facilities and, in the future, at FAIR, which are used to gain fundamental insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe. The efficient cooling process makes allows the placement of the computers in the Green IT Cube in a space-saving manner. At present, two of the six floors are equipped with a maximum cooling capacity of four megawatts. When completed, the Green IT Cube will be able to achieve a cooling capacity of twelve megawatts. Due to saving energy and space, it is very cost-efficient. In addition, the waste heat of the Green IT Cube’s servers is already being used to heat a modern office and canteen building on the GSI/FAIR campus. The high-performance concept has already won several awards for innovation and environmental friendliness, including the Blue Angel eco-label of the German government. (CP)

Further information:

This project is funded by the European Regional Development Fund as part of the Union's response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5341 Mon, 25 Apr 2022 10:18:35 +0200 GSI/FAIR receives high-ranking Georgian visitors https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5341&cHash=7f558a74c826f77247add28c759b46ad The future cooperation between Georgia and GSI/FAIR was the focus of the visit of a high-ranking delegation with the Georgian Minister of Education and Science, Professor Mikheil Chkhenkeli, to GSI and FAIR. The visitors were received by the management of GSI and FAIR and various leading scientists. The future cooperation between Georgia and GSI/FAIR was the focus of the visit of a high-ranking delegation with the Georgian Minister of Education and Science, Professor Mikheil Chkhenkeli, to GSI and FAIR. The visitors were received by the management of GSI and FAIR and various leading scientists.

The delegation included, in addition to the minister Professor Mikheil Chkhenkeli, also Levan Diasamidze, Georgian consul general in Frankfurt, Nikoloz Chkhetiani, Chairman of the board of the international charity foundation Cartu, Vakhtang Tsagareli, Director of Project Management and Operations at the international charity foundation Cartu and Professor Alexander Tevzadze, Rector of Kutaisi International University (KIU). Participants from GSI and FAIR were Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director, Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Public Relations Department, Professor Marco Durante, Head of Biophysics Department, Professor Christian Graeff, Deputy Head of Biophysics Department, Dr. Christian-Joachim Schmidt, Head of Detector Lab and Dr. Irakli Keshelashvili, Staff Scientist at Detector Lab.

An important subject of the visit was the strengthening of scientific relations. This included the intensification and expansion of collaboration in the field of particle therapy using ions and protons as well as in detector and IT technologies. Possibilities for Georgian participation in the FAIR project were also discussed during the high-ranking visit. The promotion of young international scientists, for example via specific exchange and student programs such as the GET_INvolved program running very successfully at GSI/FAIR, was another important topic. The guests were impressed by GSI/FAIR's world-class research and its great potential for the future. They expressed their great wish for future cooperation.

The extensive two-day program for the Georgian visitors included an introductory presentation about the FAIR project, campus development, research successes and current experiments of the FAIR Phase 0 program. From the viewing platform, the guests were able to get an overview of the current FAIR construction activities on the 20-hectare construction field in the east of the existing GSI and FAIR campus.

The test facility where high-tech superconducting accelerator magnets (Series Test Facility, STF) for FAIR are tested, was also among the tour stops. The program also included the treatment unit for tumor therapy, the detector lab and the energy-efficient supercomputing center Green IT Cube. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5339 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 09:32:12 +0200 High-school students analyze measurement data — ALICE Masterclass in virtual format https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5339&cHash=63e9b028428d920c455c77590d22ca39 In March, interested students had again the opportunity to analyze data from the ALICE experiment at the CERN research center in a virtual masterclass. The event was jointly organized by scientists of the ALICE experiment from the Universities of Frankfurt and Münster as well as from GSI. In March, interested students had again the opportunity to analyze data from the ALICE experiment at the CERN research center in a virtual masterclass. The event was jointly organized by scientists of the ALICE experiment from the Universities of Frankfurt and Münster as well as from GSI.

In the framework of the ALICE Masterclass, 13 students were able to gain an insight into the scientific work and data analysis . Under the expert guidance of the scientists, they analyzed the ALICE experiment data themselves and discussed their results with other participants in a joint video link. A virtual visit to the ALICE measurement setup at CERN was also part of the day's program.

ALICE is one of the four large-scale experiments at the LHC collider at the CERN research center in Geneva and deals in particular with heavy ion collisions of lead atomic nuclei. When lead atomic nuclei collide with unimaginable impact in the LHC, conditions are created similar to the first moments of the universe. During the collisions, a so-called quark-gluon plasma is created for a very short time - a state of matter that existed in the universe shortly after the Big Bang. This plasma transforms back into normal matter within fractions of a second. The particles produced in the process provide information about the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. Thus, the measurements can peer into the birth of the cosmos and reveal information about the basic building blocks of matter and their interactions.

The relationship between GSI and ALICE is traditionally very close: The two large ALICE detector systems Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) were designed and built with significant contributions of GSI’s ALICE department and Detector Laboratory. Today scientists from both departments focus on the TPC, which is the centerpiece for track reconstruction in the central ALICE barrel setup and is also indispensable for particle identification. Scientist from GSI's IT department contribute strongly to the new data acquisition and analysis software O2, and the GSI computer center is an integral part of the computer network for data analysis of the ALICE experiment.

The Masterclasses are organized by the IPPOG (International Particle Physics Outreach Group), of which GSI is an associate member. Each year, more than 13,000 students from 60 countries take part in the events of about 225 universities or research centers for a day to unlock the mysteries of particle physics. All events in Germany are held in collaboration with the Netzwerk Teilchenwelt, of which GSI/FAIR is a member. The goal of the nationwide network for communicating particle physics to young people and teachers is to make particle physics accessible to a broader public. (CP)

Further information:
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Aktuelles
news-5337 Fri, 08 Apr 2022 09:20:32 +0200 Funding for strong research network in North Rhine-Westphalia for FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5337&cHash=52a568871ddb61a067319ff82bc01aa5 The state of North Rhine-Westphalia is supporting five outstanding research networks in pioneering research fields with a total of around 81.2 million euros. The particle accelerator centre FAIR also benefits from this, as one of the funded networks is the NRW-FAIR network, which is actively involved in FAIR's research projects and experiments. The state of North Rhine-Westphalia is supporting five outstanding research networks in pioneering research fields with a total of around 81.2 million euros. The particle accelerator centre FAIR also benefits from this, as one of the funded networks is the NRW-FAIR network, which is actively involved in FAIR's research projects and experiments.

Under the leadership of the University of Bochum, the researchers of the NRW-FAIR network want to play a major role in shaping the scientific work at FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Darmstadt. From August 2022, the network will be funded by the state government of North Rhine-Westphalia with around 16,5 million euros over a period of four years. 

In addition to the University of Bochum, the University of Bonn, the Research Centre Jülich and the University of Münster and the University of Wuppertal as well as the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research are involved in the NRW-FAIR network. In addition, an extension of the network to the universities of Bielefeld and Cologne is being considered.

The funding of the NRW-FAIR network underlines the relevance of the FAIR Scientific program. A major focus of the participating universities are the research pillars PANDA and CBM. “We are delighted that these major universities team up to strengthen their participation in FAIR,” says Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI/FAIR. “The NRW-FAIR network will significantly intensify our cooperation and will help us to fulfill the fundamental mission of our laboratory which is to provide scientists in research institutions all over the world with opportunities to conduct outstanding research.”

The long-standing cooperation between GSI/FAIR and the universities of North Rhine-Westphalia is reflected in the close collaborations already in place. The universities are involved both in working on scientific questions for FAIR and in developing experimental technology for FAIR.

The aim of the entire funding program of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia is to sustainably strengthen existing topic-related and cross-location research networks of universities, universities of applied sciences and non-university research institutions, to expand them and to increase their visibility and international competitiveness. (LW)

More Information

Press release of the state government of north rhine-westphalia (German only)

Press release of Ruhr-Universität Bochum
 

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5333 Tue, 05 Apr 2022 09:51:50 +0200 Closer cooperation between Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences, EUt+ and GSI/FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5333&cHash=e34e9ab8ea737e56ddb39a5ff18cdf09 Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences (h_da), as representative of the “European University of Technology” (EUt+), GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research) and the FAIR accelerator centre have signed a contract aimed at deepening their cooperation yesterday. Over the longer term, the “GET_INvolved” Programme will offer students and researchers the possibility to complete internships and research visits at GSI/FAIR. It is open to all students and resea Joint press release of Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences and GSI and FAIR

Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences (h_da), as representative of the “European University of Technology” (EUt+), GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research) and the FAIR accelerator centre have signed a contract aimed at deepening their cooperation yesterday. Over the longer term, the “GET_INvolved” Programme will offer students and researchers the possibility to complete internships and research visits at GSI/FAIR. It is open to all students and researchers – above all doctoral candidates – from EUt+ universities. The contract was signed yesterday at h_da by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, and Professor Arnd Steinmetz, President of Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences.

In future, up to ten students and doctoral candidates per year will profit from this new partnership: in the framework of short-term internships or research visits lasting several years, they will be able to learn and work in the pioneering research environment at GSI/FAIR, which will, among others, nominate mentors for them and help them, if required, to find accommodation for the duration of their stay. The participants of the programme can also take part in GSI/FAIR events. These include symposia and lectures as well as the GSI’s summer programme for students.

The partners will form a joint jury for the selection procedure. Internships can last between three and six months and require at least a bachelor’s degree. Applicants for research visits must hold a master’s degree, be a doctoral candidate or produce evidence of at least two years’ research experience. Such visits can last up to two years.

“The coming years are critical to significantly sharpen the science at FAIR as one of the best scientific laboratories in the world, along with the broad FAIR international scientific community,” says Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR. “FAIR/GSI has been a talent factory, and through the framework of the GET_INvolved Programme, young students and researchers at Hochschule Darmstadt and EUt+ alliance partners in 7 European countries would considerably profit from the FAIR scientific community’s technical knowledge and expertise while performing their training.”

Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR: “Hochschule Darmstadt and the European University of Technology alliance (EUt+) are natural partners for FAIR/GSI. Through their ingenuity, FAIR/GSI scientists and engineers are constantly pushing the frontiers of technology. I am delighted to see that the GET_INvolved Programme partnership is established, as it will provide young brilliant engineers from alliance partners with first-hand exposure in a mega-science facility.”

“The new partnership with GSI/FAIR opens up completely new opportunities for students and young researchers from the whole EUt+. It is a further important step for h_da and shows our significance as a partner in the science and research landscape,” says Professor Arnd Steinmetz, President of Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences. (HDA/LW)

Further information

Details of the application procedure for students and researchers interested in the h_da/EUt+ and GSI/FAIR GET_INvolved Programme will be published shortly. Further information on the GET_INvolved Programme can be found on the programme pages of the h_da/EUt+ and GSI/FAIR websites. For immediate queries, please contact Dr Jorge Medina, EUt+ Coordinator, at coordinator-eutplus(at)h-da.de or Dr Pradeep Ghosh, Programme Coordinator on behalf of GSI/FAIR, at Pr.Ghosh(at)gsi.de.

Background

Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences (h_da) and GSI/FAIR have already been working together on different levels for quite some time. A similar contract in the area of internships and research visits has existed since 2014. With “GET_INvolved”, this is now being substantially expanded – among others to all students and researchers in the EUt+ alliance.

About the “European University of Technology” (EUt+)

EUt+ stands for “European University of Technology”, a joint project between h_da and seven partner universities throughout the whole of Europe. The European Commission is supporting the alliance in the framework of the European Universities Initiative, which aims to strengthen the European Education Area (EEA). Step by step, the universities want to grow closer together. EUt+ helps students to spend part of their studies at one of the partner universities. It is also increasing staff mobility as well as the number and volume of joint research projects. The European University of Technology unites 100,000 students and 12,000 staff. The participating institutions are connected by their shared focus on technologies that centre on human and environmental needs.

About GSI/FAIR

The GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research) in Darmstadt operates a globally leading accelerator facility for research purposes. Around 1,600 staff work at GSI, who are joined each year by some 1,000 researchers from universities and other research institutes around the world. Their experiments at the facility enable them to gain new insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the Universe. They also develop innovative medical and technical applications. GSI is a limited liability company (GmbH). Shareholders are Germany’s Federal Government with 90%, the State of Hesse with 8%, as well as the State of Rhineland-Palatinate and the Free State of Thuringia with 1% each. GSI is a member of the Helmholtz Association, Germany’s largest research organisation. FAIR, an international accelerator facility for research with antiprotons and ions, which is being developed and built in cooperation with international partners, is currently under construction at GSI. It is one of the largest construction projects worldwide for international cutting-edge research. The FAIR project was initiated by the scientific community and researchers at GSI. The GSI accelerators will become part of the future FAIR facility and perform the first acceleration stage.

Links

GET_INvolved Programme
GSI and FAIR
European University of Technology
Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences

 

 

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Presse Aktuelles
news-5331 Tue, 29 Mar 2022 11:00:00 +0200 Cutting-edge control center: Foundation stone laid for high-performance FAIR control center https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5331&cHash=7457ee9b5d8036d0d15dc659adf0b9d9 The construction for the FAIR Control Center (FCC) has begun. The start of work is an important step in the construction of the international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) and marks a decisive moment for one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide. On March 29, 2022, the symbolic laying of the foundation stone for the new building took place on the construction site directly at the western entrance to the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung The construction for the FAIR Control Center (FCC) has begun. The start of work is an important step in the construction of the international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) and marks a decisive moment for one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide. On March 29, 2022, the symbolic laying of the foundation stone for the new building took place on the construction site directly at the western entrance to the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. It was an honour for GSI/FAIR to receive the Federal Minister of Education and Research, Bettina Stark-Watzinger, the Hessian Minister of Higher Education, Research, Science and the Arts, Angela Dorn, the Hessian Minister of Finance, Michael Boddenberg, and Jochen Partsch, Lord Mayor of the Science City of Darmstadt, on this occasion. When completed, the FAIR Control Center will be a crucial hub of the entire infrastructure on the GSI/FAIR campus.

The FAIR accelerator facilities will provide particle beams of unprecedented intensity and precision, enabling scientist to perform unique experiments to gain new insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present. Therefore, an integrated state-of-the art control center is needed to control and monitor the extremely complex accelerator facility. The control tasks will be performed by a specialized accelerator operation team exploiting sophisticated software tools including AI based processes. The future Main Control Room (MCR) is significantly larger than the existing main control room at the GSI facility, which is suitable to serve the GSI facilities but could no longer meet additional space and technical requirements for FAIR. The FAIR facility is about four times as large as the existing GSI facility and will enable the realization of a significantly higher number of experiments. In addition, with FAIR the parallel operation of experiments increases.

In addition to the main control room, more than 200 new scientific office workplaces will be established in the building, as well as meeting rooms for experiment collaborations and a visitors' gallery. The five-story FAIR Control Center, partial with basement, has a total gross floor area of approximately 6000 square feet.

At the same time as the foundation stone is being laid, FAIR's scientific program is already in its first stage of implementation, the so-called "FAIR Phase 0". Here, the researchers are using the GSI accelerator facilities, which have been significantly improved for their later use as pre-accelerators for FAIR and will be further technically upgraded. Thanks to the detectors and instrumentation already developed by the large international FAIR collaborations and the improved particle accelerators, it is already possible to enter new physics territory.

During the foundation stone ceremony, high representatives from politics, both the federal government and the state, as well as from science and the building industry gave greetings and symbolically laid the foundation stone for the FCC. The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, emphasized the great potential FAIR offers for research worldwide: “FAIR will open up outstanding research for decades involving a world-wide scientific community. With the FAIR facility, researchers from all over the world will be able to investigate key questions about the structure of the universe by producing the fundamental processes in the laboratory, but also to advance applications in medicine, materials research, and IT, for example. FAIR is also an ideal education site for the next generations of scientists and engineers. The current research program FAIR-Phase-0 already offers excellent research programs; in the coming years, FAIR will progressively enter into operation opening unique opportunities for science and technology.” (BP)

Statements on the foundation stone ceremony

Bettina Stark-Watzinger, Federal Minister of Education and Research, says: “The establishment of FAIR emphasizes Germany’s outstanding position in basic physical research. The construction of facilities like FAIR is an investment in the future of our country. The Federal Ministry of Education and Research supports FAIR in becoming a magnet for the world’s best scientists. Today’s laying of the foundation stone together with the federal state of Hesse is another important step in this direction.”

Angela Dorn, Hessian Minister of Higher Education, Research, Science and the Arts, says: “FAIR is a worldwide unique facility, which is also of outstanding importance for the Hessian research landscape. The particle accelerator will allow to study the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present. It is about fundamental knowledge, about whatever holds the world together in its inmost folds, as well as about developing new applications for technology and medicine. The international collaboration of the global research community on this project is an important foundation for its success, but it also holds challenges in light of the current world situation. We welcome the FAIR Council's constructive engagement with them to realize this outstanding scientific facility."

Michael Boddenberg, Hessian Minister of Finance, says: “The laying of the foundation stone for the FAIR Control Center creates the basis for groundbreaking scientific findings. It forms the interface to the international FAIR project and will sustainably strengthen our science and business hub through cutting-edge research. Together with the Federal Government and in cooperation with its international partners, the Hessian State Government has always supported GSI's research operations and the construction of FAIR. I would like to thank all those involved in the project who have contributed to the fact that we can celebrate this important construction progress together today.

Jochen Partsch, Lord Mayor of the Science City of Darmstadt, says: “The pioneering FAIR Control Centre project confirms our location's qualities as an important reference point for top international research and will boost research and science to a new dimension. I am proud to witness that the City of Science Darmstadt is further opening the door to the universe and offering the unique opportunity to conduct cutting-edge research.”

Volker Pohlschmidt, Managing Director of Bauunternehmung Karl Gemünden GmbH & Co. KG, says: “As the executing shell construction company for the construction of the FAIR Control Center FCC, we would like to thank you for the opportunity to participate in this seminal building. We consider ourselves very fortunate that the public sector trusts in our range of services. It represents an important contractor for us, especially in times of crisis."

About FAIR

The international accelerator center FAIR, which is currently being built at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, will be one of the largest and most complex accelerator facilities in the world. The centerpiece is the ring accelerator SIS100 with a circumference of 1100 meters, which has already been completed in its structural shell. Connected to this is a complex system of storage rings and experimental stations. The existing GSI accelerators serve as pre-accelerators. Engineers and scientists work together in international collaborations to drive forward new technological developments in many areas, for example in information technology or superconductivity technology. In the future, about 3000 researchers from all over the world will be able to conduct cutting-edge research at FAIR. In outstanding experiments, they will gain fundamental new insights into the structure of matter and the development of the universe.

Further information

Additional images can be found at www.gsi.de/fcc-footage

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5325 Tue, 22 Mar 2022 08:31:00 +0100 EU funding to investigate the socio-economic impact of FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5325&cHash=8def38c078b226b7ea9c85fb160d4f99 Large research infrastructures like FAIR are built to answer fundamental questions about the nature of physics and the formation of the universe. They often are international projects, and their job is to carry out world class, excellent science. But they don’t operate in a vacuum. Their activities have impact on their regions and countries well beyond the science they do. The new CASEIA project has now received EU funding to measure this socio-economic influence. Large research infrastructures like FAIR are built to answer fundamental questions about the nature of physics and the formation of the universe. They often are international projects, and their job is to carry out world class, excellent science. But they don’t operate in a vacuum. Their activities have impact on their regions and countries well beyond the science they do. The new CASEIA project has now received EU funding to measure this socio-economic influence.

FAIR’s socio-economic impact is the sum of the effects of the project on everyone and everything it has touched. Socio-economic impact refers to jobs for people in the Rhein-Main region, in Germany and abroad. It includes the education and training young people receive at FAIR under the mentorship of the master craftspeople in their workshops and from scientists and engineers. It means the impact of discoveries made at FAIR and GSI on innovative materials, medical treatments and energy. It includes, for example, positive effects through inventions like the energy efficient supercomputing center Green IT Cube at GSI/FAIR.

To measure and to prove these factors is a challenge. But FAIR is committed to finding ways to determine its socio-economic impact and to develop it positively. For this purpose, FAIR has received an EU grant to develop a methodology, with emphasis on the impact of innovation. The project is called CASEIA (Comparative Analysis of Socio-Economic Impact in ATTRACT), it will run until September 2024 and is funded with 120,000 €. CASEIA is part of ATTRACT that has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme. Leading the study consortium is Dr. Sonia Utermann (FAIR). The other consortium members are Steinbeis Research Center Technology Management North East (Rostock), the Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (Karlsruhe) and the Human Sciences Research Council (Stellenbosch, South Africa).

CASEIA aims for its findings to be relevant for future strategic innovation programming at FAIR and other large research infrastructures, and to establish methodologies transferrable to other fields of socio-economic impact. (CP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5327 Fri, 18 Mar 2022 10:00:00 +0100 BASE collaboration sets new standards: Matter/antimatter symmetry and antimatter gravity studied at once https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5327&cHash=46940ea76112e9b88db5ea28e64fb0af In the scientific journal Nature, the BASE collaboration at CERN reports on the world's most accurate comparison between protons and antiprotons: The charge-to-mass ratios of antiprotons and protons are identical to eleven digits. This new measurement improves the accuracy of the previous best value by more than a factor of four. The data-set, collected over a period of 1.5 years, also enables a test of the weak equivalence principle, which says that matter and antimatter behave the same under gravity. Res This news is based on press releases of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg, and the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

In the scientific journal Nature, the BASE collaboration at CERN reports on the world's most accurate comparison between protons and antiprotons: The charge-to-mass ratios of antiprotons and protons are identical to eleven digits. This new measurement improves the accuracy of the previous best value by more than a factor of four. The data-set, collected over a period of 1.5 years, also enables a test of the weak equivalence principle, which says that matter and antimatter behave the same under gravity. Researchers from GSI/FAIR are actively involved in the BASE collaboration.

Symmetry and beauty are closely related, not only in music, arts and architecture, but also in the fundamental laws of physics that describe our Universe. It is in some sense ironic that our existence seems to be a consequence of a broken symmetry in the best fundamental theory that exists, the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. One of the cornerstones of the SM is the charge, parity, time (CPT) reversal invariance. Applied to the equations of the SM, the CPT operation translates matter into antimatter. As a consequence of CPT symmetry, matter/antimatter conjugates have the same masses, charges, and magnetic moments, the latter of opposite sign. Another consequence of CPT is that once matter/antimatter conjugates collide, they annihilate to pure energy and other particle-antiparticle pairs, as observed in many laboratory experiments. In that sense, the existence of our Universe is not self-evident at all. We have reason to assume that in the Big Bang matter and antimatter were created in equal amounts. Why only matter remained, which makes up the celestial bodies in the Universe, has yet to be understood.

Another hot topic in modern physics is the question whether matter and antimatter behave the same under gravity. In their new paper, the BASE scientists compare the similarity of antiproton and proton charge-to-mass ratios as well as antimatter and matter clocks while the Earth was tracing the gravitational potential of the sun, which means, that they have simultaneously studied both questions in one measurement.

To perform their high-precision studies, the team led by Stefan Ulmer, chief-scientist at RIKEN, Japan, and spokesperson of the BASE collaboration, used a Penning trap, i.e. an electromagnetic container capable of storing and detecting a single quantum of charge. A single particle in such a trap oscillates with a characteristic frequency defined by its mass. Listening to oscillation frequencies of antiprotons and protons in the same trap allows the scientists to compare their masses. “By loading a cylindrical stack of several such Penning traps with antiprotons and negative hydrogen ions, we were able to perform a mass comparison in a measurement time of only four minutes, which means 50 times faster than previous proton/antiproton comparisons by other trap groups,” explains Stefan Ulmer. “Compared to our earlier measurements, we have substantially improved the experimental apparatus. That increases experiment stability and reduces systematic shifts in the measurements.” With this advanced instrument, the BASE team sampled a data set of about 24000 individual frequency comparisons in a time window of 1.5 years. By combining all the measured results, the researchers found that the charge-to-mass ratio of antiprotons and protons is identical, with a precision of 16 parts in a trillion, a number with 11 significant digits. This improves the precision of the best previous measurement, also from BASE, by more than a factor of 4: a significant advance in precision physics.

A particle oscillating in a Penning trap can be considered as a “clock”, an antiparticle as an “anti-clock”. Clocks at high gravitational potential go slower. During the long-term measurement of 1.5 years, the Earth, on its elliptic orbit, was exposed to different gravitational potentials of the Sun. With different gravitational behavior of antimatter and matter, the matter and antimatter clocks would experience different frequency shifts along Earth’s planetary trajectory. Analyzing their data, the BASE scientists were not able to find any frequency anomaly. This enabled them to set first direct and largely model-independent limits for anomalous behavior of antimatter in gravitational fields, or, in other words, confirmed the validity of the weak equivalence principle for clocks within the limit of measurement accuracy.

“To measure with even higher precision, we need to move the antiprotons from the accelerator environment of CERN's antimatter factory to dedicated calm laboratory space,” explains Christian Smorra, physicist at the Mainz based PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence and deputy-spokesperson of BASE, the next steps. “For this purpose, the BASE team is currently constructing the transportable antiproton trap BASE-STEP.” The current plan is to move the antiprotons to a calm laboratory at CERN. If that was successful, the antiprotons can also be distributed to other trap labs. “We will use the transport trap to make even more sensitive tests with antiprotons. In this way, we want to make sure that no new physics with antiprotons will elude us.”

The BASE collaboration consists of scientists from RIKEN Fundamental Symmetries Laboratory, the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), the University of Tokyo, the GSI Helmholtzzentrum in Darmstadt, the Leibniz University Hannover, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Braunschweig and ETH Zürich. The research presented now was performed as part of the work of the Max Planck-RIKEN-PTB Center for Time, Constants and Fundamental Symmetries. (MPIK/JGU/BP)

Further information

Scientific publication in Nature

BASE experiment at CERN

Press release of the Max Planck Institut for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg

Press release of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5323 Mon, 14 Mar 2022 13:13:27 +0100 Successful young researchers are awarded prizes by the Giersch Foundation https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5323&cHash=34a50789361617fdf9024742b992d7c5 For excellent doctoral theses and promising doctoral progress, the non-profit Giersch Foundation together with the Helmholtz Graduate School "HGS-HIRe for FAIR" awarded the Giersch Excellence Awards and Giersch Excellence Grants 2021. Since the award was established in 2015, it has honored outstanding young researchers. For excellent doctoral theses and promising doctoral progress, the non-profit Giersch Foundation together with the Helmholtz Graduate School "HGS-HIRe for FAIR" awarded the Giersch Excellence Awards and Giersch Excellence Grants 2021. Since the award was established in 2015, it has honored outstanding young researchers.

This time, the "Giersch Award for an Outstanding Doctoral Thesis", worth 6000 euros each, was presented to four young researchers for their completed dissertations who have demonstrated their exceptional scientific talent: Dr. Frédéric Julian Kornas („Global polarization of Λ hyperons as a probe for vortical effects in A+A collisions at HADES“, TU Darmstadt), Dr. Daria Kostyleva („Experimental Studies of Proton-Unbound Nuclei via In-Flight Decay Spectroscopy“, Justus Liebig University Gießen), Dr. Tabea Pfuhl („Influence of secondary electron spectra on the enhanced effectiveness of ion beams”, TU Darmstadt) und Dr. Lukas Weih („Multimessenger Approaches to Exploring Dense Matter in Neutron Stars“, Goethe University Frankfurt)

Another 24 promising young researchers, currently in the doctoral phase at universities in the region, were awarded a "Giersch Excellence Grant" of 2,500 euros each: Nora Weickgenannt, Jan Fotakis, Jan-Erik Christian, Carolin Schlosser, Marc Winstel, Tim Rogoschinski, Matthias Kleiner, Michael Jung, Patrick Müller, Thorsten Conrad, Manjunath Omana Kuttan, Simon Spies, Sabrina Huth, Jan Hoppe, Leon Kirsch, Verena Velthaus, Patrick Müller, Maximilian Wiest, Wilhelm Krüger, Simon Lauber, Julian List, Gabriella Kripko-Koncz, Esther Menz und Nico Santowsky.

The young scientists were chosen by a selection committee consisting of expert representatives of the Goethe University Frankfurt and the Technische Universität Darmstadt and chaired by Professor Henner Büsching. For pandemic reasons, the traditional award ceremony was not held in attendance form.

The Helmholtz Graduate School for Hadron and Ion Research "HGS-HIRe for FAIR" is a joint endeavor of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, the universities at Darmstadt, Frankfurt, Giessen, Heidelberg and Mainz together with FIAS to promote and support structured PhD education for research associated with GSI and FAIR. Currently, within this framework more than 300 doctoral students are working on their dissertations with a connection to GSI and FAIR.

The Giersch Foundation was established in 1994 by the founding couple Senator E.h. Professor Carlo Giersch and his wife Senator E.h. Karin Giersch and is committed to the fields of science and research, art and culture as well as the promotion of medical projects in the Rhine-Main area. (BP)

More information

Homepage of HGS-HIRe for FAIR

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5313 Thu, 10 Mar 2022 08:19:00 +0100 Mentoring Hessen meets GSI/FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5313&cHash=5163994405628df752403ea69d00ff08 On February 18th, 30 mentees and mentors from Mentoring Hessen paid a virtual visit to GSI and FAIR. GSI/FAIR employees offered a virtual tour through the facility, from the ion sources to the experiments, and gave an insight into the diverse activities at the research center: How are ions accelerated and how are the beamtimes organized? What happens when ions hit materials or human tissue? How do collisions of atoms and atomic nuclei provide insight into what happens in the interior of planets and stars? On February 18th, 30 mentees and mentors from Mentoring Hessen paid a virtual visit to GSI and FAIR. GSI/FAIR employees offered a virtual tour through the facility, from the ion sources to the experiments, and gave an insight into the diverse activities at the research center: How are ions accelerated and how are the beamtimes organized? What happens when ions hit materials or human tissue? How do collisions of atoms and atomic nuclei provide insight into what happens in the interior of planets and stars? How are targets for the accelerated ions produced? Exciting questions from the participants about the research topics led to lively discussions with the experts. The presentation of technology transfer showed how innovative ideas from research are transferred to application.

Mentoring Hessen supports women on their career paths in science and business. From the very beginning, since 1998, colleagues from GSI and FAIR have actively participated in Mentoring Hessen and its predecessor projects. GSI has also been a cooperation partner for over 20 years. Christina Trautmann, head of materials research, has been a member of the steering group for GSI since 2017.

In the past, there have always been exciting encounters between mentors and mentees. And sometimes mentees find their mentor's job so interesting that they successfully apply for a job or a doctoral position at GSI/FAIR at the end of the mentoring year. (KG/CP)

Further information:
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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5329 Fri, 04 Mar 2022 08:33:00 +0100 Statement on the war of aggression by Russia on Ukraine https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5329&cHash=408b7b5b93666f147314a6070f216b4c Researchers from all over the world have been working together for decades at the accelerators and experimental facilities at GSI and FAIR. They work to together on peaceful, non-military scientific objectives, independent of political, religious and ideological aspects. We condemn the war of aggression of Russia and the breach of international law by the Russian government. That is why we fully stand behind the sanctions imposed by the German government and its international partners. Researchers from all over the world have been working together for decades at the accelerators and experimental facilities at GSI and FAIR. They work to together on peaceful, non-military scientific objectives, independent of political, religious and ideological aspects.

We condemn the war of aggression of Russia and the breach of international law by the Russian government. That is why we fully stand behind the sanctions imposed by the German government and its international partners. We are aware that they will have a strong impact on our own activities, but we believe that these measures are necessary in the current situation.

In accordance with the Alliance of German Science Organizations, GSI/FAIR will immediately suspend  all cooperation with Russian state institutions and business enterprises. Ongoing bilateral cooperation projects with researchers from Russian institutions will be suspended with immediate effect, furthermore we will not conclude any new bilateral cooperation projects. For multilateral projects involving Russia, which include the FAIR project, GSI/FAIR will coordinate with the other partners regarding further implementation of the international agreements. Adjustments of the measures will be made depending on the further development of the situation.

We are very saddened and concerned by the tragic events in the Ukraine. Also at GSI/FAIR, employees are affected by the war in Ukraine, whether directly, because families or friends live in the contested areas, or through professional or personal ties to Ukraine or Russia. Our thoughts go to all the people who are affected directly or indirectly, with our deepest sympathy and support in these difficult times.

 

Prof. Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director GSI/FAIR

Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director GSI/FAIR

Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director GSI/FAIR

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5238 Tue, 01 Mar 2022 12:00:57 +0100 "Scientist of the Year” Award 2021 at the Goethe University Frankfurt goes to theoretical physicist Hannah Elfner https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5238&cHash=5d08fd9165993d5c7b6784a60c622c56 The physicist Professor Dr. Hannah Elfner studies processes involving the very smallest particles in the universe, in particular strongly interacting particle in extreme conditions of temperature and density, when they form the so-called quark-gluon plasma, a state which was probably prevalent in the Universe shortly after the big Bang. For her outstanding research on these processes, which allow us to better understand the evolution of the Universe in its first instants, the physicist is now being honored This news is based on a press release of Goethe-University Frankfurt

The physicist Professor Dr. Hannah Elfner studies processes involving the very smallest particles in the universe, in particular strongly interacting particle in extreme conditions of temperature and density, when they form the so-called quark-gluon plasma, a state which was probably prevalent in the Universe shortly after the big Bang. For her outstanding research on these processes, which allow us to better understand the evolution of the Universe in its first instants, the physicist is now being honored by the Alfons and Gertrud Kassel Foundation as "Scientist of the Year" 2021 at the Goethe University Frankfurt. Hannah Elfner conducts research and teaches at Goethe University in Frankfurt and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt.

Mechanical engineer, pilot or physicist? The fact that Hannah Elfner decided to study physics after graduating from high school and that she was then soon determined to research the quark-gluon plasma is a stroke of luck for this field of research. For in her award-winning dissertation, the physicist already pointed out that the sequences in the quark-gluon plasma are far more complex than was assumed at the time. In 2016, she received the prestigious Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Prize for Young Scientists, among other prizes, for further insights into the extremely brief moment after the Big Bang.

At that time, she had already been researching for four years as Helmholtz Young Investigator in Frankfurt how heavy ion collisions, which experimental physicists can use to simulate processes after the Big Bang and in which the quark-gluon plasma is created, can be described with mathematical models. Appointed as one of the youngest female physics professors in Germany, Elfner occupies a dual position at the Goethe University, the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS). In the meantime, she teaches and conducts research in a joint permanent professorship of Goethe University and GSI, where she is involved in the "Elements" cluster project, among other things. For a few months now, she has also been coordinating the theory department at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, where she previously headed a Helmholtz Young Investigator Group for several years.

Hannah Elfner is also a stroke of luck for her team of young scientists. In the laudation for the "Scientist of the Year" award, former and current employees impressively describe the individual attention that the physics professor gives to each and every one of her students and doctoral candidates - which is one of the reasons why Hannah Elfner is now being honored as "Scientist of the Year". University President Enrico Schleiff says: "Ms. Elfner is an excellent young scientist who is very committed to her subject and her team and whose expertise makes an ideal contribution to our research priorities. That this commitment is appreciated and supported by the Kassel Foundation naturally makes me particularly happy."

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, also congratulates warmly on the award: "I am delighted about this special recognition of Hannah Elfner's scientific work. The theory department at GSI/FAIR, which Prof Elfner now leads, is an essential element for the overall success of our research Institution, constantly in close interaction with the experimental activities. The future accelerator center FAIR will provide researchers with unprecedented opportunities to study key processes defining our universe. Hannah Elfner's work is an important building block in this regard, providing essential tools for the understanding of the experimental result."

The Alfons and Gertrud Kassel Foundation awards the "Scientist of the Year" prize every two years to researchers at the Goethe University in Frankfurt and its related institutions who, in addition to their own outstanding scientific work, have also rendered outstanding services to the promotion of young scientists. Part of the prize money of 25,000 euros is therefore also to be used to promote young scientists. The award ceremony planned for early December has now been postponed until spring due to the pandemic. (BP/GU)

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5236 Thu, 24 Feb 2022 09:00:00 +0100 Professor Dr. Paolo Giubellino starts second term as Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5236&cHash=9394daa0ac1f1a57a9bccbcba5e53a7e Professor Giubellino will continue to lead the world-class scientific program of GSI and FAIR as Scientific Managing Director of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH) for the next five years. The FAIR Council and the GSI Supervisory Board, impressed by the achievements in his first term, have expressed their wish for him to serve for a second term that started on January 1, 2022. Professor Giubellino will continue to lead the world-class scientific program of GSI and FAIR as Scientific Managing Director of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH) for the next five years. The FAIR Council and the GSI Supervisory Board, impressed by the achievements in his first term, have expressed their wish for him to serve for a second term that started on January 1, 2022.

The FAIR Council and the GSI Supervisory Board are delighted that the international renowned scientist and former CERN experiment leader Professor Giubellino has accepted their proposal to stay in his position as Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR. “We are convinced that with Professor Giubellino's leadership, the GSI/FAIR site will continue to stand for excellent science at the highest international level and will further expand this position in the coming years. The promising preparations of the future research operations at the FAIR facility are the result of the great commitment of the employees of GSI and FAIR, but in particular also his merit. In this context, the excellent research results of FAIR Phase 0 speak for themselves,” emphasized Ministerialdirigent Dr. Volkmar Dietz, who is director at the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the Chair of the GSI Supervisory Board and the FAIR Council.

Professor Giubellino looks forward to his second term with enthusiastic motivation. “The coming years are decisive for firmly shaping the science at FAIR as one of the top scientific laboratories in the world, involving the wide international FAIR scientific community. FAIR has an enormous potential to produce ground breaking results in a broad range of research areas. For me as a scientist it is a unique opportunity to work for its success”. As important goals for his upcoming term, he names to further define the science opportunities at FAIR and GSI and to create the conditions that the experimenters need for cutting-edge research.

In the recent years, Professor Giubellino led FAIR's scientific program into its first implementation, the so-called FAIR Phase 0, which enabled a restart of on-campus research at GSI/FAIR, allowing the scientific community to reach top science results and to strengthen their attachment to the campus. This first stage of the experimental program has been writing success stories for three years, even under difficult corona conditions: Thanks to the detectors and instrumentation already developed by the large international FAIR collaborations and the improved particle accelerators, it is already possible to enter new physics territory. The scientific output is impressively strong, many scientific milestones have been achieved, and numerous prestigious national and international prizes have been awarded to researchers at GSI and FAIR.

Together with Dr. Ulrich Breuer as Administrative Managing Director and Jörg Blaurock as Technical Managing Director, Professor Giubellino will continue to steer GSI and FAIR. In Professor Giubellino's second term, his focus will be on getting the experiments ready for the start of the FAIR facility. The promotion of young scientists for FAIR will also continue to play a decisive role, in close ties with partner universities in Hesse and Germany, through targeted international agreements and the establishment of support programs to pave the way for highly qualified young scientific and technical personnel to join GSI/FAIR. The international focus and visibility of GSI/FAIR is to be consistently advanced, according to Professor Giubellino, who, in addition to his scientific expertise, has extensive experience with international collaborations and has already assumed many key roles in multilateral research programs.

Since January 2017 Professor Giubellino is Scientific Managing Director of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research) and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH). The research track record of Paolo Giubellino is the physics of high-energy heavy ion collisions and the matter produced in them. After studying at Turin University and the University of California in Santa Cruz, he took part in many heavy-ion experiments at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN in Switzerland. Since the early 1990s, he has held several senior positions at CERN’s ALICE experiment. In 2011 Professor Giubellino was appointed Spokesperson of ALICE. He has also worked at the Torino section of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN) since 1985. For his work he has received numerous awards. Among other things, he received the Lise Meitner Prize of the European Physical Society in 2014 as well as the Enrico Fermi Prize, the highest award bestowed by the Italian Physical Society (2013). He is member of the Accademia delle Scienze di Torino, founded by the famous mathematician and astronomer Joseph-Louis Lagrange. In 2012 the Italian president awarded him the title of “Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana” for his scientific achievements. In 2016 he was elected into the Academia Europaea. (BP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5234 Mon, 21 Feb 2022 08:55:10 +0100 Hessian Minister for Europe Lucia Puttrich visits GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5234&cHash=4fa301aa9aa9d823b758e04959eeebb0 The progress of the FAIR project and the current scientific activities on campus were central topics during the visit to GSI and FAIR of the Minister of European and Federal Affairs and Representative of the State of Hessen at the Federal Government, Lucia Puttrich. She was welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, as well as ... The progress of the FAIR project and the current scientific activities on campus were central topics during the visit to GSI and FAIR of the Minister of European and Federal Affairs and Representative of the State of Hessen at the Federal Government, Lucia Puttrich. She was welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, as well as Carola Pomplun from the Public Relations Department and Dr. Kathrin Göbel from the Joint Outreach Office.

After introductory information on the FAIR project, the campus development, previous research successes and current experiments, the CDU politician was given insights into the FAIR construction activities on the 20-hectare construction field in the east of the existing GSI and FAIR campus.

Minister for Europe Lucia Puttrich was impressed by the globally unique research project: "The international accelerator center FAIR is one of the most impressive research facilities in the world. In addition to the federal government and the state of Hesse, European research funding programs have also supported the GSI Helmholtzzentrum and FAIR for many years. More than 27 million euros come from European funding. With the new particle accelerator, one of the world's largest facilities for fundamental physics research is being built in our state. This makes Hesse one of the top locations for science in Europe. Scientists from all over the world can already use the research facilities today. This is international cooperation in science in daily life and I am proud that we have contributed to the success of the project with our intensive promotion in Berlin and Brussels," said Minister for Europe Lucia Puttrich.

During their visit the guests had the opportunity to get an overview of the entire construction site and the activities in the northern and southern construction areas from the viewing platform on the edge of the construction site. Then they took a tour of the site, in which also participated FAIR Site Manager Dr. Harald Hagelskamp, to get a close-up view of the construction progress. The agenda also included a walk-through of the underground accelerator tunnel, completed in shell construction, and the transfer building.

The transfer building is the most complex building of the facility and the central hub of the facility’s beam guidance system. The large, 1.1 kilometer ring accelerator SIS100 will be the heart of the future facility. The ring closure, which took place in 2021, represents an important milestone in the realization of the entire FAIR project, and installation of the technical building equipment will start in the near future.

The FAIR facility will provide researchers from all over the world with unique experimental opportunities to produce and examine cosmic matter in the laboratory that usually only exists in the depth of space. In giant planets, stars, and also during stellar explosions and collisions, matter is subject to extreme conditions such as very high temperatures, pressures and densities. FAIR will enable scientists to create such conditions in the laboratory. To do so, they will bombard small samples of matter with ions (electrically charged atoms). These collisions will, for very short periods of time, create the cosmic matter at the tiny impact points. Scientists can thus gain new insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe, from the Big Bang to the present day. They also develop new applications in medicine and technology. (BP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5229 Fri, 18 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0100 ALICE Masterclass is part of the International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2022 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5229&cHash=ead6e5a097f4cc959a25b32f99f3b51f On February 11, the United Nations called for the seventh International Day of Women and Girls in Science to raise awareness and visibility to equal participation and to the achievements of female scientists. To mark the occasion, scientists of the ALICE experiment invited female high-school students interested in physics nationwide to participate in an online workshop. On February 11, the United Nations called for the seventh International Day of Women and Girls in Science to raise awareness and visibility to equal participation and to the achievements of female scientists. To mark the occasion, scientists of the ALICE experiment invited female high-school students interested in physics nationwide to participate in an online workshop. In addition to researchers from the Universities of Münster, Munich and Frankfurt, five representatives of the ALICE research department of GSI/FAIR were also involved in the event.

Within the framework of the ALICE Masterclass, 44 female students gained an insight into the work of physicists and into data evaluation. Under the expert guidance of the scientists, they analyzed measurement data from the ALICE experiment by themselves and discussed their findings in an international video conference with researchers at CERN, in India and in Greece.

ALICE is one of the four large-scale experiments at the LHC collider at the CERN research center in Geneva and deals in particular with heavy ion collisions of lead atomic nuclei. When lead atomic nuclei collide with unimaginable impact in the LHC, conditions are created similar to the first moments of the universe. During the collisions, a so-called quark-gluon plasma is created for a very short time - a state of matter that existed in the universe shortly after the Big Bang. This plasma transforms back into normal matter within fractions of a second. The particles produced in the process provide information about the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. Thus, the measurements can peer into the birth of the cosmos and reveal information about the basic building blocks of matter and their interactions. (CP)

Further information
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Aktuelles
news-5227 Wed, 16 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0100 Erwin Schrödinger Prize 2021: Breakthrough for nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5227&cHash=0f584edcf03f168c947806b39bb18686 The “Erwin Schrödinger Prize 2021 — The Stifterverband Science Award” goes to an international team at the Helmholtz Institute Mainz HIM, a cooperation of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research and the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz: With the cost-effective and extraordinary amplification of magnetic resonance signals, the experts have developed a technique that has promising uses in analytics. The “Erwin Schrödinger Prize 2021 — The Stifterverband Science Award” goes to an international team at the Helmholtz Institute Mainz HIM, a cooperation of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research and the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz: With the cost-effective and extraordinary amplification of magnetic resonance signals, the experts have developed a technique that has promising uses in analytics.

For the production of a newly developed and improved contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hydrogen gas, the scientists* Dmitry Budker (physicist, HIM), James Eills (chemist, HIM), John Blanchard (chemist, HIM), Danila Barskiy (physical chemist, HIM), Kerstin Münnemann (chemist, University of Kaiserslautern), Francesca Reineri (chemist, University of Turin), Eleonora Cavallari (pharmaceutical and biomolecular scientist, University of Turin), Silvio Aime (biological scientist, University of Turin), Gerd Buntkowsky (physical chemist, TU Darmstadt), Stephan Knecht (physicist, TU Darmstadt and NVision, Ulm), Malcolm H. Levitt (chemist, University of Southampton) and Laurynas Dagys (chemist, University of Southampton) receive the Erwin Schrödinger Prize, which is endowed with 50,000 euros.

Nuclear magnetic resonance is one of the standard analytical methods used to determine the structure and dynamics of materials and living objects. Including magnetic resonance imaging, the method is used in chemistry, biochemistry and medicine, among other fields. In both methods, liquids are particularly well suited as contrast agents for examination. However, the methods used to date have reached their limits: The interaction of nuclear spins with their environment is very weak and the methods therefore have low sensitivity. This is where the new development comes in: To overcome this limitation, researchers have developed a series of so-called “hyperpolarization techniques”. These are chemical and physical techniques that can be used to prepare atoms and molecules in such a way that their magnetic resonance signals are amplified by a factor of about a million at a low cost.

Hyperpolarization techniques are complex and can currently only be used in a few clinics worldwide. This project only became possible thanks to the cooperation of a team of chemists, physicists, engineers, biologists and clinical practitioners. The team is made up of experts from Germany, England, Italy and the USA, and includes the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, the Helmholtz Institute Mainz, the Technical University of Darmstadt, the Technical University of Kaiserslautern, the University of Southampton and the University of Turin. The Helmholtz Institute Mainz, where the award winners conduct research, is jointly supported by the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt and the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

“The goal of our scientific work is to provide easy-to-produce, safe and long-lived hyperpolarized molecules for both medical applications and research purposes,” says Dmitry Budker, Professor of Experimental Atomic Physics at the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Section Head at the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM). “Our method represents a major step and a decisive improvement in this process. We were able to achieve this through interdisciplinary and transnational collaboration. We are very pleased and proud that our long-standing and intensive research collaboration has been recognized with the prestigious Erwin Schrödinger Prize.”

Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Director of GSI and FAIR, says: “The impressive results of this outstanding research team vividly demonstrate the overarching importance of close global networking in the scientific community. The Helmholtz Institute Mainz offers the researchers in this special collaboration an environment to enable top performance. I am therefore delighted and proud that this great scientific achievement is being honored with the Erwin Schrödinger Prize and convey my congratulations to all the researchers involved.”

“The impressive research work of this international winning team shows once again what science can achieve when it collaborates across disciplines and national borders,” says Otmar D. Wiestler, President of the Helmholtz Association. “The enormous amplification of magnetic resonance signals represents a crucial improvement for medical applications. I extend my heartfelt congratulations to the award winners.” 

“The internationally staffed research team has done an outstanding job of successfully bringing together expertise from different areas of the natural sciences,” said Michael Kaschke, president of the Stifterverband. “This highly committed, interdisciplinary approach has improved magnetic resonance imaging analytics for medicine and research in a decisive way. It is precisely these outstanding projects that we want to honor and make visible with this award.”

With the Erwin Schrödinger Prize, Helmholtz and the Stifterverband jointly honor outstanding scientific achievements. The prize is intended to honor interdisciplinary research that has been achieved in border areas between different subjects of medicine, natural sciences and engineering and with participation of representatives of at least two disciplines. (CP)

Further information
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Presse Aktuelles
news-5225 Thu, 10 Feb 2022 11:00:00 +0100 Successful start: Series production of SIS100 superconducting quadrupole units and quadrupole modules has begun https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5225&cHash=660c743aba415684459c0b6f2c1fb3e4 In the large ring accelerator SIS100, the heart of the future accelerator center FAIR, various unique and custom-made magnets and entire magnet systems will ensure that the ion beam is precisely guided and focused. Series production of a crucial magnet group, the quadrupole modules, has recently started. In the large ring accelerator SIS100, the heart of the future accelerator center FAIR, various unique and custom-made magnets and entire magnet systems will ensure that the ion beam is precisely guided and focused. Series production of a crucial magnet group, the quadrupole modules, has recently started.

In addition to the superconducting dipole modules, the superconducting quadrupole modules are among the most important components of the SIS100. While there are only two different types of dipole modules, the series of quadrupole modules comprises eleven different types. Of these, two modules, for the areas of injection and extraction, have a particularly sophisticated mechanical design. Series production and cold testing of the 110 dipole modules were successfully completed in 2021, and has now begun for the quadrupole modules.

Essential components of the very complex quadrupole modules are the superconducting quadrupole units. Each module includes two quadrupole units. In addition to the quadrupole magnets in various configurations required for beam focusing, these also contain superconducting correction magnets, for example the "steerer" magnets required for path correction or sextupole magnets for correcting chromaticity, i.e. focusing differences caused by the energy distribution of the particles in the beam. These correction magnets are supplemented by additional superconducting magnets placed at the ends of the arcs.

All superconducting focusing and correction magnets are manufactured as a Russian Inkind contribution at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. The development of the magnet technology was carried out jointly by GSI and JINR during the project's preliminary phase. While the further developed Nuclotron cable is used in the quadrupole magnets as well as in the dipole magnets, a new, special superconducting cable with insulated strands had to be developed for the correction magnets. The design of the various quadrupole units, based on the joint development, is carried out by the GSI design office.

All quadrupole units are tested in Dubna in both warm and cold conditions. For the cold test at 4 Kelvin (which corresponds to 4 degrees Celsius above absolute zero at around -273 degrees), a cryogenic test facility comprising six test benches was previously set up under a collaboration agreement. This facility is used to test both the superconducting magnets of the future accelerator center FAIR being built at GSI in Darmstadt and the NICA accelerator facility currently being built at JINR in Dubna.

After extensive acceptance tests, all quadrupole units manufactured in Dubna will be shipped to Bilfinger Noell in Würzburg, which has been contracted to integrate the quadrupole modules. In addition to the quadrupole units from Dubna, GSI provides numerous other cryogenic components for integration, such as beam position monitors, ion catchers, and thin wall quadrupole chambers, among many others. The production of these components was previously ordered by GSI from various companies. The most important task here is the synchronization of all activities in time, a special challenge due to the technical complexity of the trades.

In parallel, negotiations were held with the Italian National Nuclear Physics Institute (INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) for the use of the superconducting test facility in Salerno for the SIS100 project and a collaboration agreement was signed. The series of SIS100 quadrupole modules integrated at Bilfinger Noell will be tested at the test facility.

After successful implementation of the high quality standards and quality assurance standards at JINR, the successful start of series production at JINR and series integration at Bilfinger Noell was achieved. 26 quadrupole units could be manufactured and tested at JINR in 2021 and provided to Bilfinger Noell for integration. At the same time, the integration of the modules was parallelized at Bilfinger Noell. GSI will accompany the cold testing of the series modules in Salerno by testing about 20 integrated quadrupole modules at the "Series Test Facility" (STF) on the Darmstadt campus. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5223 Tue, 08 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0100 ERC Starting Grant for CRYRING research awarded to Dr. Carlo Bruno https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5223&cHash=70f75cce0df7708f4aee46687495a1c5 Another ERC Grant has been awarded for research closely connected with FAIR and GSI. Dr. Carlo Bruno, a Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of Edinburgh (UK), is one of the 397 researchers across Europe to receive a so-socalled ERC Starting Grant this year. His project “Elements in the Lives and Deaths of stARs (ELDAR)“ will address how stars synthesize new elements and how these elements are disseminated into our galaxy. Another ERC Grant has been awarded for research closely connected with FAIR and GSI. Dr. Carlo Bruno, a Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of Edinburgh (UK), is one of the 397 researchers across Europe to receive a so-socalled ERC Starting Grant this year. His project “Elements in the Lives and Deaths of stARs (ELDAR)“ will address how stars synthesize new elements and how these elements are disseminated into our galaxy. First experiments in the framework of ELDAR have already been approved at the GSI/FAIR research facility.

Nuclear reactions taking place inside stars play a central role in their evolution. Measuring these reactions in laboratories here on Earth is needed to answer fundamental questions about the origin of the elements that make up our Universe. The ELDAR project will develop new approaches for charged-particle detection at two world-leading European laboratories, FAIR (Germany) and Gran Sasso (Italy), and forge new links between leading European science communities using different methods to study stellar scenarios that are intimately linked in nature.

At FAIR, ELDAR will use a novel and world-unique approach, studying reactions induced by stable and radioactive beams at the newly commissioned CRYRING@ESR heavy ion storage ring, using the recently installed CARME detector array. While the new FAIR accelerator is currently under construction, the CRYRING@ESR is already in operation at the existing accelerator facility of GSI and employed in the ongoing experimental program FAIR Phase 0. Measurement of reactions involving radioactive nuclei are critical to model and understand the wealth of new astronomical data from stellar explosions. ELDAR will make use of CRYRING@ESR to investigate key nuclear reactions that play an important role in stellar scenarios from the Big Bang to supernovae explosions.

At the low temperatures of slow stellar burning, nuclear reactions rates are too low to be detected above natural radioactive background on Earth. The LUNA accelerator, located underground at Gran Sasso, is the world-leading facility to study reactions that drive slow stellar evolution. ELDAR will build a new array to study charged-particle reactions at LUNA, making full use of the capabilities of this cutting-edge facility to study a key issue in globular clusters.

ERC Starting Grants support outstanding researchers at an early career stage showing great promise and an excellent research proposal under the EU’s Research and Innovation program, Horizon Europe. Grants worth on average €1.5 million will help ambitious researchers launch their own projects, form their teams of postdoctoral researchers and PhD students, and pursue their research ideas. Researchers from or closely connected to GSI and FAIR have been very successful in the past years in receiving ERC Starting or Advanced Grants. (CP)

Further information:
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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5221 Wed, 02 Feb 2022 11:21:40 +0100 Long-term drone video: Time-lapse of the FAIR construction site https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5221&cHash=146a138efbd102c8b127ad502da908c4 Great progress has been made and important stages have been completed on the FAIR project, one of the largest construction projects for research in the world. A new time-lapse video created with sophisticated filming technology makes the developments of the past four years at the construction site of the international particle accelerator facility particularly tangible. Great progress has been made and important stages have been completed on the FAIR project, one of the largest construction projects for research in the world. A new time-lapse video created with sophisticated filming technology makes the developments of the past four years at the construction site of the international particle accelerator facility particularly tangible.

Using a sophisticated filming technique that is not yet widely available, a time-lapse video was shot from the air showing the development of the past four years: For this so-called "Longterm Dronelapse", a drone was used to regularly fly the same routes over the huge construction site. The moving time-lapse videos filmed in the process over the course of four years have now been combined into a single video. Thanks to GPS support, they can be precisely superimposed so that the progress of construction activities becomes particularly clear.

Last year's Longterm Dronelapse, showing the development of 2018 to 2020, was awarded the "Intermedia-globe SILVER Award" by the World Media Festival. The jury of the "WorldMediaFestival | Television & Corporate Media Awards" judged the video to be an outstanding contribution in the category "Public Relations/Research and Science" and presented the "Intermedia-globe SILVER Award" for it. (LW)

More Information

Video: FAIR construction site in time-lapse - Longterm Dronelapse
News on Intermedia-globe SILVER Award

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5219 Tue, 01 Feb 2022 10:12:02 +0100 Member of the Hessian parliament Oliver Stirböck visits GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5219&cHash=76a579c00a3c2efed501c4dd16fe5d8e Oliver Stirböck, member of the Hessian parliament, recently visited GSI and FAIR. One of the main topics was the energy-efficient supercomputing center Green IT Cube. He was welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, as well as Dr. Helmut Kreiser, Group Manager DataCenter/Green IT Cube and Carola Pomplun from the Public Relations Departm Oliver Stirböck, member of the Hessian parliament, recently visited GSI and FAIR. One of the main topics was the energy-efficient supercomputing center Green IT Cube. He was welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, as well as Dr. Helmut Kreiser, Group Manager DataCenter/Green IT Cube and Carola Pomplun from the Public Relations Department of GSI and FAIR.

Following introductory information on the status of the FAIR construction project, the campus development, previous research successes and current experiments, the FDP politician, who was accompanied by Patrick Schütz, staff member of his constituency office, was given insights into the research facilities at GSI/FAIR and the FAIR construction activities. Oliver Stirböck is his parliamentary group's spokesman for digitization, for European policy and for Frankfurt as a financial site.

One central topic of the visit was sustainable digitalization. During a guided tour of the Green IT Cube, the guests were informed comprehensively about the high-performance data center and its infrastructure. The Green IT Cube on the GSI/FAIR campus provides enormous computing capacities for experiments at the accelerator facilities of GSI and, in the future, FAIR. It is one of the most capable scientific computing centers in the world. At the same time, it sets standards in IT technology and energy saving: Thanks to a special cooling system, it is particularly energy- and cost-efficient. Therefore, the energy required for cooling is less than seven percent of the electrical power used for computing. In conventional data centers with air cooling, this relation amounts to 30 up to 100 percent. The innovative cooling system also enables a compact and space-saving design. The Green IT Cube has already received numerous awards, including the Blue Angel, the eco label of the German government.

After the tour of the Green IT Cube, the guests had the opportunity to learn about the large experiment HADES and the current status of the FAIR construction project. They were able to see the progress on the construction site directly from the viewing platform and to take a look at the 20-hectare FAIR construction site with the completed ring tunnel of the large accelerator ring SIS100, the heart of the future accelerator facility. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5217 Wed, 26 Jan 2022 09:00:00 +0100 Amplified signal and extreme sensitivity: on the trail of light dark matter particles https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5217&cHash=160652619456075f74efdd2acb63e700 An international team of researchers with participation of the Cluster of Excellence PRISMA+ of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) has successfully advanced a laboratory method to search for extremely light “axion-like” particles (ALPs), which are possible canditates for being the elusive dark matter. The researchers use nuclear magnetic resonance techniques in their experiments: by using a new setup, they have now been able to increase the sensitivity by This news is based on a press release by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

An international team of researchers with participation of the Cluster of Excellence PRISMA+ of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) has successfully advanced a laboratory method to search for extremely light “axion-like” particles (ALPs), which are possible canditates for being the elusive dark matter. The researchers use nuclear magnetic resonance techniques in their experiments: by using a new setup, they have now been able to increase the sensitivity by five orders of magnitude compared to previous experiments, as they show in their article in Nature Physics, a leading journal in the field.

Little is known about the exact nature of dark matter. Today, extremely light bosonic particles, such as the so-called axions, axion-like particles, and dark photons, are considered to be promising candidates. These can be regarded as a classical field oscillating at a certain frequency. How large this frequency - and consequently the mass of the particles - is, is not yet known. That is why the researchers are systematically searching different frequency ranges with their experiments for evidence of dark matter. “There is still a lot of work to be done, because we have not yet checked a large mass range for ALPs,” says Prof. Dr. Dmitry Budker, a principal investigator at PRISMA+ and Section Leader at HIM, an institutional cooperation of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. “In doing so, we continue to rely on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance, i.e., the fact that nuclear spins respond to magnetic fields that oscillate at a certain resonance frequency. We determine the strength of this resonance signal with a sensitive magnetometer.”

The basic premise of the experiments: A dark matter field also affects the nuclear spins of a sensor in this way. As the Earth moves through this field, the nuclear spins in the sensor behave exactly as they would in an oscillating magnetic field. The result is a nuclear spin signal caused by dark matter.

The Mainz scientists and their colleagues at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) use the noble gas xenon, or more precisely the isotope xenon-129, as a sensor. The magnetometer, which measures potential signals, is based on the element rubidium. There are two main special characteristics here: “We set up the experiment in such a way that the xenon atoms first amplify an oscillating field: so the effect triggered by a potential ALP field would be a factor of 100 larger,” describes co-author Antoine Garcon, a PhD student at HIM. “Moreover, our magnetometer - that is, the readout unit - is located in the same cell as the sensor gas, xenon. The stronger contact between the two, in addition to the stronger signal, increases the sensitivity of the measurement.”

“This is more or less the same principle underlying our ‘Cosmic Axion Spin Precession Experiment’ research program - CASPEr for short - a collaboration between PRISMA+/HIM and Boston University in the US. However, the details of the technical implementation are quite different,” explains Dmitry Budker.

In the current work, the cooperation partners first showed that their idea basically works: They apply a weak oscillating magnetic field to simulate an ALP field and can thus detect the predicted signals exactly. In the next step, they determine the sensitivity of their experimental setup. As a result, it is five orders of magnitude better than in previous experiments.

After successful proof-of-principle, the scientists started the first series of measurements to search for dark matter. They were able to survey the mass range from a few femtoelectronvolts (feV) to almost 800 feV. Although they have not yet been able to find an ALP signal in this range, the much higher sensitivity has enabled them to formulate new and stringent limits with respect to the strength of the ALP interaction with normal matter. In addition, they were able to extend the search range by an order of magnitude towards higher masses compared to the earlier CASPEr experiments - further narrowing the search range for ALPs after the exclusion procedure. The setup could also be used for the search for dark photons. And here, too, the research team has succeeded in setting appropriate limits. Longer measurement times could further improve the sensitivity of their method, as the authors explain in Nature Physics.

A very similar experimental setup is described in another paper recently published in Science Advances. Again, Dmitry Budker is involved: “We use essentially the same spin amplifier, but for a different purpose. Instead of looking for the dark matter field, we are looking for a possible exotic interaction between a mass source and nuclear spins - a ‘fifth force,’ so to speak. The exotic interactions would arise from the existence of ‘new’ particles, which in turn might have a connection to dark matter.” In any case, in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model, the new method offers exciting new approaches and perspectives. (JGU/BP)

Further information

Link to publication in Nature Physics

Group of Professor Budker

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5214 Thu, 20 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0100 Dr. Daria Kostyleva receives FAIR-GSI PhD Award 2021 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5214&cHash=df26469af707bde7f1ad778086aa776e The FAIR-GSI PhD Award 2021 went to Dr. Daria Kostyleva. The award was presented recently during a virtual colloquium by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of FAIR and GSI, and Daniel Sälzer, Managing Director of Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH. This annual award is sponsored by Pfeiffer Vacuum and endowed with 1000 euros. The FAIR-GSI PhD Award 2021 went to Dr. Daria Kostyleva. The award was presented recently during a virtual colloquium by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of FAIR and GSI, and Daniel Sälzer, Managing Director of Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH. This annual award is sponsored by Pfeiffer Vacuum and endowed with 1000 euros.

In her doctoral thesis, which she completed at the Justus Liebig University of Giessen in the research group of Professor Christoph Scheidenberger, Dr. Daria Kostyleva used a novel experimental method that allowed her to study atomic nuclei at the limits of stability, their internal structure as well as some of their characteristic properties such as lifetime, ground state and excited levels. To this end, nuclear reactions at the fragment separator FRS at GSI were used to produce very neutron-deficient argon, potassium, and chlorine isotopes, which are extremely short-lived: some of them have lifetimes as short as 10-12 seconds (which is a trillionth of a second) or even shorter.

Because of their short lifetimes, these atomic nuclei decay in flight, emitting one, two, or three protons while transitioning to a more stable, longer-lived configuration. The protons can be detected with a special detector arrangement that Dr. Kostyleva contributed to develop. For the first time, this experimental method was used to detect the three-proton decay of an atomic nucleus: on 31K, a potassium atom with mass number 31, consisting of 19 protons and only 12 neutrons. Also for the first time, the detection of some previously unknown isotopes — 28Cl, 30Cl, 29Ar, and the aforementioned nuclide 31K — was successful. For other nuclides, two-proton radioactivity was observed, a particular decay mechanism discovered at GSI in the early 2000s. For some of the studied nuclei, it was even possible to derive a level scheme, i.e., to describe the internal structure that forms under these extreme conditions.

Half-lives, binding energies and a wealth of other information could also be determined in a single experiment. These findings are particularly noteworthy because Dr. Kostyleva's experiments, to date, extend the farthest beyond the so-called proton dripline. As such, they provide a first insight into areas far beyond nuclear stability and into novel phenomena with the potential to our picture of the structure of atomic nuclei. The experiments open a perspective to gain a deeper understanding of the transition from the ordering effect of nuclear forces in atomic nuclei to a structureless assembly of nucleons at the dripline. The super-conducting Fragment Separator (Super-FRS), currently under construction at the international FAIR facility, is expected to provide further insights.

The annual FAIR-GSI PhD Award honors an excellent PhD thesis completed during the previous year. Eligible for nominations are dissertations that were supported by GSI in the context of its strategic partnerships with the universities of Darmstadt, Frankfurt, Giessen, Heidelberg, Jena, and Mainz, or through the research and development program. In the framework of the Graduate School HGS-HIRe (Helmholtz Graduate School for Hadron and Ion Research), more than 300 PhD students currently perform research for their PhD theses on topics closely related to GSI and FAIR. GSI has a long-standing partnership with the award sponsor, Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH, which offers vacuum technology and pumps. Vacuum solutions from Pfeiffer Vacuum have been successfully used in GSI's facilities for decades. (CP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5211 Tue, 11 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0100 FAIR Day Slovenia: Jožef Stefan Institute organizes virtual event under the motto "Academia meets Business” https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5211&cHash=65329dbeeec7c1fabdedae785a352662 Recently, representatives of GSI/FAIR participated in the virtual "FAIR Day Slovenia" of the Jožef Stefan Institute. "Academia meets Business" was the motto of the workshop. The meeting's objective was to bring together scientists, technical experts, industry partners and the funding agency. The aim was also to outline the progress of the civil construction and the achievements of the FAIR's precursor program FAIR Phase 0, as well as to inform about Slovenia's participation at FAIR on all fronts (scientific, technical and human resources) and future work plans. At the workshop "Academia meets Business", the Jožef Stefan Institute and the University of Ljubljana signed a GET_INvolved Partnership agreement with GSI/FAIR leading to more opportunities for training of future scientist and engineers.

The guest of honor, Dr. Tomaž Boh, Director-General Science Directorate, Ministry of Education, Science and Sport, Republic of Slovenia, welcomed all participants to the Workshop. Professor Boštjan Zalar, Director of the Jožef Stefan Institute, delivered a welcome speech. Dr. Albin Kralj from the Ministry of Education, Science and Sport, Republic of Slovenia, greeted the participants. The Scientific Managing Director of FAIR and GSI, Professor Paolo Giubellino, and the Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, informed the workshop participants on the scientific objectives, the status and the recent advances of the FAIR project to kick off the information session. Dr. Jürgen Gerl of NUSTAR collaboration, one of the four experimental pillars of FAIR, and Dr. Jelena Vesić of the Jožef Stefan Institute presented the Slovenian contribution to the NUSTAR experiments.

In addition to the Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI), the event also involved representatives of the Ministry of Education, Science and Sport and “Tehnodrom d.o.o.” with leading companies Cosylab and Instrumentation Technologies, as FAIR will play a significant role in the growth of the high-tech industry. Janko Bugar, CGO & Senior Business Development Manager, Cosylab, and Elvis Janežič, CEO, Instrumentation Technologies, presented all activities and contributions from the Tehnodrom consortium Slovenian companies participating in the FAIR project. The Workshop allowed the exchange of valuable information on the present status of activities at Campus GSI/FAIR and highlighted scientific and technical developments on the Slovenian side.

At the event it was highlighted how FAIR, in addition to promoting scientific research, is also of significance to the growth of the high-tech industry for Slovenia. Thus, many Slovenian high-tech companies develop and construct technological equipment through the consortium Tehnodrom. The leading partners in the consortium Tehnodrom are Cosylab and Instrumentation Technologies. Participation in the FAIR Project opens up exceptional research opportunities for Slovenian scientists and thus also extraordinary opportunities for cooperation with the Slovenian economy to develop new technologies and other products with high added value. (BP)

Further information

For more information on the GET_INvolved Programme, interested persons can contact the respective coordinators: Dr. Pradeep Ghosh (GSI and FAIR, Pradeep.Ghosh@fair-center.eu), Dr. Jelena Vesić (Jožef Stefan Institute, Jelena.Vesic@ijs.si) und Prof. Dr. Simon Širca (University of Ljubljana, Simon.Sirca@fmf.uni-lj.si).

About the Jožef-Stefan-Institute

The Jožef Stefan Institute is the leading Slovenian scientific research institute, covering a broad spectrum of basic and applied research. Natural sciences, biological sciences, and engineering are among the specialties of the team of roughly 1000 people. Production and control technologies, communication and computer technologies, knowledge technologies, biotechnologies, new materials, environmental technologies, nanotechnology, and nuclear engineering are among the topics covered. The Jožef Stefan Institute's aim is to accumulate - and disseminate - knowledge at the frontiers of natural science and technology for the benefit of society at large by pursuing education, learning, research, and high-tech development at the highest worldwide levels of quality.

About the University of Ljubljana

The University of Ljubljana is the oldest and largest higher education and scientific research institution in Slovenia. The university, which has a long history, was founded in 1919. It is Slovenia's biggest and most important educational institution. With 30 percent of all registered researchers, it is one of Slovenian biggest research institutions. In 23 faculties and three art academies, it has over 37,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students and employs approximately 6,000 higher education instructors, researchers, assistants, and administrative employees.

About the GET_INvolved Programme

The GET_INvolved Programme provides international students and early-stage researchers from partner institutions with opportunities to perform internships, traineeships and early-stage research experience to get involved in the international FAIR accelerator project while receiving scientific and technical training.

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5207 Wed, 22 Dec 2021 07:19:00 +0100 Visualize the invisible — Lecture Series “Wissenschaft für Alle” of GSI and FAIR remains online in 2022 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5207&cHash=62efbf158fb8b3a6beb28f21a25dac45 The new program of the lecture series “Wissenschaft für Alle” of GSI and FAIR for the first term of 2022 has made it its motto to visualize the invisible. It is about the small and big aspects in microscopy and space as well as about possibilities to make information perceptible and tangible. The series will continue in an online format until further notice; interested parties can connect to the video conference events via a dial-up link using an internet-enabled device such as a laptop, cell phone ... The new program of the lecture series “Wissenschaft für Alle” of GSI and FAIR for the first term of 2022 has made it its motto to visualize the invisible. It is about the small and big aspects in microscopy and space as well as about possibilities to make information perceptible and tangible. The series will continue in an online format until further notice; interested parties can connect to the video conference events via a dial-up link using an internet-enabled device such as a laptop, cell phone or tablet. The program begins on Wednesday, January 19, 2022, with the lecture “Gestaltet, was Euch gestaltet! Oder: Für mein Gehirn bin ich selbst verantwortlich.” by Dr. Konrad Lehmann, aiming to make the processes in our brain recognizable.

Why am I who I am? Is my personality genetically determined? Is my destiny fixed with conception? Or do I have a chance to change myself actively and independently? Yes, say systemic neurobiology and psychology today: In all stages of life, the environment influences the brain and thus the development and shaping of our personality. Whether we grow up and live in a diverse and green or a non-stimulating environment, whether we are socially secure or uprooted, even subtle influences such as light and month of birth have a measurable and sometimes significant impact on brain and personality.

In his lecture, Dr. Konrad Lehmann shows that you are the master of yourself, and how you can always take control of your own life by changing your environment. We have the possibility to change ourselves through our environment. We are free in our decisions and our personality and therefore responsible for our own brain. The modern understanding of the brain combines freedom, openness and responsibility. Lehmann calls this idea "neuro-humanism", and sets it against the doctrine of the heteronomy of man.

Dr. Konrad Lehmann calls himself a “brain communicator”; he teaches brains about the brain, so to speak. He studied biology at the University of Bielefeld and received his doctorate with a thesis in neurobiology. Since 2006, he has conducted research on the brain's adaptability and learning mechanisms at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, where he completed his habilitation in 2011. Since September 2019, he works at GSI/FAIR as a laboratory manager in the Biophysics Department. His research broadly revolves around how the mammalian brain adapts to different environmental conditions. In addition to a number of scientific publications, he has authored several books on the subject.

Other lectures in the course of the semester will focus, for example, on phenomena of the universe that evade our direct perception: black holes and dark matter. Two presentations will also deal with making tiny things visible via microscopy or making radioactivity visible at all. Finally, two lectures on machine learning in biomedicine and computer visualization will deal with the processing of data.

The German lectures will each begin at 2 p.m. For more information on access and the schedule of the event, please visit the event website at www.gsi.de/wfa.

The lecture series “Wissenschaft für Alle” is aimed at anyone interested in current science and research. The lectures will report on research and developments at GSI and FAIR, but also on current topics from other fields of science and technology. The aim of the series is to prepare and present scientific processes in a way that is understandable to people outside the field, thus making research accessible to a broad audience. The lectures are given by GSI and FAIR staff or by external speakers from universities and research institutes. (CP)

Current program:

  • Wednesday, January 19, 2022, 2 p.m.
    Gestaltet, was Euch gestaltet! Oder: Für mein Gehirn bin ich selbst verantwortlich.
    Konrad Lehmann, GSI/FAIR
     
  • Wednesday, February 16, 2022, 2 p.m.
    Schwarze Löcher und wie sie zu sehen sind
    Christoph Schürmann, Universität Bonn
     
  • Wednesday, March 16, 2022, 2 p.m.
    Machine Learning in der Biomedizin – Beispiele und Perspektiven
    Fabian Theis, Helmholtz Zentrum München
     
  • Wednesday, April 27, 2022, 2 p.m.
    Neue Entwicklungen zu Nachweis und Sichtbarmachung von radioaktiver Strahlung
    Kai Vetter, University of California Berkeley/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
     
  • Wednesday, May 25, 2022, 2 p.m.
    Ein Bild sagt mehr als 1000 Daten – Wie Computervisualisierung unser Leben leichter machen kann
    Pascal Bormann, Fraunhofer-Institut für Graphische Datenverarbeitung, Darmstadt
     
  • Wednesday, June 15, 2022, 2 p.m.
    Das Rätsel der Dunklen Materie: Dem unsichtbaren Universum auf der Spur
    Kathrin Valerius, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie KIT
     
  • Wednesday, July 20, 2022, 2 p.m.
    Ich sehe was, was du nicht siehst – Mikroskopie in der Strahlenbiologie
    Burkhard Jakob, GSI/FAIR
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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles
news-5202 Wed, 15 Dec 2021 09:00:00 +0100 Giuliano Franchetti becomes Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5202&cHash=e989fc629abb9df2cdf73b9bc3e0434b Dr. Giuliano Franchetti has been elected "Fellow 2021" of the American Physical Society (APS). With this prestigious recognition, the APS honors Giuliano Franchetti's outstanding contributions in the field of accelerator and beam physics. The Italian physicist, who works in the GSI department storage rings (STR), receive the election as APS-Fellow for „broad, impactful advancements in the understanding of lattice resonances for the high intensity regime, and for exceptional leadership in the community.” Dr. Giuliano Franchetti has been elected "Fellow 2021" of the American Physical Society (APS). With this prestigious recognition, the APS honors Giuliano Franchetti's outstanding contributions in the field of accelerator and beam physics. The Italian physicist, who works in the GSI department storage rings (STR), receive the election as APS-Fellow for „broad, impactful advancements in the understanding of lattice resonances for the high intensity regime, and for exceptional leadership in the community.”

Giuliano Franchetti studied physics at the University of Padua in Italy. He conducted his PhD research at GSI in the accelerator physics department and received his doctorate from the University of Bologna in 1998, where he studied the physics of high-intensity ion beams from a theoretical point of view. Since 2000 he has been a scientist at GSI in various positions, currently he is actively involved in the beam physics of storage rings. In addition to his work at GSI, he gained broad experience with visits at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the European research center CERN, and the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics in Moscow/FAIR-Russia Research Center, among others. Dr. Franchetti is co-coordinator of the task "Pushing Accelerator Frontier" (WP5.2, iFAST) of the EU Network "Innovation Fostering in Accelerator Science and Technology”. He has been teaching at the Institute of Applied Physics at Goethe University Frankfurt since 2010 and since 2020 is a member of the Helmholtz Forschungsakademie Hessen für FAIR (HFHF).

"Being named an APS Fellow is a very special honor for me. I am very pleased and thankful for the great recognition from my colleagues worldwide," Giuliano Franchetti said on his appointment. "With my work, I will continue to contribute to current and future research at GSI and FAIR and to add new knowledge, especially in the field of storage rings. The combination of existing research structures and future FAIR storage rings creates an extraordinary research potential."

The APS is one of the world's most important and prestigious physics societies. Founded in 1899, the professional organization for physicists today has more than 55,000 members worldwide, from academia, national laboratories and industry. The APS is divided into numerous specialist groups covering all areas of physical research. APS members attain the status of a Fellow on the basis of a precisely defined nomination and evaluation process. Each year, the APS elects no more than one-half of one percent of the society’s membership as Fellows. This year, two APS Fellowships went to GSI/FAIR. In addition to Giuliano Franchetti’s fellowship, Professor Yury Litvinov from the Research Department Atomic Physics also received this prestigious award, once again confirming the exceptional quality of our human capital. (BP)

Further information

Website of APS

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5200 Mon, 13 Dec 2021 09:00:00 +0100 “FAIR Days Poland” hosted by Jagiellonian University Krakow https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5200&cHash=92981a50f57af2fdc2dd2adbc896b664 Two “FAIR Days”, recently hosted by Jagiellonian University (JU) Krakow, aimed to boost the Polish participation in FAIR. It was a very successful event with a number of important meetings, including such with the Vice Rector Research of the Jagiellonian University, with the Polish Academy of Sciences, with a very large and qualified delegation of Polish industries, with authorities and with the representatives of the different universities which are participating in FAIR. A colloquium and the signature of Two “FAIR Days”, recently hosted by Jagiellonian University (JU) Krakow, aimed to boost the Polish participation in FAIR. It was a very successful event with a number of important meetings, including such with the Vice Rector Research of the Jagiellonian University, with the Polish Academy of Sciences, with a very large and qualified delegation of Polish industries, with authorities and with the representatives of the different universities which are participating in FAIR. A colloquium and the signature of cooperation agreements were also part of the program.

Visit IFJ PAN Krakow and Cyclotron Centre Bronowice

The FAIR/GSI delegation with Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director, Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director, and GET_INvolved Programme coordinator Dr. Pradeep Ghosh visited the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Krakow, where they met with Director Professor Tadeusz Lesiak and several department heads to learn about the institute's research activities. The meeting was very insightful for the Management as the skillset and experience of the researchers and engineers are considered as a powerful resource when comes to the commissioning and the installation of the FAIR components. There was also an opportunity to visit the Cyclotron Centre Bronowice (in Polish - Centrum Cyklotronowe Bronowice, CCB), where the cyclotron facility serves as a perfect example of the application of fundamental science in tumor radiotherapy.

Signing Ceremony at Jagiellonian University Krakow

FAIR/GSI and Jagiellonian University authorities signed a cooperation document (“memorandum of understanding”) and an agreement on student and staff mobility within the framework of the GET_INvolved Program. At the event at the Collegium Maius in Krakow, Poland's oldest University in Poland was represented by Professor Piotr Kutrowski, Vice-Rector for Research at JU. The FAIR/GSI delegation included Professor Paolo Giubellino, Jörg Blaurock, and Dr. Pradeep Ghosh.

As a result of the new collaboration agreement, students and workers of the Jagiellonian University will be able to take benefit from the extensive research capabilities of the future FAIR accelerator center. Young researchers, in particular, will benefit from specialized internships for bachelor's and master's degree programs as well as joint research for PhD programs.

The signing of the agreement, which was also attended by several representatives from Jagiellonian University and the JU Faculty of Physics, Astronomy, and Applied Computer Science, was followed by a discussion on the role of Jagiellonian University in FAIR, which included Professor Piotr Salabura, Professor Zbigniew Majka, and Alicja Nowakowska, in addition to the FAIR/GSI delegation and Professor Kustrowski.

Meeting with representatives of industry and AGH ASIC development centers

An instructive session was organized at Jagiellonian University for representatives from several Polish firms that are either making high-tech products or are interested in participating in the mega-science project. The representatives of the industry had the opportunity to explain the significant qualities of their products and for the FAIR project. The firms Prevac, KrioSystem, Kordecki Automation and S2innovation offered themselves to the management during this event. Solaris - National Center for Synchrotron Radiation and AGH University of Science and Technology officials also spoke about their achieved results. Ms. Nowicka, the liaison officer for the Polish shareholders explained how industry representatives may have access to information about forthcoming bids and how they can actively search for interdisciplinary projects at FAIR.

Launch of FAIR Seminars at JU

The second day of the visit of the FAIR Delegation began providing an inaugural seminar about FAIR, which was a webcast live for all Jagiellonian University students and researchers. FAIR Seminars is a new initiative of the Jagiellonian University and the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN to organize a series of monthly seminars on the FAIR project. This initiative aims to disseminate among Polish scientists, engineers and students the knowledge about the project of the FAIR accelerator center being built at Darmstadt, which will be one of the largest centers of this type in the world. The seminars will discuss the main research pillars of FAIR (NUSTAR, CBM, PANDA, APPA), the status of the project, and above all - the participation of Polish research groups in this project. This public session was the starting point of a series of FAIR seminars at Jagiellonian University.

Meeting with National Consortium FEMTOPHYSICS

The FAIR Management met with nominated representatives from the National Consortium FEMTOPHYSICS (NCF) (in Polish Krajowe Konsorcjum FEMTOFIZYKA), which is made up of 12 Polish institutions that collaborate on the FAIR experiments. The delegates got a unique opportunity to speak with the FAIR/GSI Management about their concerns and questions, as well as discuss important problems related to FAIR Experiments. This discussion was crucial in terms of scheduling the following steps for the FAIR Phase 0 experiments in 2022, as well as the Project's transition from construction to Day 1 experiments. 

The “FAIR Days Poland” hosted by the Jagiellonian University were very fruitful as all aspects of the FAIR Project were covered. Moreover, the signed agreements will enable scientists from the Jagiellonian University to significantly broaden the use of the research possibilities of the FAIR center. The prepared contract is particularly oriented towards young scientists by launching a dedicated system of apprenticeships, research internships and jointly conducted masters and doctoral dissertations. (BP)

About Jagiellonian University

The Jagiellonian University (JU) was founded on 12 May 1364 by the Polish king Casimir the Great. It is the oldest higher education institution in Poland and one of the oldest in Europe. Jagiellonian University was nominated by the Minister of Science and Higher Education for international shareholder in FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe) GmbH. The Jagiellonian University has been coordinating and managing Polish participation in the FAIR program since 2010. The Jagiellonian University – Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science – is working on several large projects related to the design of FAIR’s scientific equipment.

About National Consortium FEMTOPHYSICS

The National Consortium of FEMTOPHYSICS was established to prepare a structure focusing on experimental research activities at FAIR. The area of substantive activities of the National Consortium FEMTOPHYSICS is research in the field of physics and its applications. The national consortium includes the following prestigious institutes (in alphabetical order): the AGH University of Science and Technology, the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, the National Centre of Nuclear Research, the Cracow University of Technology, the Warsaw University of Technology, the Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, the Gdańsk University of Technology, the Jagiellonian University in Kraków (coordinating entity), Jan Kochanowski University of Kielce, the University of Lodz, the University of Silesia in Katowice and the University of Warsaw.

About GET_INvolved Programme

The GET_INvolved Programme provides international students and early-stage researchers from partner institutions with opportunities to perform internships, traineeships and early-stage research experience to get involved in the international FAIR accelerator project while receiving scientific and technical training. For more information on the GET_INvolved Programme, interested persons can contact the respective coordinators: Dr. Pradeep Ghosh (GSI and FAIR, Pradeep.Ghosh@fair-center.eu) and Professor Piotr Salabura (Jagiellonian University, Piotr.Salabura@uj.edu.pl).

Weiterführende Links

FAIR and Polish participation

Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland

IFJ PAN, Krakow, Poland

Centrum Cyklotronowe Bronowice, CCB

GET_INvolved Programme

FAIR seminars at JU

National Consortium FEMTOPHYSICS

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5205 Thu, 09 Dec 2021 13:00:00 +0100 Beginning of a new scientific era: Professor Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo receives Leibniz Prize https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5205&cHash=f262c0c5997ed0cf30000569ce98b314 Professor Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo will receive the 2022 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation). This is most important and highest endowed German research prize. Martínez-Pinedo is award for his outstanding work at the interface between astrophysics, nuclear physics and neutrino physics. He researches and teaches at the Institute for Nuclear Physics at the TU Darmstadt and at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. This press release is based on an press release of TU Darmstadt

Professor Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo will receive the 2022 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation). This is most important and highest endowed German research prize. Martínez-Pinedo is award for his outstanding work at the interface between astrophysics, nuclear physics and neutrino physics. He researches and teaches at the Institute for Nuclear Physics at the TU Darmstadt and at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt.

Physicist Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo's work has helped to solve one of the biggest unsolved problems in physics in the 21st century: Where does nature produce heavy elements, such as the noble metals gold or platinum? Together with other scientists including Professor Almudena Arcones from Darmstadt, Martínez-Pinedo showed that these elements are created during the merger of neutron stars and that this process produces a distinct electromagnetic signal, a light curve, for which Martínez-Pinedo and colleagues created the term "kilonova." In 2017, such a kilonova was observed for the first time, simultaneously by the "messengers" of light and gravitational waves.

This scientific milestone, in which Martínez-Pinedo was involved in a leading role, is considered to be the birth of multi-messenger astronomy, which opens up completely new scientific possibilities. In the future, for example, the nuclear physics processes involved in the merger of neutron stars  will be studied with unprecedented quality in the laboratory after completion of the  international accelerator center FAIR currently being built at GSI in Darmstadt. This opens up the opportunity to unravel the dynamics involved in the merger of two neutron stars from details of the gravitational wave and light curve signals and to address fundamental questions - such as how the transition of the merging neutron stars to a black hole proceeds, whether a new form of matter, "quark matter," is passed through during the merger, or whether merging neutron stars are the only place where heavy elements can be created in the astrophysical r-process. Most of the nuclei involved in the r-process are extremely short-lived, so their properties must be modeled theoretically in order to explore the r-process. In this, Martínez-Pinedo has taken a world-leading role in recent years.

Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo combines the expertise in the research fields of astrophysics, nuclear physics, and neutrino physics, which positions him to be a world leader in a highly interdisciplinary research field.

Another highlight of Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo's scientific career was the discovery of the neutrino-p-process, a nucleosynthesis process occurring during a supernova. More recently, the physicist has been working on the description of the interaction of neutrinos with matter in supernovae. At TU Darmstadt and GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo heads the Theoretical Nuclear Astrophysics groups. With his work at both research institutions, he has contributed significantly in establishing Darmstadt as a center of nuclear astrophysics worldwide.

The Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize has been awarded annually by the DFG since 1986 to scientists working in Germany in a wide range of disciplines. Up to ten prizes can be awarded each year, each with a prize money of 2.5 million euros. The prize money is intended, among other things, to expand the research opportunities of the award recipients. The Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) today awarded the 2022 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize to ten scientists. They had previously been selected from 134 proposals. The prize money is intended, among other things, to expand the research opportunities of the award recipients; the award winners can use it for their research work for up to seven years according to their own ideas and without bureaucratic effort.

Professor Paolo Giubellino, the Scientific Managing Director of FAIR and GSI, says, “I am extremely delighted about this decision of the German Research Foundation and the great appreciation of the excellent scientific work of Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo. At the same time, the award is a proof of the outstanding opportunities in the research area of Darmstadt, at GSI and FAIR as well as at TUD. With FAIR, we will be able to further extend the perspectives of such groundbreaking research as conducted by Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo and enable further important pioneering achievements. Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo is one of the key players in the research community as a world-renowned expert on the formation of chemical elements in the universe."

"We congratulate the laureate Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo on this outstanding award," says Professor Tanja Brühl, President of TU Darmstadt. "He has initiated a paradigm shift in the study of the formation of heavy elements. Research personalities like him strengthen the role of the Technische Universität Darmstadt and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, which together have become an internationally outstanding center of nuclear astrophysics. We are proud that with Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo another Leibniz prizewinner is helping to shape the research field of Matter and Materials at TU Darmstadt. With his expertise, he also strengthens the excellence cluster initiative ELEMENTS, funded by the HMWK, which we are developing together with Goethe University."

About Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo

Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo studied at the Autonomous University of Madrid, where he received his PhD in Theoretical Physics. His further career took him to the California Institute of Technology, the universities of Aarhus, Basel and Barcelona, among others. Since 2005, he has worked at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, where he heads now the Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure Theory Department and in 2020 became one of the directors of the Helmholtz Research Academy of Hesse for FAIR. Since 2011, Martínez-Pinedo has held the professorship of Theoretical Nuclear Astrophysics in the Department of Physics at TU Darmstadt. Martínez-Pinedo has received many awards; among others, he received an ERC Advanced Grant last year for the project "Probing r-process nucleosynthesis through electromagnetic signatures (KILONOVA)". He is a much sought-after speaker at international conferences, represents his field in important international committees, and publishes in prestigious scientific journals. (TUD/BP)

Further information

Release of TU Darmstadt

Release of DFG

 

 

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5191 Mon, 06 Dec 2021 08:06:00 +0100 Color centers in diamonds serve as gyroscopes https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5191&cHash=95074cb39a9fc2c3597947912997215c When we turn our head, our brain realizes this rotation primarily through the visual impression — that is, through what we see. Technical devices, on the other hand, rely on gyroscopes, i.e. rotation sensors. Among other things, these are important for navigation. In an airplane's autopilot, for example, a gyroscope detects the three different types of rotation that the plane can perform: It can roll, i.e. turn one wing down and the other up, pull the nose up or down (pitch), or turn relative to the ... This news is based on a press release by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

When we turn our head, our brain realizes this rotation primarily through the visual impression — that is, through what we see. Technical devices, on the other hand, rely on gyroscopes, i.e. rotation sensors. Among other things, these are important for navigation. In an airplane's autopilot, for example, a gyroscope detects the three different types of rotation that the plane can perform: It can roll, i.e. turn one wing down and the other up, pull the nose up or down (pitch), or turn relative to the ground (yaw). Gyroscopes are also important in vehicles on the ground, such as autonomous cars.

The research group led by Prof. Dr. Dmitry Budker published their idea of using color centers in diamonds as gyroscopes already back in 2012. Now the researchers have been able to provide practical proof. They recently published their results in the journal Science Advances.

Color centers in diamond already used to measure magnetic fields

“We and other groups have already used these color centers to measure magnetic fields for several years,” explains Budker, a physicist at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), which, in addition to the university, is also funded by the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. “In principle, the measurement of rotations works as with a magnetometer, but some challenges arise.” For example, the sensor must ignore fluctuating magnetic fields in order to measure rotations. Budker and his team were able to address this problem, however. On the one hand, they use nuclear spins instead of electron spins for gyroscopy, which have a much smaller magnetic moment and therefore lower sensitivity to magnetic fields. On the other hand, the scientists were able to shield external magnetic fields to a large extent and still maintain a very stable bias magnetic field internally to generate the measurement effect, which also hardly reacts to temperature fluctuations. Should fluctuating magnetic fields occur in the external space, the color centers do not “see” them. Dr. Peter Blümler from JGU addressed the questions and challenges surrounding this magnetic field. However, the experiments and the first proof were achieved by Dr. Andrey Jarmola and Budker's former PhD student, Dr. Sean Lourette, at the University of California at Berkeley.

Thus, the researchers report two innovations in their paper. First, they were able to realize their 2012 idea and use diamond color centers as gyroscopes. Second, they worked out a technical way to make it happen. However, there are still more challenges to overcome before the method is feasible in everyday applications. (JGU/CP)

Further information
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Aktuelles
news-5193 Thu, 02 Dec 2021 09:00:00 +0100 Christoph Schmelzer Prize awarded to two young researchers https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5193&cHash=0115419909cca4601e5c6c002e45022f Two young researchers have been awarded this year's Christoph Schmelzer Prize: Dr. Theresa Suckert from the Technical University of Dresden and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), partner site Dresden, and Dr. Felix Horst from the University of Giessen. With this award, the Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy with Heavy Ions e.V. annually honors outstanding master's respectively doctoral theses in the field of tumor therapy with ion beams. Two young researchers have been awarded this year's Christoph Schmelzer Prize: Dr. Theresa Suckert from the Technical University of Dresden and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), partner site Dresden, and Dr. Felix Horst from the University of Giessen. With this award, the Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy with Heavy Ions e.V. annually honors outstanding master's respectively doctoral theses in the field of tumor therapy with ion beams.

Unfortunately, due to the current pandemic situation the award ceremony that was planned for November 25 at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt had again to be cancelled, as already in 2020. However, a special seminar will be held beginning of 2022 were the awardees will be given an opportunity to present their work to the interested community. Also the two 2020 award winners, Dr. Alina Bendinger from the German Cancer Research Center DKFZ Heidelberg and Dr. Giorgia Meschini from the State Polytechnic University in Milan (Politecnico di Milano) will contribute to this seminar.

In her PhD thesis entitled „Normal brain tissue reaction after proton irradiation“ Theresa Suckert has investigated the damaging effects on the normal tissue in the brain after proton irradiation, a highly relevant topic for clinical applications of proton beams. She has analyzed the potential of tissue slice cultures as surrogate for in-vivo experiments, and she has gained important insights into the applicability of this approach to investigate radiation induced tumor and normal tissue response. Furthermore, based on a mouse model she has performed challenging experiments, aiming at the high precision irradiation of small, clinically relevant subvolumes of the mouse brain. Therefore, she has developed and implemented the complete, very complex workflow including imaging, treatment planning, positioning verification, dosimetry as well as tissue excision and preparation. This approach represents an essential basis for upcoming preclinical experiments aiming at the further elucidation of ion specific radiation response mechanisms.

Dr. Felix Horst has performed experiments to determine nuclear reaction cross sections of light ions in the therapeutically relevant energy range; his PhD thesis is entitled „Measurement of Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Applications in Radiotherapy with Protons, Helium and Carbon Ions”. He has performed these experiments at the medical ion beam centers at Marburg (MIT) and Heidelberg (HIT). His results allowed the optimization of nuclear reaction models and with that substantially improving the therapeutic dose calculations. The direct implementation of these improved models in treatment planning for patients treated with Helium ions at HIT highlights the particular clinical relevance. An additional part of the PhD thesis aimed at improved measurements of reaction cross sections of radiation induced positron emitters, which are relevant for an increased accuracy of range verification measurements based on the PET method. The PET method allows precise monitoring of patient irradiation with ion beams.

The prize money for the dissertations is 1500 Euro each. The award is named after Professor Christoph Schmelzer, co-founder and first Scientific Managing Director of GSI. The promotion of young scientists in the field of tumor therapy with ion beams has meanwhile been continuing for many years, and the award was presented for the 23rd time. The topics of the award-winning theses are of fundamental importance for the further development of ion beam therapy and often find their way into clinical application. (BP)

About the Association

The Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy supports research activities in the field of tumor therapy with heavy ions with the aim of improving the treatment of tumors and making it available to general patient care. At the accelerator facility at GSI, more than 400 patients with tumors in the head and neck area were treated with ion beams as part of a pilot project from 1997 to 2008. The cure rates of this method are sometimes over 90 percent and the side effects are very low. The success of the pilot project led to the establishment of clinical ion beam therapy centers in Heidelberg and Marburg, where patients are now regularly treated with heavy ions.

Further information

Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy with Heavy Ions e.V.

German Cancer Consortium

Technical University of Dresden

Justus Liebig University of Giessen

 

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5195 Mon, 29 Nov 2021 18:36:46 +0100 Precision mass measurements of indium isotopes allow conclusions on the mass of the doubly-magic atomic nucleus of tin-100 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5195&cHash=d326bd52bf15461efeb8cde717996f3b Physicists call the atomic nucleus of tin-100 doubly magic because it simultaneously has two shell closures. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to measure its mass. An international group of scientists at the European research centre CERN (Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire) including physicists from GSI Helmholtzzentrum and University of. Greifswald has now succeeded in measuring the precise masses of the indium isotopes 99In, 100In and 101In, thus making it possible to draw conclusions for ... This news is based on a press release of the University of Greifswald

Physicists call the atomic nucleus of tin-100 doubly magic because it simultaneously has two shell closures. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to measure its mass. An international group of scientists at the European research centre CERN (Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire) including physicists from GSI Helmholtzzentrum and University of. Greifswald has now succeeded in measuring the precise masses of the indium isotopes 99In, 100In and 101In, thus making it possible to draw conclusions for the mass value of tin-100. 

Similar to electrons in atomic shells, the building blocks of the atomic nuclei, protons and neutrons, quantum mechanically group together in nuclear shells. Full shells correspond to particularly high binding energies and stabilities. Thus, the shell closure numbers 8, 20, 28, 50, 82 and 126 are called “magic” numbers. The doubly-magic nuclei are particularly interesting. For these nuclei, both the proton number Z and the neutron number N indicate shell closures. And, among those doubly-magic nuclei, the nucleus of the tin isotope 100Sn is the most prominent: It is the heaviest nucleus for isotopes that have the same Z and N values, Z = N = 50. But so far, a direct experimental determination of its mass is extremely challenging. This is due to the difficulties in the production of 100Sn as well as in its short half-life of just about a second.

Directly adjacent to the doubly-magic 100Sn, we find the nuclei of the element indium, which have one proton less than the tin nuclei. It was now possible to perform precision mass measurements of the indium isotopes 99In, 100In and 101In with the ISOLTRAP setup at CERN. This was the first direct mass measurement for indium-99; the accuracy of the indium-100 and indium-101 mass values have been improved significantly. Ivan Kulikov, a PhD student at GSI and FAIR, was involved in the experiments and was assigned to CERN for four years.

The new results, published in Nature Physics, confirm values measured at GSI in cooperation with scientists from the Technical University of Munich. “Beta decay of 100Sn has been studied 13 years ago within the RISING gamma-spectroscopy project behind the FRS of GSI and then more recently and with a higher statistics at RIKEN in Japan within EURICA campaign. The observed discrepancy between those two results causes intense discussions in the community,” says Dr. Magdalena Gorska, the co-author of both measurements.
Yuri Litvinov, the principal investigator of the ERC project "ASTRUm", within which the researchers from GSI Atomic Physics division contributed to this experiment, explains:
 “By using the new mass value of 100In and with help of theoretical calculations performed by the group of Prof. Achim Schwenk at the TU Darmstadt, it became possible to draw a clear conclusion on the mass of 100Sn, favoring an older GSI measurement of C. Hinke et al. published in Nature.” 

Among other funding sources, this research was supported by the European Research Council (ERC) through the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement 682841 ‘ASTRUm’).

New possibilities to answer challenging questions in nuclear structure and reactions will be opened up with FAIR. The international accelerator facility, one of the largest research projects worldwide, is currently under construction at GSI. This research at FAIR is pursued by the NUSTAR Collaboration, which builds dedicated state-of-the-art experiments at the future in-flight fragment separator Super-FRS. (LW/Universität Greifswald)

Further information

Original paper: M Mougeot et al. (2021): Mass measurements of 99-101In challenge ab initio nuclear theory of the nuclide 100Sn, Nature Physics.
Press release of University of Greifswald

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FAIR News (ENG) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5189 Sat, 27 Nov 2021 09:34:00 +0100 Thirst for knowledge on Saturday morning — GSI/FAIR at virtual event "Saturday Morning Physics" for high-school students https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5189&cHash=c7d864502a6da0b58bdde42ad0dff96a Approximately 170 high-school students learned about GSI and FAIR this year in the lecture series “Saturday Morning Physics”. The series, organized by the Technical University of Darmstadt, takes place as an online-only event due to the Corona pandemic, as it already did last year. On four Saturdays, the participants quench their thirst for knowledge about current research in physics —last Saturday, a virtual visit to the accelerators and experiments of GSI and FAIR was part of the program. Approximately 170 high-school students learned about GSI and FAIR this year in the lecture series “Saturday Morning Physics”. The series, organized by the Technical University of Darmstadt, takes place as an online-only event due to the Corona pandemic, as it already did last year. On four Saturdays, the participants quench their thirst for knowledge about current research in physics —last Saturday, a virtual visit to the accelerators and experiments of GSI and FAIR was part of the program.

Through an introductory lecture and short video clips, the students had the opportunity to learn about GSI's facilities and research and the construction of components and buildings for the future international research center FAIR. The guided video tour took them to the linear accelerator UNILAC, the main control room and the heavy ion synchrotron SIS18. They learned how to produce new elements at the SHIP experiment, how to treat tumors with carbon ions, and how the large experiment HADES can be used to unravel the mystery of mass. The program also included a virtual visit to the test facility for superconducting FAIR magnets and to the viewpoint of the FAIR construction site. A drone flight over the construction field rounded off the event. Afterwards they had the opportunity to ask questions via a live chat, which was actively used by the participants.

The "Saturday Morning Physics" event series is organized by the Physics Faculty of the TU Darmstadt. It takes place annually and aims to encourage young people's interest in physics. In the events, students learn more about physics research at the university. Those who participate in all events receive the “Saturday-Morning-Physics” diploma. GSI and later FAIR have been among the sponsors and supporters of the series since its beginning. (CP)

Weitere Informationen:
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FAIR News (ENG) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5187 Fri, 26 Nov 2021 09:00:00 +0100 PANDA Collaboration honors PhD: Prize for Dr. Oliver Noll https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5187&cHash=09b870741698474a5778e59c5576e2c4 Dr. Oliver Noll has received the PANDA PhD Prize 2021 for his doctoral thesis "Digital Signal Processing for the Measurement of Particle Properties with the PANDA Electromagnetic Calorimeter" at GSI, FAIR and Mainz University. His doctoral advisor was Prof. Dr. Frank Maas from Mainz University. The award was announced by the spokesman of the PANDA Collaboration, Ulrich Wiedner from the Ruhr-University Bochum, at the most recent Online PANDA Collaboration meeting. Dr. Oliver Noll has received the PANDA PhD Prize 2021 for his doctoral thesis "Digital Signal Processing for the Measurement of Particle Properties with the PANDA Electromagnetic Calorimeter" at GSI, FAIR and Mainz University. His doctoral advisor was Prof. Dr. Frank Maas from Mainz University. The award was announced by the spokesman of the PANDA Collaboration, Ulrich Wiedner from the Ruhr-University Bochum, at the most recent Online PANDA Collaboration meeting.

In his dissertation, Physicist Oliver Noll worked on the development of the PANDA electromagnetic calorimeter, which is one of the main subsystems of the PANDA experiment. Prior to Oliver Noll’s work no specific algorithm for the digital processing of the APFEL readout chip signals existed. In the thesis work, a detailed study of the APFEL pulse shape and noise components was performed. Within the PhD work also were carried out major contributions to the development, construction and operation of EMC prototypes, which were used in beam tests for proving the functionality of the PANDA EMC design and optimizing its performance.

The PANDA Collaboration has awarded the PhD Prize once per year since 2013 in order to honor the best dissertation written in connection with the PANDA experiment. Candidates for the PhD Prize are nominated by their doctoral advisors. In addition to being directly related to the PANDA experiment, the nominees’ doctoral degrees must have received a rating of “very good” or better. Up to three candidates are shortlisted for the award and can present their dissertations at the PANDA Collaboration meeting. The winner is chosen by a committee that is appointed for this task by the PANDA Collaboration. The PANDA Collaboration awards the PhD Prize to specifically honor students’ contributions to the PANDA project. (BP)

Further Information

About the doctoral thesis of Dr. Oliver Noll

About the PANDA prize

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5177 Wed, 24 Nov 2021 08:38:00 +0100 Successful restart of the ALICE detector — Stable beam following extensive upgrades https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5177&cHash=414b8f2da0a1a8281d25d34ee4933705 Extensive upgrades have been made over the past two years to the ALICE experiment at the European Research Center CERN in Geneva. GSI plays a major role in the construction and operation of the giant detector which now returned to operation and delivered first data in test collisions. Extensive upgrades have been made over the past two years to the ALICE experiment at the European Research Center CERN in Geneva. GSI plays a major role in the construction and operation of the giant detector which now returned to operation and delivered first data in test collisions.

During the so-called second long shutdown (LS2), the CERN accelerator LHC (Large Hadron Collider) underwent extensive upgrades and can now collide lead nuclei at rates of up to 50 kilohertz in the ALICE detector. To fully exploit this potential, the measurement setup also had to be improved. For this purpose, the Time Projection Chamber TPC could be renewed and reinstalled at the ALICE detector. A new Muon Forward Tracker was also installed. In May, the largest pixel detector ever built — the Inner Tracking System ITS — took the seat of its predecessor between the beam pipe and the TPC. The final piece of the puzzle, the Fast Interaction Trigger FIT, was installed in July.

The TPC in particular represents a real innovation: The previous TPC readout chambers could process a maximum of three kilohertz. The new chambers use so-called GEM technology (Gas Electron Multiplier) and can read out data continuously — in contrast to the previous technology, which was based on multi-wire proportional chambers. The changed method is the only option to process the LHC's new high collision rates. As a consequence, this also required new software systems for data acquisition, calibration, reconstruction and analysis.

GSI has been involved in the development of new measurement instruments, in particular in the design and construction of the ALICE TPC, and in the ALICE scientific program from the very beginning. Also this time, GSI contributed significantly to the development of the new readout chambers. A substantial part of the chambers was built in collaboration between the ALICE research department and the detector laboratory at GSI. Staff from both GSI departments also assisted in the insertion of the chambers on site at CERN. Likewise, GSI’s IT department made key contributions to the new software systems. The GSI computer center remains an integral part of the computer network for data analysis of the ALICE experiment. The expertise from the upgrades is also relevant for the future operation of FAIR. For example, continuous data streams will also be read out at the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment.

The work on ALICE was part of a Helmholtz-wide initiative, including, next to GSI, also the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY): a large investment fund of the Helmholtz Association was devoted to upgrades of ALICE as well as the two other experiments ATLAS and CMS for the “Full Exploitation of the Large Hadron Collider”.

ALICE is one of the four large experiments at CERN's LHC collider and in particular investigates heavy ion collisions of lead atom nuclei. When the nuclei collide with unimaginable energy, conditions like those prevailing in the first moments of the universe are created. During the collisions, a so-called quark-gluon plasma is formed for a very short time — a state of matter that existed in the universe shortly after the Big Bang. This plasma transforms back into normal matter within fractions of a second. The particles produced in the process provide information about the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. Thus, the measurements can look into the birth of the cosmos and reveal information about the basic building blocks of matter and their interactions. (CP)

Further information:

 

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FAIR News (ENG) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5175 Mon, 22 Nov 2021 09:00:00 +0100 Special GSI expertise: Review text discusses current status and challenges of heavy ion therapy https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5175&cHash=3626858e4430c862cf2ad42de9dd5607 Which are the best applications for tumor therapy with charged particles to realize its great potential for the future? In which cases can it be used most effectively? These aspects belong to the most exciting questions in radiation biology and medical physics. A group of top-class experts now evaluated and summarized the state-of-the-art of heavy ion radiotherapy and presented a review article in the world-renowned online journal "Nature Reviews". Main author of the text with the title „Physics and biomed Which are the best applications for tumor therapy with charged particles to realize its great potential for the future? In which cases can it be used most effectively? These aspects belong to the most exciting questions in radiation biology and medical physics. A group of top-class experts now evaluated and summarized the state-of-the-art of heavy ion radiotherapy and presented a review article in the world-renowned online journal "Nature Reviews". Main author of the text with the title „Physics and biomedical challenges of cancer therapy with accelerated heavy ions“ is Professor Marco Durante, Head of the GSI Biophysics Research Department.

Rather than there being a single ‘silver bullet’, different particles and their combination can provide a breakthrough in radiotherapy treatments in specific cases. This is one of the key messages of the review, which Professor Durante published together with the radiation oncologists Professor Jürgen Debus, Scientific Medical Director of the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) and Medical Director of the Clinic for Radio Oncology and Radiotherapy at the University of Heidelberg, and Professor Jay Stephen Loeffler, chair of Radiation Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

The GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung had pioneered new approaches to radiation therapy at an early stage and was the first in Europe to start heavy ion therapy. This treatment method can meet the requirements of modern radiation therapy particularly well: Radiotherapy should have low toxicity in the entrance channel, where normal tissue exists, and thus spare healthy tissue, and be very effective in cell killing in the target region, in the tumor itself. In this regard, ions heavier than protons have both physical and radiobiological advantages over conventional X- rays. This is also underlined by Professor Durante and his colleagues in their review of the present status quo: “Charged particle therapy is the most advanced radiotherapy technique. Most of the patients are treated with protons, but heavy ions present additional biological advantages.”

More than 20 years ago, the clinical studies of an innovative cancer treatment with accelerated carbon ions began at GSI in Darmstadt. This was preceded by joint studies with the Clinic of Radiology and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, and the Helmholtz research laboratory in Rossendorf. It was a starting point of a success story that has led from fundamental research to a widespread medical application. In the meantime, there are a dozen carbon ion clinical centres in Europe and Asia, where the therapy is ongoing. And more are under construction or at the planning stage, including the first in the USA. Clinical results are promising, whereas new ions will be used in the future, like 4He, the more frequent of the two stable isotopes of helium or the stable isotope of oxygen 16O.

The authors of the review article not only provide with great expertise an overview of the rapidly developing research field of particle therapy, but also present the entire wide-ranging spectrum from the physics and technology of heavy ions to radiobiology and the application of new ions and technologies. They also identify the key factors that will determine the future success of particle therapy: So a heated debate on the cost- effectiveness is ongoing in the clinical community, owing to the larger footprint and greater expense of heavy ion facilities compared with proton therapy centers. Heavy ion therapy is more expensive than X- ray therapy. On the other hand, radiobiology suggests that heavy ions for example can be exquisitely effective against hypoxic tumors, i.e. tumor tissue with a poor oxygen supply, and improve the effects of immunotherapy.

Thus, for the future of particle therapy further R&D in accelerators and beam delivery is necessary to make the machines smaller and cheaper and to exploit new, fascinating treatment modalities such as FLASH and radioactive ion beams for image-guided therapy.

Finally, Professor Durante and co-workers suggest that a combination of light and heavy ions can provide optimal biological effects, and underline the necessity of more pre-clinical research in these fields. “The potential of heavy ions has not been fully exploited in clinics.”

Current research at GSI and FAIR is also contributing an important part to the future of particle therapy, always with the goal of further increasing the therapeutic window in radiotherapy. For example, in the current experiment period FAIR Phase 0 GSI and FAIR succeeded in performing a carbon ion FLASH experiment for the first time. This work is about ultra-short and ultra-high radiation, where the treatment dose is delivered in sub-second timescales. The aim of FLASH irradiation is to apply even less damaging a high dose in a short time.

In addition, Professor Marco Durante's current BARB project, which is funded and acknowledged by an ERC Advanced Grant, aims at the use of the same beam for treatment and for imaging during treatment and thus increase precision. Radioactive ion beams are the ideal tool. Only cutting-edge facilities such as FAIR can generate such intense beams. (BP)

Further information

Publication "Physics and biomedical challenges of cancer therapy with accelerated heavy ions" in Nature Reviews Physics

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5165 Fri, 19 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0100 Yury Litvinov receives APS fellowship https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5165&cHash=694b1dfe2d0e4c1efde836939fcb1002 Professor Yury Litvinov has been elected to be a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). Litvinov is head of the Stored Particles Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC) Detectors group within the Atomic Physics research department at GSI/FAIR. Litvinov was chosen for “outstanding contributions to precision experiments employing heavy-ion storage rings for cross-discipline research in the realm of nuclear structure, atomic physics and astrophysics, and especially for seminal works on ... Professor Yury Litvinov has been elected to be a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). Litvinov is head of the Stored Particles Atomic Physics Research Collaboration (SPARC) Detectors group within the Atomic Physics research department at GSI/FAIR. Litvinov was chosen for “outstanding contributions to precision experiments employing heavy-ion storage rings for cross-discipline research in the realm of nuclear structure, atomic physics and astrophysics, and especially for seminal works on radioactive decays of highly-charged nuclides.”

Yury Litvinov studied physics in St. Petersburg and is a scientist at GSI since 1999. In 2009, he went to the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg for two years, where he completed his habilitation. Since 2011, Litvinov is actively involved in FAIR's APPA/SPARC research activities. Among other responsibilities, he is the coordinator of experiments at the Experimental Storage Ring ESR, and since 2012 he acts as the head of the group "SPARC Detectors" for FAIR, which is a part of the "Atomic Physics" department. Since 2016, Litvinov has been Principal Investigator for the EU-funded ERC Consolidator Grant "ASTRUm" and since 2017 he holds an adjunct professorship at the University of Heidelberg.

“It is a great honor and I am very excited to receive this important recognition,” Litvinov said on the occasion of his appointment. “I will continue to strive to expand knowledge of atomic, nuclear and astrophysics with help of the research facilities, storage rings and traps available now at GSI and in the future at FAIR, as well as worldwide, and to pass this knowledge on to young researchers as part of my teaching activities.”

APS is the major professional organization for physicists in the United States. It has over 55,000 members from academia, national laboratories, and industry. The mission of the APS is to advance and diffuse the knowledge of physics for the benefit of humanity, promote physics, and serve the broader physics community. Fellows are selected for their outstanding contributions to physics. Each year, the number of APS fellows elected is no more than one half of one percent of the membership. (CP)

Further information
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FAIR News (DEU) APPA News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5173 Wed, 17 Nov 2021 09:00:00 +0100 Wide range: Research papers from GSI/FAIR published in "Nature Reviews” https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5173&cHash=fbaae9841ed0e371c2b22f89f8fb1863 Two important research contributions from GSI and FAIR have been prominently published side by side in the world-renowned online journal "Nature Reviews". Both topics represent special GSI and FAIR research competence at the highest international level: The "Perspective" section deals with "New directions in hypernuclear physics", while the "Review Article" section focuses on "Physics and biomedical challenges of cancer therapy with accelerated heavy ions". Two important research contributions from GSI and FAIR have been prominently published side by side in the world-renowned online journal "Nature Reviews". Both topics represent special GSI and FAIR research competence at the highest international level: The "Perspective" section deals with "New directions in hypernuclear physics", while the "Review Article" section focuses on "Physics and biomedical challenges of cancer therapy with accelerated heavy ions".

"The closeness of the publication of the two contents exemplifies the extraordinarily broad thematic spectrum of cutting-edge research at GSI and FAIR, from basic research to applied research. I am very pleased about the outstanding and broad-based science on our research campus," says the Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino.

Medical research is the subject of the article by Professor Marco Durante, Head of the GSI Biophysics Department , which he published together with two renowned radiation oncologists: Professor Jürgen Debus, Scientific Medical Director of the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) and Medical Director of the Clinic for Radio Oncology and Radiotherapy at the University of  Heidelberg, and Professor Jay Stephen Loeffler, chair of Radiation Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston.

The article describes the state-of-the-art of heavy ion radiotherapy that GSI first started in Europe. Clinical results from Japan and Germany are promising, but R&D in accelerators and beam delivery is necessary to make the machines smaller and cheaper and to exploit new, fascinating treatment modalities such as FLASH and radioactive ion beams for image-guided therapy. Durante and co-workers suggest that, rather than a “silver bullet”, combination of light and heavy ions can provide optimal biological effects, and underline the necessity of more pre-clinical research in these fields.

The article by Professor Takehiko R. Saito, leading scientist in the GSI/FAIR research pillar NUSTAR, which he published as first author together with several research colleagues, is about basic research. From GSI/FAIR, Vasyl Drozd, Dr. Shizu Minami and Professor Christoph Scheidenberger were involved.

The researchers are directing the attention to hypernuclei; these are nuclei that, in addition to protons and neutrons, contain a further nuclear building block with a so-called strange quark. The investigations of such hypernuclei by means of energetic heavy ion collisions have revealed some surprises in the case of the light hypernuclei with only a few protons or neutrons and a Λ-hyperon - the latter containing the strange quark - e.g. the unexpected existence of a bound state of two neutrons with such a Λ-hyperon. “Solving these puzzles will not only impact our understanding of the fundamental baryonic interactions with strange quarks but also of the nature of the deep interior of neutron stars. We summarize ongoing projects and experiments at various facilities worldwide and outline future perspectives,” the authors explain. (BP)

Further information

Publication "Physics and biomedial challenges of cancer therapy with accelerated heavy ions" in Nature Reviews Physics

Publication "New directions in hypernuclear pysics" in Nature Reviews Physics

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5171 Mon, 15 Nov 2021 07:22:00 +0100 Where does gold come from? — New insights into element synthesis in the universe https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5171&cHash=84ee273a864085b7432b23502481db82 How are chemical elements produced in our Universe? Where do heavy elements like gold and uranium come from? Using computer simulations, a research team from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, together with colleagues from Belgium and Japan, shows that the synthesis of heavy elements is typical for certain black holes with orbiting matter accumulations, so-called accretion disks. The predicted abundance of the formed elements provides insight into which heavy elements ... How are chemical elements produced in our Universe? Where do heavy elements like gold and uranium come from? Using computer simulations, a research team from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, together with colleagues from Belgium and Japan, shows that the synthesis of heavy elements is typical for certain black holes with orbiting matter accumulations, so-called accretion disks. The predicted abundance of the formed elements provides insight into which heavy elements need to be studied in future laboratories — such as the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), which is currently under construction — to unravel the origin of heavy elements. The results are published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

All heavy elements on Earth today were formed under extreme conditions in astrophysical environments: inside stars, in stellar explosions, and during the collision of neutron stars. Researchers are intrigued with the question in which of these astrophysical events the appropriate conditions for the formation of the heaviest elements, such as gold or uranium, exist. The spectacular first observation of gravitational waves and electromagnetic radiation originating from a neutron star merger in 2017 suggested that many heavy elements can be produced and released in these cosmic collisions. However, the question remains open as to when and why the material is ejected and whether there may be other scenarios in which heavy elements can be produced.

Promising candidates for heavy element production are black holes orbited by an accretion disk of dense and hot matter. Such a system is formed both after the merger of two massive neutron stars and during a so-called collapsar, the collapse and subsequent explosion of a rotating star. The internal composition of such accretion disks has so far not been well understood, particularly with respect to the conditions under which an excess of neutrons forms. A high number of neutrons is a basic requirement for the synthesis of heavy elements, as it enables the rapid neutron-capture process or r-process. Nearly massless neutrinos play a key role in this process, as they enable conversion between protons and neutrons.

“In our study, we systematically investigated for the first time the conversion rates of neutrons and protons for a large number of disk configurations by means of elaborate computer simulations, and we found that the disks are very rich in neutrons as long as certain conditions are met,” explains Dr. Oliver Just from the Relativistic Astrophysics group of GSI's research division Theory. “The decisive factor is the total mass of the disk. The more massive the disk, the more often neutrons are formed from protons through capture of electrons under emission of neutrinos, and are available for the synthesis of heavy elements by means of the r-process. However, if the mass of the disk is too high, the inverse reaction plays an increased role so that more neutrinos are recaptured by neutrons before they leave the disk. These neutrons are then converted back to protons, which hinders the r-process.” As the study shows, the optimal disk mass for prolific production of heavy elements is about 0.01 to 0.1 solar masses. The result provides strong evidence that neutron star mergers producing accretion disks with these exact masses could be the point of origin for a large fraction of the heavy elements. However, whether and how frequently such accretion disks occur in collapsar systems is currently unclear.

In addition to the possible processes of mass ejection, the research group led by Dr. Andreas Bauswein is also investigating the light signals generated by the ejected matter, which will be used to infer the mass and composition of the ejected matter in future observations of colliding neutron stars. An important building block for correctly reading these light signals is accurate knowledge of the masses and other properties of the newly formed elements. “These data are currently insufficient. But with the next generation of accelerators, such as FAIR, it will be possible to measure them with unprecedented accuracy in the future. The well-coordinated interplay of theoretical models, experiments, and astronomical observations will enable us researchers in the coming years to test neutron star mergers as the origin of the r-process elements”, predicts Bauswein. (CP)

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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5169 Fri, 12 Nov 2021 09:00:00 +0100 Physics Nobel Laureate Giorgio Parisi makes significant research contributions also to research at GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5169&cHash=21c2f86154a5f14db5a41c9e564b652b This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded "for the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales." One half goes to Professor Giorgio Parisi "for the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales", the other half jointly to the climate researchers Professor Syukuro Manabe and Professor Klaus Hasselmann “for the physical modelling of Earth’s climate, quantifying variability and re This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded "for the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales." One half goes to Professor Giorgio Parisi "for the discovery of the interplay of disorder and fluctuations in physical systems from atomic to planetary scales", the other half jointly to the climate researchers Professor Syukuro Manabe and Professor Klaus Hasselmann “for the physical modelling of Earth’s climate, quantifying variability and reliably predicting global warming.” With his research, Giorgio Parisi also makes important contributions to research at GSI and FAIR, so to the CBM experiment and in particular to the PANDA experiment, two of the four major research pillars of the future international accelerator center FAIR.

The Management of GSI and FAIR congratulates warmly on the Nobel Prize: "We are very delighted for Giorgio Parisi, who, in addition to his Nobel Prize-winning contributions, has been recognized for outstanding science in the field of elementary particle physics, as it is also conducted on our campus at GSI and FAIR."

The Italian Giorgio Parisi has been working on the physics of elementary particles in addition to and in time before his now awarded work on "disorder and fluctuations in physical systems". Together with the Italian physicist Nicola Cabibbo, he made an important contribution to the understanding of the phase transition between quark-gluon plasma and hadronic matter and made fundamental discoveries on the structure of hadrons, in particular on "glueballs", in the framework of the APE collaboration (Array Processor Experiment at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN, in Italy). His pioneering paper with Italian physicist Guido Altarelli on "Asymptotic freedom in parton language" (Nucl.Phys.B 126 (1977) 298-318 ) is one of the most cited papers in all of nuclear and particle physics, with more than 7500 citations, and has laid the foundations for our understanding of the role of gluons in collisions between elementary particles and/or atomic nuclei at high energy. It has led to the "DGLAP" equations, which are central to the quantitative description of the vast majority of high-energy collisions.

Giorgio Parisi's scientific approaches will continue to have a lot of weight in research at the future FAIR accelerator center: The work with Cabibbo is an important milestone for the physics on the quark-gluon plasma and thus directly linked to the physics program of the CBM experiment. The work with the APE collaboration and in particular that with Altarelli, also forms the basis for research planned at the PANDA experiment.

Parisi also gave the opening lecture to the scientific program at the 2018 "Quark Matter Conference" in Venice, the most important international conference in this field, entitled "Some considerations on the quark-gluon plasma". The first part of the talk was on the Cabibbo-Parisi paper cited above and the question of thermalization in complex systems, which is still relevant today, thus preparing the ground for important discussions at the conference. The second part dealt with the structure of complex systems, the research area now awarded the Nobel Prize.

The Nobel Prize Committee's statement honoring Giorgio Parisi's achievement states: “Around 1980, Giorgio Parisi discovered hidden patterns in disordered complex materials. His discoveries are among the most important contributions to the theory of complex systems. They make it possible to understand and describe many different and apparently entirely random materials and phenomena, not only in physics but also in other, very different areas, such as mathematics, biology, neuroscience and machine learning.”

This range is also emphasized by the Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino: “The decision of the Nobel Prize Committee shows how closely apparently distant fields of research are related and how important the basic methodologies are for the complex description of very different scientific phenomena. They advance each other and cross-fertilize each other. Basic research is therefore quite crucial. I am extremely pleased about this exceptional appreciation for the scientific work of my colleague and friend."

A native of Rome, Parisi graduated in physics from La Sapienza University in Rome in 1970, where he has been a professor of quantum physics since 1992. He works in various subfields of physics, such as high-energy physics, quantum chromodynamics, phase transition theory, statistical mechanics, mathematical physics, biophysics and others. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5167 Wed, 10 Nov 2021 08:18:00 +0100 Now available: GSI and FAIR calendar for the year 2022 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5167&cHash=2ac644196287b870ad80afc53adc6492 The useful year planner has enjoyed great popularity for many years. It lists all public and school holidays. It offers a good overview of the year and is a useful planning aid for many people. The useful year planner has enjoyed great popularity for many years. It lists all public and school holidays. It offers a good overview of the year and is a useful planning aid for many people.

GSI and FAIR employees can get a copy at the foyer or at the reception in Borsigstraße. If you want to order the DIN-A2-sized calendar from FAIR and GSI, please contact  gsi-kalender(at)gsi.de  (Data Protection) directly via e-mail and receive the calendar by post. Please include the following information: your name, your address and the number of calendars you wish to order. We kindly ask for your understanding that because of the limited quantity a maximum of three calendars can be sent per request (while stocks last). (LW)

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5163 Mon, 08 Nov 2021 17:00:00 +0100 New insights into the structure of the neutron https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5163&cHash=f0126685e44e3a21f4e735f32476ea6f All known atomic nuclei and therefore almost all visible matter consist of protons and neutrons, yet many of the properties of these omnipresent natural building blocks remain unknown. As an uncharged particle, the neutron in particular resists many types of measurement and 90 years after its discovery there are still many unanswered questions regarding its size and lifetime, among other things. The neutron consists of three quarks which whirl around inside it, held together by gluons. Joint press release with the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

All known atomic nuclei and therefore almost all visible matter consist of protons and neutrons, yet many of the properties of these omnipresent natural building blocks remain unknown. As an uncharged particle, the neutron in particular resists many types of measurement and 90 years after its discovery there are still many unanswered questions regarding its size and lifetime, among other things. The neutron consists of three quarks which whirl around inside it, held together by gluons. Physicists use electromagnetic form factors to describe this dynamic inner structure of the neutron. These form factors represent an average distribution of electric charge and magnetization within the neutron and can be determined by means of experimentation.

Blank space on the form factor map filled with precise data

“A single form factor, measured at a certain energy level, does not say much at first,” explains Professor Frank Maas, a researcher at the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence in Mainz, the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt. “Measurements of the form factors at various energies are needed in order to draw conclusions on the structure of the neutron.” In certain energy ranges, which are accessible using standard electron-proton scattering experiments, form factors can be determined fairly accurately. However, so far this has not been the case with other ranges for which so-called annihilation techniques are needed that involve matter and antimatter mutually destroying each other.

In the BESIII experiment being undertaken in China, it has recently proved possible to precisely determine the corresponding data in the energy range 2 to 3.8 gigaelectronvolts; as pointed out in the article published in the current issue of Nature Physics by the partnership, this is over 60 times more accurate compared to previous measurements. “With this new data, we have, so to speak, filled a blank space on the neutron form factor ‘map’, which until now was unknown territory,” points out Frank Maas. “This data is now as precise as that obtained in corresponding scattering experiments. As a result, our knowledge of the form factors of the neutron will change dramatically, and as such we will get a far more comprehensive picture of this important building block of nature.”

Truly pioneering work in a difficult field of research

To make inroads into completing the required fields of the form factor ‘map’, the physicists needed antiparticles. The international partnership therefore used the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider II for its measurements. Here, electrons and their positive antiparticles, positrons, are allowed to collide in an accelerator and destroy each other, creating new, other particle pairs – a process known as ‘annihilation’ in physics. Using the BESIII detector, the researchers observed and analyzed the outcome, in which the electrons and positrons form neutrons and anti-neutrons. “Annihilation experiments like these are nowhere near as well-established as the standard scattering experiments,” adds Frank Maas. “Substantial development work was needed to carry out the current experiment – the intensity of the accelerator had to be improved and the detection method for the elusive neutron had to be practically reinvented in the analysis of the experimental data. This was by no means straightforward. Our partnership has done truly pioneering work here.”

Other interesting phenomena

As if this was not enough, the measurements showed the physicists that the results for the form factor do not produce a consistent slope relative to the energy level, but rather an oscillating pattern in which fluctuations become smaller as the energy level increases. They observed similar surprising behavior in the case of the proton - here however, the fluctuations were mirrored, i.e. phase-shifted. “This new finding indicates first and foremost that nucleons do not have a simple structure,” explains Frank Maas. “Now our colleagues on the theoretical side have been asked to develop models to account for this extraordinary behavior.”

Finally, on the basis of their measurements, the BESIII partnership has modified how the relative ratio of the neutron to proton form factors needs to be viewed. Many years ago, the result produced in the FENICE experiment was a ratio greater than one, which means that the neutron must have a consistently larger form factor than the proton. “But as the proton is charged, you would expect it to be completely the other way round,” asserts Frank Maas. “And that's just what we see when we compare our neutron data with the proton data we’ve recently acquired through BESIII. So here we’ve rectified how we need to perceive the very smallest particles.”

From the micro- to the macrocosm

According to Maas, the new findings are especially important because they are so fundamental.  “They provide new perspectives on the basic properties of the neutron. What’s more, by looking at the smallest building blocks of matter, we can also understand phenomena that occur in the largest dimensions – such as the fusion of two neutron stars. This physics of extremes is already very fascinating." (JGU/JL)

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Presse Aktuelles
news-5161 Thu, 04 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0100 A Passion for Precision https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5161&cHash=f75b45b43a5dff73c5912bbfc418364f The Otto Hahn Prize 2021 goes to nuclear physicist Professor Klaus Blaum of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The award is endowed with 50,000 euros and is jointly sponsored by the City of Frankfurt am Main, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the German Physical Society (DPG). The award ceremony took place on November 5 in the festive setting of Frankfurt's Paulskirche. Through his scientific work, but also through important committee activities, Klaus Blaum has been rela This text is based on a joint press release of the City of Frankfurt am Main, of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the German Physical Society e. V. (DPG)

The Otto Hahn Prize 2021 goes to nuclear physicist Professor Klaus Blaum of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The award is endowed with 50,000 euros and is jointly sponsored by the City of Frankfurt am Main, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the German Physical Society (DPG). The award ceremony took place on November 5 in the festive setting of Frankfurt's Paulskirche. Through his scientific work, but also through important committee activities, Klaus Blaum has been related to GSI and FAIR for a long time. For example, he was a member of the GSI Supervisory Board for many years and Vice Chair of the FAIR-GSI Joint Scientific Council.

"A passion for precision" concisely characterizes the research of physicist Klaus Blaum, who will be awarded the Otto Hahn Prize this year. His work is pioneering for broad areas of atomic, nuclear and particle physics, especially for the test of the fundamental forces of nature in the microcosm.

"The questions that Klaus Blaum addresses are only at first glance far away from the reality of our lives," said Mayor Peter Feldmann, describing the award winner's work. "He is, as a layman might say, the cartographer of the microcosm. With meticulousness and precision, he surveys what forces are at work there. Through him we understand the mechanisms of action of our environment. He proves that working on a small scale is not `small-small´ - but, on the contrary, virtually challenges our understanding of the world."

"With his research, Blaum is expanding our knowledge of the fundamental properties of the constituents of the matter that surrounds us," adds Lutz Schröter, president of the German Physical Society (DPG). Blaum's research activities are wide-ranging and can best be summarized as "the study of exotic particles and states." These include studies of highly charged ions, short-lived atomic nuclei, antimatter, and the heaviest artificial elements.

"With Klaus Blaum, an exceptional scientist is receiving the Otto Hahn Prize," says Peter R. Schreiner, president of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). "The findings of his work also create important foundations for chemical research."

Today, the properties of elementary particles and the forces acting between them are often studied at the highest energies. However, a number of fundamental questions in particle physics and cosmology can be pursued particularly well at low energies.

Since the effects here are usually extraordinarily tiny, the highest precision is required. To this end, Blaum and his group developed a large number of sophisticated techniques, often performing the experiments on single particles at the lowest temperatures. By applying a series of brilliant ideas and exceptional experimental skills, he combined sophisticated techniques from atomic, nuclear and accelerator physics.

Blaum published his scientific results in more than 450 scientific articles in the leading and most internationally recognized physics journals. Although considered young in scientific circles at 49, he is already one of the world's most productive and cited researchers in the field of precision physics and measurement.

Klaus Blaum was born in Bad Sobernheim, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, on December 27, 1971. He studied physics at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, where he received his doctorate in 2000 under Ernst-Wilhelm Otten (1934 - 2019) after receiving his diploma in 1997 and several research stays at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, USA. Subsequently, he was a research associate at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt until 2002 and worked at the European Nuclear Research Center CERN near Geneva. There he was project leader for "Mass spectrometry of exotic nuclei with ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE" until 2004. In October 2004, Blaum took over the position of project leader of the Helmholtz-University Young Investigators Group "Experiments with Stored and Cooled Ions" at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz for four years. In 2006, he habilitated there on high-precision mass spectrometry with Penning traps for charged particles and storage rings.

Blaum taught at the University of Mainz from 2004 to 2008. He was awarded the 2006 Teaching Prize of the State of Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, for his teaching activities. In October 2007, at the age of only 35, he received an appointment as director and scientific member of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. This was followed in April 2008 by his appointment as Honorary Professor (W3) of the Ruprecht Karls University in Heidelberg. Since July 2020, Blaum has been Vice President of the Max Planck Society, responsible for the institutes of the Chemical-Physical-Technical Section.

At a young age, Blaum was awarded numerous highly prestigious prizes, including the Gustav Hertz Prize of the German Physical Society in 2004 for his outstanding work on the mass determination of unstable atomic nuclei, as well as the Helmholtz Prize of the Physikalisch-Technischen Bundesanstalt (PTB) in 2012 and the Lise Meitner Prize of the European Physical Society (EPS) in 2020. In 2019, he was accepted as a foreign member of the physics class of the "Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences".

The Otto Hahn Prize is awarded jointly by the City of Frankfurt am Main, the German Physical Society (DPG) and the German Chemical Society (GDCh). It serves to promote science, particularly in the fields of chemistry, physics and applied engineering sciences, by recognizing outstanding scientific achievements. It is endowed with 50,000 euros and is awarded every two years with a ceremony in Frankfurt's Paulskirche. (DPG/GDCh/Stadt Frankfurt/BP)

Further Information

Stream from the awarding of the Otto Hahn Prize 2021 to Klaus Blaum (in German)

About Klaus Blaum

About the Otto Hahn Prize (in German)

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5159 Tue, 02 Nov 2021 10:00:00 +0100 Italian ambassador visits GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5159&cHash=f23e8d0b3be22ceb4d519838ac562cb2 High-ranking visit on the GSI/FAIR campus in Darmstadt: The Italian Ambassador H.E. Armando Varricchio was recently a guest at GSI and FAIR. Together with the Italian Consul General Andrea Esteban Samà from Frankfurt and Culture Attaché Dr. Michele Santoriello, he informed himself about the successes and perspectives of research at GSI and FAIR and took the opportunity to meet Italian scientists on site. High-ranking visit on the GSI/FAIR campus in Darmstadt: The Italian Ambassador H.E. Armando Varricchio was recently a guest at GSI and FAIR. Together with the Italian Consul General Andrea Esteban Samà from Frankfurt and Culture Attaché Dr. Michele Santoriello, he informed himself about the successes and perspectives of research at GSI and FAIR and took the opportunity to meet Italian scientists on site.

Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Marco Durante, Head of GSI's Biophysics Department, Professor Silvia Masciocchi, Head of the ALICE Research Group at GSI, and Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Press and Public Relations of GSI and FAIR, welcomed the Italian guests. The visit program focused on the current and planned research activities as well as the high-tech developments for FAIR, especially the Italian activities in this regard.

H.E. Ambassador Armando Varricchio is regarded as one of the most prominent and well-known diplomats of the Republic of Italy. He has broad international experience at various political levels and served as diplomatic advisor to several Italian Prime Ministers. He has been Italian Ambassador to Germany since June 2021, and previously served as Ambassador to the United States. During his visit, Armando Varricchio was impressed by the highly promising prospects opened up by the FAIR international accelerator center currently being built at GSI: "FAIR is a fascinating international project that offers unique opportunities and promotes new developments. The research and experiments at GSI and FAIR are important for scientific progress that benefits the entire society. I am pleased that Italy plays an important role here with the cooperation of many dedicated Italian scientists and the Italian high-tech industry."

"I am extremely pleased that we could warmly welcome Armando Varricchio to our institution. We are very honored that one of his first travels as ambassador to Germany is to our research facility. We would like to thank him for his great interest in our science," said Professor Paolo Giubellino. "The Italian science community and GSI/FAIR are closely linked. Researchers from Italy are making excellent contributions in a variety of scientific and technical fields at GSI and FAIR and Italy has a huge industrial return from the realization of high-tech components for FAIR. We hope to further strengthen this successful collaboration with Italy in the future."

Italy is strongly involved on the scientific and technological side with GSI/FAIR: Building on a long-standing collaboration between Italian research institutions such as the Italian National Nuclear Physics Institute (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, INFN) and GSI/FAIR, Italian researchers are represented in many fields and collaborations at GSI and FAIR. This for example refers to the field of biophysics with its wide thematic range from space research to tumor therapy, or to the large-scale experiment R3B, which allows reaction experiments with high-energy exotic nuclei. Moreover, over 40 GSI/FAIR employees are Italian, including the Scientific Managing Director and two heads of departments.

In addition, a number of important assignments for FAIR high-tech components are realized by Italian companies. For example, the superconducting magnets for the fragment separator (Super-FRS), the central apparatus of the NUSTAR experiment, are manufactured by ASG Superconductors and power converters by OCEM, both Italian companies. Further examples of important technological collaboration also exist at the large FAIR ring accelerator: Parts of the test program for the quadrupole module series are carried out at a test facility in Salerno, Italy.

During a guided tour, the guests were able to inform themselves in detail about FAIR. Some of the stations where young Italian researchers as well as responsible scientists gave insights into their work were the HADES experiment, the medical radiation unit of biophysics and the test facility for superconducting accelerator magnets. The guests were also able to see the progress of the construction work for the future accelerator center from the viewing platform located directly at the FAIR construction site. Afterwards, there was an opportunity for a meeting of the diplomatic visitors with Italian scientists and a short address of the ambassador to his compatriots working at GSI/FAIR. (BP)

About H.E. Ambassador Armando Varricchio

Armando Varricchio has been Italian Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany since June 21, 2021, after serving as Italian Ambassador to the United States since March 2, 2016. At the Permanent Representation of Italy to the European Union, as Head of Cabinet of the Minister for European Affairs and as Diplomatic Advisor to the President of the European Commission, Ambassador Varricchio dealt mainly with European and transatlantic issues. As Diplomatic Advisor to Prime Ministers Enrico Letta and Matteo Renzi, and previously as Assistant Diplomatic Advisor to President Giorgio Napolitano, he handled the most complicated international issues, particularly security issues.

As a personal representative ("Sherpa") at the G7/G8 and G20 summits, he dealt with the most important global issues, especially economic and financial issues, at both the national and European levels.

He was Ambassador in Belgrade and before that Head of the Economic Section of the Embassy in Washington, while as a young diplomat in Budapest he witnessed the dissolution of the Warsaw Pact and the Soviet Union. He graduated with honors (Laurea con lode) in international relations from the University of Padua and embarked on a diplomatic career in 1986, reaching the rank of ambassador in 2014. Previously, he worked in the private sector as assistant to the financial director of the Italian textile company Marzotto Group.

He is a recipient of the Grand Cross of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic and has received numerous honors from abroad.

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5157 Thu, 28 Oct 2021 08:42:00 +0200 GSI Biophysicists Dr. Christian Graeff and Dr. Burkhard Jakob receive professorships at TU Darmstadt https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5157&cHash=9cee13c3ec58b568101c1431ce5ee353 Two new professorships strengthen the profile of GSI/FAIR in research and teaching: Dr. Christian Graeff and Dr. Burkhard Jakob, both from GSI's Biophysics Department, will hold a teaching position as professors at the TU Darmstadt starting from the winter term. Two new professorships strengthen the profile of GSI/FAIR in research and teaching: Dr. Christian Graeff and Dr. Burkhard Jakob, both from GSI's Biophysics Department, will hold a teaching position as professors at the TU Darmstadt starting from the winter term.

Dr. Christian Graeff, who leads the Medical Physics group at GSI Biophysics, is a new professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology (ETIT) at TU Darmstadt. His teaching is within the framework of the Master's program in Medical Technology, which provides knowledge and skills in engineering and human medicine. After studying medical engineering at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg, Christian Graeff received his doctorate with a study on computer tomography-assisted diagnostics of osteoporosis. He worked as postdoc in the Medical Physics group of the Biophysics Department at GSI, before taking over as head of this group in 2012.

His research has focused on innovative applications of ion beams (for example, research on the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias with the use of carbon ions), the development of methods for irradiating moving targets with scanned ion beams and the development of new therapy control systems for raster scanning. For his scientific achievements, Christian Graeff was awarded the Günther von Pannewitz Prize of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) and the Behnken-Berger Prize for young scientists.

Dr. Burkhard Jakob, who heads Molecular Radiobiology and Imaging group within GSI Biophysics, is taking over an honorary professorship at the Department of Biology at TU Darmstadt; his teaching activities include, for example, conducting the master's module "Radiation Biophysics". After studying chemistry at the University of Würzburg, Burkhard Jakob obtained his PhD on oxidation-sensitive fluorescent dyes for the determination of ozone distribution in leaves. He joined GSI as a postdoc already in 1999, after that he worked in the Molecular Radiobiology group as a senior scientist before taking over as head of this group in 2019.

His research focuses on the biological effects and molecular and the microscopic visualization of cellular responses to ionizing radiation, as DNA damage and subsequent repair mechanisms especially following particle irradiation. For his scientific achievements, Burkhard Jakob received the prize of the German Society for Radiation Biology Research (GBS) for young scientists and the Hanns Langendorff Award for the first evidence of a localized DNA damage response in a cell nucleus after densely ionizing particle irradiation as well as the live cell microscopy measurements of dynamic repair processes at the GSI beamlines.

The Head of the Department, Marco Durante, who is already professor at TUDa-Physics said “I am very proud of the group leaders in the Biophysics Department. Their appointment at TUDa is a sign of the world-class science that our group is doing at GSI, and of the quality of the group leaders. GSI-Biophysics is world leader in research in heavy ion biological effects ad its applications in therapy and space”. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5155 Mon, 25 Oct 2021 08:00:00 +0200 Agreement strengthens link between GSI/FAIR and Polish universities https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5155&cHash=1bf106cc452e37ae4760b86ff36bce3c A new cooperation agreement strengthens the link between GSI/FAIR and the two Polish universities Wrocław University of Science and Technology (WUST) and University Wrocław (UWr). The agreement within the framework of the GET_INvolved program was signed recently in Dresden during the German-Polish-Czech Science Platform, an international science conference at the invitation of Federal Research Minister Anja Karliczek in cooperation with the Minister-President of Saxony Michael Kretschmer. A new cooperation agreement strengthens the link between GSI/FAIR and the two Polish universities Wrocław University of Science and Technology (WUST) and University Wrocław (UWr). The agreement within the framework of the GET_INvolved program was signed recently in Dresden during the German-Polish-Czech Science Platform, an international science conference at the invitation of Federal Research Minister Anja Karliczek in cooperation with the Minister-President of Saxony Michael Kretschmer.

The trilateral science platform was held under the theme "Cross-border innovations for Central Europe". Organized by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in close cooperation with the Free State of Saxony, the conference brought together high-ranking representatives from politics, science and research in Poland, the Czech Republic and Germany. Among others the President of the German Bundestag Wolfgang Schäuble, the Prime Minister of Poland Mateusz Morawiecki and Petr Očko, Deputy Minister at the Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic, participated.

The platform provided great visions in burning topics such sustainable regional cooperation, Industry 4.0, hydrogen based mobility options for future, industry participation in incubating more startups in a tri- or bilateral framework, existing partnerships and funding programs for mobility of young scientists and students, and also highlighted how can one benefit from exiting partnership. The participants discussed opportunities and challenges of research and innovation for the sustainable economic development of Central Europe.

On the second day, a panel discussion focused on German-Polish cooperation in multilateral-large facilities was held, moderated by Ms. Ministerial Conductor Dr. Oda Keppler from the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Professor Paolo Giubellino (Scientific Managing Director of GSI/FAIR, Germany), Alicja Nowakowska (Vice-Chair of Administrative and Finance Committee FAIR, Jagiellonian University Poland), and Professor Maciej Chorowski (Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland) were on the panel. The panel participants educated the audience on how the FAIR project has been an exemplary example of Polish-German cooperation, emphasizing the importance of an international effort, scientific collaboration, and strong business partnerships in bringing cutting-edge technology to big science infrastructure and to the market.

The event marked yet another step in the cooperation based on mutual interests between GSI/FAIR and the Polish universities with the aims to promote mobility opportunities for young students and researchers, create synergies between partners, and facilitate the creation of a framework for conducive capacity building for FAIR's future operation. At the signing ceremony, in presence of State Secretary Professor Wolf-Dieter Lukas, FAIR/GSI and the respective Polish university representatives Professor Przemyslaw Wiszewski, rector of the University of Wrocław, and Professor Maciej Chorowski, Wrocław University of Science and Technology, inked the respective partnership agreements with FAIR managing directors Dr. Ulrich Breuer and Professor Paolo Giubellino. The event was streamed live though the BMBF streaming platform on their website.

Professor Paolo Giubellino said: “The FAIR Project is an international endeavour to build a world-class facility for next-generation scientists. Poland is one of the founding members of FAIR. It brings me great satisfaction to see that two of the premier universities from Poland and FAIR/GSI team up to promote mobility opportunities and support early-stage researchers to cooperate in collaborative research in basic science and advance technologies. International collaborations are essential to improve research quality and to promote talent development. The GET_INvolved partnerships with the University of Wrocław and the Wrocław University of Science and Technology are examples of our fruitful collaboration with Polish universities in creating opportunities for young scientists”.

Professor Przemyslaw Wiszewski said: “The University of Wrocław wishes to conduct joint, top-quality international research together with other research centers. It is important to take advantage of our geographical location for this purpose. Here in Central Europe, where Poland, the Czech Republic and Germany meet, we hope to conduct research and projects that are important on a European scale. Our goal is that in a few years, Europe will hear about a strong international research consortium, in which scientists not only from our three countries work together, but to which, thanks to the strong scientific position, we attract outstanding researchers from all over the world.”

Professor Maciej Chorowski said: “Wrocław University of Science and Technology is a well-recognized center of excellence in cryogenics – a key superconducting high energy accelerator technology. Thanks to the construction of FAIR accelerator complex, we have a unique possibility to develop and deliver state of art components allowing cryostating of superconducting magnets and bus bars. The experience gained at FAIR and other Big Science laboratories allows us to participate actively in hydrogen driven transformation of power generation and mobility. The GET_INvolved partnership with FAIR will help students and young scientists to enter a global research community.”

Professor Dariusz Lydzba said: “At Wrocław University of Science and Technology we strive to become a major European research university. That is why developing international cooperation is so important to us. Not only to show the possibilities and laboratories that we have, but also to make it easier for the scientists from Wrocław Tech to access the solutions that our European partners have. This agreement proves it, but it is also a clear signal that the position of Wrocław University of Science and Technology is getting stronger. I believe that it will be a big step into the future for all the consortium members, and we will not have to wait long for the effects.” (BP)

Further information

For more information on the GET_INvolved program interested persons can contact the respective coordinators Dr. Pradeep Ghosh GSI und FAIR, Pradeep.Ghosh@fair-center.eu), Dr. Jaroslaw Polinksi (WUST, jaroslaw.polinski@pwr.edu.pl) and Professor Eugeniusz Zych (University of Wrocław, prorektor.nauka@uwr.edu.pl).

Related links
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5151 Thu, 21 Oct 2021 08:00:00 +0200 On the hunt for hypernuclei: The WASA detector at GSI/FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5151&cHash=b2ee0e9bdea0b670272f82743b49e84a With the WASA detector, a very special instrument is currently being set up at GSI/FAIR. Together with the fragment separator FRS, it will be used to produce and study so-called hypernuclei during the upcoming experiment period of FAIR Phase 0 in 2022. For this purpose, the assembly, which weighs several tons, is being transferred to the facility in a complex installation procedure. The scientific relevance of the planned experiments with hypernuclei is also shown by a recent review article in ... With the WASA detector, a very special instrument is currently being set up at GSI/FAIR. Together with the fragment separator FRS, it will be used to produce and study so-called hypernuclei during the upcoming experiment period of FAIR Phase 0 in 2022. For this purpose, the assembly, which weighs several tons, is being transferred to the facility in a complex installation procedure. The scientific relevance of the planned experiments with hypernuclei is also shown by a recent review article in the scientific journal “Nature Reviews Physics”, in which GSI/FAIR researchers play a leading role.

Very special exotic nuclei are in the focus of researchers in the upcoming experiment period: so-called hypernuclei. Regular atomic nuclei are made of protons and neutrons, which in turn are composed of a total of three up and down quarks. If one of these quarks is replaced by another type, a so-called strange quark, a hyperon is formed. Atomic nuclei that contain one or more hyperons are called hypernuclei. They can be produced in particle collisions at accelerators, and their decay can then be observed in experiment setups such as the WASA detector and the FRS in order to study their properties in detail.

Professor Takehiko Saito, leading scientist in the GSI/FAIR research pillar NUSTAR, is the first author of the paper “New directions in hypernuclear physics” in the journal Nature Reviews Physics, which highlights previous results, open questions and new possibilities in the field of hypernuclear research. “Hypernuclei could shed light on what happens inside neutron stars. According to current predictions, hypernuclei should exist there abundantly. However, some of their properties have not yet been accurately determined. Among other things, the researchers want to determine the binding energy and lifetimes of different hypernuclei more precisely in future experiments, as well as discover new variations,” Saito says. “For this purpose, the HypHI experiment, previously operated at GSI/FAIR, has already achieved exciting results, but has now reached its limits. The combination of WASA and FRS promises new insights and information. The detector has a higher detection efficiency for measuring all the decay products of the hypernuclei. In the future, the FAIR facility, which is currently being built, will also open up extensive new opportunities for the study of hypernuclei.”

WASA stands for “Wide Angle Shower Apparatus” and is designed to trace the tracks of large numbers of particles that are emitted in energetic nuclear collisions. Thus, the device is a huge, almost closed sphere, equipped with countless measuring instruments, some of which protrude outward like spikes. They consist of scintillators and gaseous detectors that can detect charged and neutral particles. Inside is a superconducting solenoid magnet that must be cooled to four Kelvin with liquid helium. Most of the detectors are currently improved by the international WASA@FRS collaboration. The Japanese team of the collaboration plays a leading role in the development and upgrade of the detector.

Responsible for the technical setup of the WASA detector at FRS are the two NUSTAR engineers Tobias Weber and Philipp Schwarz. “Due to the tight spatial constraints at the FRS, the compact and powerful WASA detector was the best choice for the planned experiments at FRS,” Weber explains. “We had to remove several parts of the FRS to make space available for WASA.” Schwarz adds: “To transport the detector to its final destination, we had to carefully move the delicate components, which weigh several tons, across our experiment halls via several overhead cranes. Fortunately, everything went well and according to schedule so far. Soon we will be able to start the commissioning at the FRS to ensure everything will be ready for the experiments next year.”

Prior to the installation at GSI/FAIR, WASA had already completed a number of experiment campaigns. The setup was originally used at the Svedberg Laboratory in Sweden and later at the COSY ring at Forschungszentrum Jülich. Its installation at FRS is also only temporary. Following the upcoming experiments, it will be removed and the FRS will again be ready for other NUSTAR experiments studying further exotic nuclei. (CP)

Further information
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FAIR News (DEU) NUSTAR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5153 Mon, 18 Oct 2021 08:00:00 +0200 SPARC PhD Award goes to Robert Klas https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5153&cHash=fa49cb315fc5d6f109e8d9a4a9a1915c Robert Klas of Helmholtz Institute Jena, a branch of GSI, has received this year's PhD Award of the SPARC Collaboration. The SPARC PhD Award 2021 was presented online during the 18th workshop of the collaboration in September. The award was given in recognition of Klas's PhD thesis “Efficiency Scaling of High Harmonic Generation using Ultrashort Fiber Lasers”. Robert Klas of Helmholtz Institute Jena, a branch of GSI, has received this year's PhD Award of the SPARC Collaboration. The SPARC PhD Award 2021 was presented online during the 18th workshop of the collaboration in September. The award was given in recognition of Klas's PhD thesis “Efficiency Scaling of High Harmonic Generation using Ultrashort Fiber Lasers”.

The work addresses high-power laser-driven sources in the XUV range as an alternative to large-scale light sources such as synchrotrons or free-electron lasers (FEL). These can be obtained, as Klas has shown, by high harmonic generation (HHG) of high average power ultrafast fiber lasers. Such laser-like XUV sources, which are less complex and more accessible to the user, nowadays find applications in lensless imaging or time-resolved spectroscopy. In particular, they can be combined with the storage ring facilities at GSI and FAIR for precision spectroscopy. This combination will enable unique research beyond today’s state of the art.

In this context, a proof-of-principle experiment targeting XUV photoionization of carbon ions based on a laser-driven table-top XUV source has been proposed, granted beam time, and conducted by the SPARC collaboration at CRYRING in 2019 and 2021. Klas provided groundbreakting contributions during his doctoral studies to enable XUV laser spectroscopy at heavy ion storage rings for the first time. The work was carried out at Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering in Jena, and the Helmholtz Institute Jena.

The SPARC PhD Award has been presented annually since 2018 and comes with a prize money of 200 euros. The award honors the best PhD thesis within the collaboration concerning atomic physics with heavy ions at the research facilities of GSI and FAIR. SPARC stands for Stored Particles Atomic Physics Research Collaboration. Currently, more than 400 members from 26 countries belong to the collaboration. They are experimenting with the existing atomic physics facilities at GSI and preparing new experiments and setups at the future FAIR accelerator. (CP)

Furter information

 

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5143 Mon, 11 Oct 2021 08:00:00 +0200 HELIAC linear accelerator progresses: Cryomodule tested https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5143&cHash=77bb60a83898dad3e848bd0d31c67ab3 The HElmholtz LInear ACcelerator HELIAC is a continuous-wave linear accelerator planned at GSI/FAIR that opens up new research opportunities with its continuous particle beam. The first cryogenic accelerator module for HELIAC, the so-called Advanced Demonstrator, has now been cooled down to four Kelvin with liquid helium and tested. The HElmholtz LInear ACcelerator HELIAC is a continuous-wave linear accelerator planned at GSI/FAIR that opens up new research opportunities with its continuous particle beam. The first cryogenic accelerator module for HELIAC, the so-called Advanced Demonstrator, has now been cooled down to four Kelvin with liquid helium and tested.

The cryostat of the HELIAC demonstrator has a length of five meters in total. In the future, it will contain three accelerator cavities of Crossbar H-mode (CH) type, as well as a beam focusing cavity (buncher). These components are still being tested or manufactured. This is why, for now, externally identical dummy cavities were installed, which do not contain the internal structures. They are used to ascertain the mechanical behavior of the module under cooling. Two finalized solenoid lenses and two steering elements — both superconducting — are already installed.

For the first time, the demonstrator has now been successfully cooled down to four Kelvin using liquid helium from the GSI magnet test facility. The superconducting solenoid lenses were used to focus heavy ion beams from the GSI high-charge injector through the cryomodule and keep them on axis using correction coils.

“Thus, all relevant transverse beam optical investigations could already be successfully performed with the setup. This means that an important milestone in the commissioning of the module has been achieved,” explains Professor Winfried Barth, head of the Section 1 for Accelerators and Integrated Detectors at the Helmholtz Institute Mainz and, at the same time, head of the GSI “Linac” department. The Helmholtz Institute Mainz, a branch of GSI, is responsible for all R&D-activities in order to realize the HELIAC project.

“Shortly, the Advanced Demonstrator will be transported to the Superconducting Radio Frequency Laboratory of the Helmholtz Institute in Mainz, which provides unique manufacturing infrastructure and the high-purity conditions for the final assembly of the cryogenic module,” adds his deputy and HELIAC project manager Dr. Maksym Miski-Oglu. “The next step there will be to integrate the three functional CH cavities and the buncher into the cryomodule. Final commissioning with heavy-ion beam is planned for mid-2022 at GSI/FAIR.”

The HELIAC CH-cavities, which are also superconducting, can accelerate heavy ions with high efficiency. Because of its continuous-wave mode of operation, the setup is also known as a cw linac. Several experimental areas shall benefit from the continuous particle beam in the future, such as superheavy elements research and materials research. (CP)

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Aktuelles
news-5149 Thu, 07 Oct 2021 11:00:00 +0200 New sensor for SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses based on GSI nanotechnology https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5149&cHash=00ed5ee7f020349cca1ee3c26ea967d5 Easy and fast detection of viruses are crucial in a pandemic. Based on single-nanopore membranes of GSI, an international interdisciplinary team of researchers developed a test method that detects SARS-CoV-2 in saliva, without sample pretreatment, with the same sensitivity as a qPCR test, and in only 2 hours. On top, the sensor can distinguish infectious from non-infectious corona viruses — a crucial innovation. Easy and fast detection of viruses are crucial in a pandemic. Based on single-nanopore membranes of GSI, an international interdisciplinary team of researchers developed a test method that detects SARS-CoV-2 in saliva, without sample pretreatment, with the same sensitivity as a qPCR test, and in only 2 hours. On top, the sensor can distinguish infectious from non-infectious corona viruses a crucial innovation.

By linking different technologies, an interdisciplinary team of scientist of the Materials Research Department of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, the National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET) in Argentina and the University of Illinois in the USA, has developed a highly sensitive nanopore sensor that specifically detects SARS-CoV-2 viruses and human adenoviruses in a variety of specimen including saliva, serum or environmental samples such as wastewater. The sensor combines two key components: a sensitive nanochannel and highly specific DNA molecules attached to the channel surface. According to the research groups, the method is as precise as PCR tests, but simpler and faster providing results in less than two hours. The results are published in the prestigious journal Science Advances.

The technology for the fabrication of membranes with single nanopores has been developed at GSI over many years. Thin polymer films are irradiated with one individual high-energy heavy ion projectile (e.g. 1 GeV gold ion) at the linear accelerator UNILAC. As the ion passes through the film, it creates a nanoscopic damage trail that is converted into an open nanochannel by chemical etching. The precise diameter and the shape of the channel are adjusted by the etching parameters. For this work, asymmetric nanopores with a small opening of less than 50 nanometers were fabricated. The small size and the specific geometry ensures a particularly high level of sensitivity for transport processes through the channel.

The selectivity of the sensor is provided by an in-vitro selection process for DNA fragments, so-called aptamers, which are incorporated into the nanopore. These selective aptamers are not only able to recognize the specific virus but can also differentiate the infectivity status of the virus. The here applied aptamers were developed by Ana Sol Peinetti during her work as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Being familiar with the GSI nanopore technology from her previous stay in the group of Omar Azzaroni, at the Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physicochemical Research (INIFTA, CONICET-UNLP) (Argentina), she successfully combined both technologies. 

The fact that this method can distinguish infectious from noninfectious viruses is an essential innovation, according to the scientists. The well-known PCR tests detect viral genetic material but cannot distinguish whether a sample is infectious or whether a person is contagious. The only tests which can currently detect infectious viruses are plaque assays. They require special preparation and days of incubation before providing results, while the new aptamer-nanopore sensor yields results within 30 minutes up to two hours and requires no pre-treatment of the sample. 

Reading out the infectivity status of a virus not only provides information about whether patients are contagious or not, but also offers a way of finding out if certain inactivation strategies actually work. “Together with Omar Azzaroni and Ana Sol Peinetti (now group leader at the Institute of Chemistry, Physics of Materials, Environment and Energy, in Buenos Aires), we collaborate in a new project, where based on this new sensor the efficiency of various virus inactivation protocols will be tested,” states Maria Eugenia Toimil-Molares, leader of the ion-track nanotechnology group at GSI. 

Nanopore-sensor technology also has great potential beyond the Corona pandemic. "To detect other viruses, you have to look for the pool of molecules that serve as aptamers; new molecules for new viruses. We even intend to obtain aptamers that can discern between different variants of SARS-Cov-2," explains Peinetti. In the paper, the authors also demonstrate the detection of infectious human adenoviruses, responsible for respiratory water-borne diseases worldwide. 

Beyond the virus detection, the GSI nanopore technology is the basis of other sensor options. Numerous groups around the world are developing specific functionalization strategies to impart selective functionalities to nanopore sensors. Nanopores in ion-track membranes are very versatile because they can be modified to respond to many different external changes, such as temperature, pH, light, voltage, or the presence of specific ion species, molecules, or drugs. During the last years, several highly sensitive nanopore-sensor platforms have been developed in collaboration with the colleagues at INIFTA. “Our vision is to integrate the functionalized nanopore membrane into a portable device for rapid and efficient virus detection and diagnosis,” says Christina Trautmann, head of the GSI Materials Research Department. (LW)

More Informationen

Original publication Direct detection of human adenovirus and SARS-CoV-2 with ability to inform infectivity using a DNA aptamer-nanopore sensor

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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5147 Mon, 04 Oct 2021 12:59:02 +0200 Helmholtz Academy for research at the particle accelerator FAIR founded https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5147&cHash=d33772cd315db17e4dba74860cce3958 The Hessian Ministry of Higher Education, Research, Science and the Arts has approved the foundation of a research academy to further the involvement of Hessian universities in the FAIR particle accelerator and will fund it with three million euros per year. The new Helmholtz Research Academy Hesse for FAIR (HFHF), with three locations in Darmstadt, Frankfurt and Giessen, will support FAIR-focused science at Technical University of Darmstadt, Goethe University Frankfurt and Justus Liebig University Giessen This text is based on a press release by the Hessian Ministry of Higher Education, Research, Science and the Arts

The Hessian Ministry of Higher Education, Research, Science and the Arts has approved the foundation of a research academy to further the involvement of Hessian universities in the FAIR particle accelerator and will fund it with three million euros per year. The new Helmholtz Research Academy Hesse for FAIR (HFHF), with three locations in Darmstadt, Frankfurt and Giessen, will support FAIR-focused science at Technical University of Darmstadt, Goethe University Frankfurt and Justus Liebig University Giessen.

“With FAIR, a globally unique facility is being built that is also of outstanding importance for the Hessian research landscape,” explains Hesse's Science Minister Angela Dorn. “With the particle accelerator, it will be possible to investigate the structure of matter and the development of the Universe from the Big Bang to the present. The topics range from fundamental knowledge to the development of novel applications for technology and medicine. Hesse's universities are to play a leading role in this. The bright minds of tomorrow will also benefit from this source of knowledge — Hesse's young scientists and students. This is why we are establishing the Helmholtz Research Academy Hessen for FAIR.”

The international large research facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) is being built as a non-university research facility next to the site of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. As an institution spanning across universities, the research academy is to expand the expertise in the FAIR research areas available at the three universities and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), and establish it in the long term. The state has already supported FAIR-oriented research at the universities within the framework of the LOEWE Excellence Initiative, thus enabling the establishment of around 30 new professorships. The HFHF is now mainly dedicated to promoting talented young researchers.

“As FAIR promises world-class research for several decades, it is essential to attract and nurture the best young scientists today in order to make the most of these long-term opportunities. The Research Academy enables us to achieve this goal at the universities and to play a leading role in FAIR research,” emphasizes Professor Dr. Dr.-Ing. Peter Kämpfer, spokesperson of the HFHF Board and Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies at the Justus Liebig University in Gießen.

The scientific orientation of the HFHF is coordinated by eight directors who hold professorships at HFHF partner universities and are internationally renowned experts in the various research fields of FAIR. The Managing Director of the Research Academy, Professor Dr. Dr. h. c. Marcus Bleicher of Goethe University Frankfurt, sees the new institution as a unique opportunity: “The funding of the Research Academy will allow me and my colleagues at the partner institutions to conduct long-term FAIR-oriented research at a high international level and to play a leading role in the various FAIR research areas.”

An international evaluation committee reviewed HFHF's research plan for 2021 to 2025 very favorably and recommended it for implementation. “In the expert panel, we were very impressed with the research plan that was submitted to us for evaluation. On this basis, the research academy will be able to achieve excellent scientific results and secure a leading role for the Hessian universities in FAIR research,” says Professor Karl-Heinz Kampert, astroparticle physicist at the University of Wuppertal and chairman of the evaluation committee, summarizing the result.

The three universities participating in the research academy contribute a total of 5 million euros annually to the academic endowment of the HFHF. “The promotion of excellent young scientists and the cooperation with GSI is worth it to us,” emphasizes Professor Dr. Barbara Albert, Vice President for Research and Early Careers at the TU Darmstadt.

GSI flanks the funding via bilateral collaborations with research groups of the partner universities and FIAS in the financial scope of 3 million euros per year also. “GSI and later FAIR as well as our Hessian partners will benefit greatly from continuing this tradition in the long term. It is essential for our center not only to enable cutting-edge research, but also to inspire young scientists for this research. We have succeeded through our close cooperation with the universities. HFHF will not only continue this tradition, but also expand it further, for the benefit of research in general, but above all to secure Hesse as a location for science,” enthuses Professor Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR and Professor of Nuclear Physics at the TU Darmstadt. (HMWK/BP)

Further information

The Helmholtz Research Academy Hesse for FAIR

Press release by the Hessian Ministry of Higher Education, Research, Science and the Arts

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5145 Fri, 01 Oct 2021 10:00:00 +0200 Online events "Meet a scientist": Discuss with researchers as a school class https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5145&cHash=1aea3f76d5594877ab4155f0b60e3337 What happens in a supernova explosion? Why do we accelerate particles? What does the work of researchers involve? High-school students can get to the bottom of these and many other questions in the interactive online events of "Meet a scientist". From October 25 to November 5, 2021, school classes will have the opportunity to talk directly with scientists from the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt. What happens in a supernova explosion? Why do we accelerate particles? What does the work of researchers involve? High-school students can get to the bottom of these and many other questions in the interactive online events of "Meet a scientist". From October 25 to November 5, 2021, school classes will have the opportunity to talk directly with scientists from the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt.

The one-hour events begin with a short lecture on the research topic of the scientists, after which they are available for a discussion with the students. “This should not be limited to scientific questions, but can also be about the everyday life of researchers. Students are invited to also talk about other aspects such as choosing a course of study, career, work-life balance or gender aspects,” says project manager and initiator Dr. Arjan Vink, head of the GSI/FAIR Grant Office. “These deeper insights into science are intended to provide an incentive for young people to consider a career in science in their upcoming choice of profession.”

The more than 20 participating researchers from GSI and FAIR were specifically prepared in previous workshops to answer the questions of the students, aided by technical equipment for video conferences, which was acquired especially for the project. All scientific topics related to GSI and FAIR are covered: Whether construction and operation of accelerators, work on giant detectors for measuring nuclear reactions, events in the Universe, research into new, super-heavy elements or tumor therapy with ion beams — experts are available for all these and many more research areas. Career stages from PhD students to professors are represented to provide insight into career paths.

The events take place online as video conferences. High-school teachers can request appointments to "Meet a scientist" as a class. Classes can then dial into the events either as individuals or as a group. An overview of participating scientists, available times, and how to participate can be found at www.gsi.de/meet-a-scientist. Interested parties can register directly on the web or contact meetascientist(at)gsi.de with any queries. If demand is high, the project will possibly continue beyond the two weeks.

The pilot project "Meet a scientist" is supported by the Hessian Ministry of Science (HMWK) and Arts and by the Helmholtz Research Academy Hessen for FAIR (HFHF). (CP)

Further information:
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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5141 Fri, 24 Sep 2021 11:46:21 +0200 GSI and FAIR at "Highlights of Physics 2021" https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5141&cHash=0658657dd53aa2a38b4fc81da458b4a6 From 27 September to 2nd October, 2021, the big science festival "Highlights of Physics" will take place in Würzburg. The central element is a large hands-on exhibition on the market square. Scientists from all over Germany will present their research there and will be available for questions, explanations and discussions. GSI and FAIR are also represented with a booth and offer facts and entertainment around the future particle accelerator facility FAIR - the universe in the lab. This message is based on a press release of Highlights of Physics

From 27 September to 2nd October, 2021, the big science festival "Highlights of Physics" will take place in Würzburg. The central element is a large hands-on exhibition on the market square. Scientists from all over Germany will present their research there and will be available for questions, explanations and discussions. GSI and FAIR are also represented with a booth and offer facts and entertainment around the future particle accelerator facility FAIR - the universe in the lab. 

At the GSI and FAIR booth on the market place, the accelerator game attracts the public: Young and old can try out for themselves how a particle accelerator works and learn more about one of the largest construction projects for fundamental research. Those who are not on site in Würzburg can still participate: The exhibition can be visited on three days via live stream on YouTube. On Friday, October 1, the GSI and FAIR booth will also be presented. In a subsequent live chat, all online viewers can ask questions and participate interactively. 

In addition to the exhibition, there will be daily science shows on the open-air stage at the marketplace, a varied lecture program, live experiments, and an extensive online offering with an interactive children's program. A daily lecture program will take place in the Audimax of the University of Würzburg, as will the Phänomikon hands-on exhibition. With an exciting mix of an interactive on-site program and digital offerings, physicists will provide an X-ray view into space and show, for example, how lasers can be used to track down greenhouse gases. In addition, the latest developments for quantum computers will be presented, as well as many other interesting topics where physics plays an important role in our lives. With the daily lecture series "Röntgenblicke," the organizers of the "Highlights of Physics" will commemorate the 175th birthday of Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen last year.

The week-long physics spectacle kicked off on September 27 with the big Highlights Show at the s.Oliver Arena with ARD presenter Ranga Yogeshwar (watch now on YouTube). The week of events will conclude with a special evening lecture in which Communicator Award winner Prof. Metin Tolan will explore the question of whether scenes from James Bond films are physically possible at all; the lecture will be accompanied by live James Bond film music performed by the Würzburg Philharmonic Orchestra. Both events can also be seen in the YouTube live stream.

The "Highlights of Physics" are organized by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the German Physical Society (DPG) and the University of Würzburg. The "Highlights of Physics" were launched in 2001 by the BMBF and the DPG. In recent years, they have attracted up to 60,000 visitors.
Admission to all events is free (in some cases free admission tickets or registration are required). The conditions and infection control measures required for on-site visits can be found here. (LW)
 

Further information
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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5139 Tue, 21 Sep 2021 15:09:01 +0200 New magnets for FAIR tested at CERN https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5139&cHash=5b667c82798c2c4773e465e8da4cbd58 The very first superconducting magnets for NUSTAR (Nuclear Structure Astrophysics and Reactions) have been tested at the European research center CERN in Switzerland. NUSTAR is one of the four large experiment pillars at the future international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), which is currently being built at GSI. ­This text is based on a news by the European research organisation CERN

The very first superconducting magnets for NUSTAR (Nuclear Structure Astrophysics and Reactions) have been tested at the European research center CERN in Switzerland. NUSTAR is one of the four large experiment pillars at the future international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), which is currently being built at GSI.

As part of a collaboration agreement between CERN and GSI/FAIR signed in 2012, 56 magnet assemblies intended for the Super-Fragment Separator (Super-FRS), the central device of the NUSTAR experiment, will be entirely tested and validated at CERN. Thus, 32 multiplets and 24 dipoles will be tested at the Laboratory. The multiplets are manufactured by the Italian company ASG, the dipoles by the Spanish company Elytt. For this purpose, a new test facility has been especially designed and constructed in CERN’s Building #180 to validate no fewer than 30 types of magnets. Three test benches have been created by experts from CERN and GSI to accommodate up to 7-metre-long, 3.5-metre-high magnet assemblies. The heaviest ones weigh up to 70 tons.

“A large and complex cryogenic system has been developed, combining two pre-cooling/warming-up units and a 4.5 K liquid helium refrigerator,” explains Antonio Perin, work package leader for the cryogenic system. “The plant is designed for continuous operation: the validation tests are performed on one bench, while the second bench is cooling down and the third one is warming up; the test sequence lasts about six weeks for each magnet.” During the tests, the magnets are powered to their nominal current and their magnetic field is accurately mapped. The powering and magnetic measurement systems have been adapted to the new test facility, which was made possible thanks to the unique combination of competences existing at CERN.

“We are currently testing the first-of-series magnets; the multiplet series will be delivered next year. All 56 magnet assemblies should be tested by 2026,” says Dr. Germana Riddone, CERN’s technical coordinator of the test facility at CERN. “Many CERN groups and GSI partners have been involved in the successful installation of the new test facility and its commissioning, and still are now for the validation tests. The collaboration with GSI is a very good example of how CERN works hand-in-hand with national infrastructures and how that adds mutual value.” Dr. Antonella Chiuchiolo, GSI work package leader for on-site testing at CERN, agrees: "We are very pleased that our testing activities at CERN can proceed so smoothly and on schedule."

The Project Leader Super-FRS at GSI/FAIR, Dr. Haik Simon, was also very pleased with the start of the tests and explains: “The multiplets will later be used in FAIR's Super-FRS for beam focusing in order to achieve a high-precision particle beam. The dipoles will serve later to specifically deflect a split up the particle beam“. The Super-FRS of the future FAIR accelerator center is an important component of the entire facility with great potential for scientific discovery: This part of the accelerator complex will be used for experiments on the fundamental structure of extremely rare exotic nuclei. “For these experiments, ions of the heaviest elements will be shot at a target, where they will shatter upon impact. The resulting fragments will include exotic nuclei that the Super-FRS can separate and supply for further experiments. With the new separator, nuclei up to uranium can be produced at relativistic energies and can be separated into pure isotopes. Because this entire process lasts for only a few hundred nanoseconds, the Super-FRS provides researchers access to very short-lived nuclei,” says Dr. Haik Simon. (CERN/BP)

Further information

News at the CERN website

Video about the Super-FRS magnet testing

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5135 Thu, 16 Sep 2021 08:37:00 +0200 First Heavy Ion Therapy Masterclass School held online https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5135&cHash=dc49555062f123d5f95f8c56c4b0e2f3 Recently, the first international Heavy Ion Therapy Masterclass (HITM) school was held online for the duration of a full week. The school focused on treatment planning in heavy ion therapy, but also covered the entire path to deliver the beam to the tumor. It was organized within the framework of the EU-funded HITRIplus (Heavy Ion Therapy Research Integration) project, a large consortium where GSI leads the Transnational Access and participates in Joint Research Activities. Recently, the first international Heavy Ion Therapy Masterclass (HITM) school was held online for the duration of a full week. The school focused on treatment planning in heavy ion therapy, but also covered the entire path to deliver the beam to the tumor. It was organized within the framework of the EU-funded HITRIplus (Heavy Ion Therapy Research Integration) project, a large consortium where GSI leads the Transnational Access and participates in Joint Research Activities. This first course of HITRIplus, coordinated by GSI with strong support of the HITRIplus partners, was attended by more than thousand participants, ranging from undergrad students up to early stage researchers.

The participants of the HITM school were presented with a multidisciplinary approach which started from basic concepts, included state-of-the-art practices and methods, and involved discussions of open points and needed research, as well as future plans for upcoming upgrades and developments. While overview lectures, partly delivered by GSI experts, provided the necessary broad panorama, specialized presentations and hands-on sessions focused on the treatment planning details. These were based on the matRad open-source professional toolkit, developed by the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) in Heidelberg specifically for training and research.

Expert matRad tutors from DKFZ and LMU guided participants from software installation to the execution of involved treatment planning cases, demonstrating the benefits, but also the challenges of heavy-ion therapy compared to different treatment modalities. Approx. 200 participants delivered their hands-on results, which was awarded with a certificate of attendance.

The course used informative videos of the European heavy-ion therapy centers and research infrastructures, including GSI/FAIR, included real-time virtual visits to these labs and offered numerous opportunities for interaction with their experts. GSI experts also participated in dedicated sessions, where students presented their results and research projects as well as in the evening social events providing information on future career paths.

The online mode made the school easily accessible worldwide: Over thousand participants, almost equally distributed between European and non-European countries, ranging from undergraduate students to practitioners, followed all or parts of the program. These unprecedented high numbers, as well as the received comments, show an increasing interest in heavy-ion therapy, the technology introduced in Europe by GSI.

Within the HITRIplus project, promising early stage researchers will be candidates to be further supported by the upcoming HITRIplus schools on clinical and medical aspects, as well as by HITRIplus internships. Thus, they can optimally access the existing European heavy-ion therapy centers and research facilities, among which GSI/FAIR, contributing to relevant research projects, upgrades and future developments.

The format of the HITM school was inspired by the Particle Therapy MasterClasses (PTMC), a project also coordinated by GSI, that in 2021 attracted more than 1500 high-school students in 20 countries and 37 institutes. Several of the HITM school participants were eager to participate in future PTMC projects as tutors and moderators further motivating the younger generations.

The HITRIplus project, that has received funds from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 101008548, motivated by the response and success of this first course is preparing already the next courses based on the uplifting received feedback of numerous grateful participants. (CP)

Further information
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Aktuelles
news-5137 Tue, 14 Sep 2021 10:40:43 +0200 Member of the Bundestag Till Mansmann visits GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5137&cHash=f8643f0a51c341b9c46dabbd3351a2b4 Member of the Bundestag Till Mansmann recently visited GSI and FAIR. He informed himself about the scientific activities and the progress of the future accelerator center FAIR, which is currently being built at GSI. The guest was welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, as well as Carola Pomplun from the Press and Public Relations D Member of the Bundestag Till Mansmann recently visited GSI and FAIR. He informed himself about the scientific activities and the progress of the future accelerator center FAIR, which is currently being built at GSI. The guest was welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, as well as Carola Pomplun from the Press and Public Relations Department at GSI and FAIR.

After introductory information on the status of the FAIR construction project, the campus development, previous research successes and current experiments, the FDP politician and a physicist by education was given insights into the existing research facilities on the GSI and FAIR campus during a guided tour. The tour included the test facility for superconducting accelerator magnets, where mainly high-tech components for FAIR are tested, the linear accelerator UNILAC, the SHIP experiment, where the GSI elements 107 to 112 were produced, and the energy-efficient supercomputing center Green IT Cube.

After this, Till Mansmann had the opportunity to get an overview of the entire construction site and the activities in the northern and southern construction areas from the viewing platform on the edge of the construction site. Subsequently, the FAIR construction site and the progresses there were visited at close range during a tour. One highlight was the walk-through of the recently completed underground accelerator tunnel. The central ring accelerator SIS100 will be the heart of the future facility.

Also shown was the CBM experiment, which is well advanced in construction. The unique CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter) experiment is one of the four research pillars of the future FAIR accelerator facility. The focus is on the investigation of highly compressed baryonic matter, as it exists in neutron stars and in the center of supernova explosions.

The development in the south of the construction field is also progressing well: This includes the structural work for six buildings and for a futher experimental facility – the superconducting fragment separator (Super-FRS). It will focus on research topics concerning the nuclear structure and interactions of extremely rare, exotic particles. The bus tour was completed with a stop at the large container facility on the southwestern edge of the FAIR construction site. From there, the construction planning for FAIR and the coordination of the FAIR construction site takes place. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5131 Thu, 09 Sep 2021 07:13:00 +0200 GLAD and COCOTIER: Two French FAIR contributions to R3B experiment in operation https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5131&cHash=a9fb9a874a915aea49b4edbc2fe2873a Two state-of-the-art instruments, GLAD and COCOTIER, were designed and built at the Institute of Research into the Fundamental Laws of the Universe (Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l’Univers, IRFU) in Saclay, France, recently and are now operational in the R3B experimental site of GSI. In the future, both will be used at FAIR, the international accelerator facility currently under construction at GSI. This text is based on a news release by the Institute of Research into the Fundamental Laws of the Universe (IRFU).

Two state-of-the-art instruments, GLAD and COCOTIER, were designed and built at the Institute of Research into the Fundamental Laws of the Universe (Institut de recherche sur les lois fondamentales de l’Univers, IRFU) in Saclay, France, recently and are now operational in the R3B experimental site of GSI. In the future, both will be used at FAIR, the international accelerator facility currently under construction at GSI.

GLAD is a large acceptance spectrometer for the analysis of relativistic radioactive heavy ion beam reactions. It was installed on site in 2015 and saw beam for the first time in fall of 2018. In some experiments, these beams will interact upstream with the COCOTIER liquid hydrogen target. The latter has just been used for the first time in the FAIR Phase 0 experiments in March 2021. These two pieces of equipment are key elements for measuring the properties of nuclei at the limit of nuclear stability and allow current nuclear models to evolve towards more predictive ones.

GLAD: a large acceptance dipole for GSI/FAIR

Following the successful testing of the cold mass (screen, vacuum chamber) of the GLAD magnet, (22 tons at 4.5 Kelvin) at Saclay in a cryogenic test station of IRFU, GLAD had been installed in its cryostat and transported to GSI, where it was installed in the experimental halls. It was positioned, as well as connected to its power supply and to its cooling system by GSI teams. Following a beam test in the fall of 2018, GLAD was successfully used in the 2019, 2020 and also the 2021 R3B FAIR Phase 0 campaigns, where for the first time the COCOTIER target was employed.

COCOTIER: a liquid hydrogen target

The COCOTIER (COrrélations à COurte porTée et spin IsotopiquE à R3B – for short-range Correlations and Isotopic spin at R3B) liquid hydrogen target is designed to perform quasi-free scattering experiments where the nucleus to be studied, in the form of a beam, impacts on a target of protons that will selectively eject a proton or a neutron from the nucleus in question. To compensate for the low intensity of the exotic beams, dense (hence the need to liquefy hydrogen) and very thick (up to 15 centimeters) proton targets are used. It is therefore necessary to reconstruct the position of the reaction vertex inside the target using a tracking detector. This information is necessary to perform the spectroscopy of the studied nuclei in order to correct the trajectories and the energy loss of the measured particles.

To liquefy hydrogen at pressures close to atmospheric pressure, it must be cooled to cryogenic temperatures (21 Kelvin). The hydrogen is liquefied in a condenser cooled by a cryocooler and flows into the target cell due to gravity. Turbomolecular pumping allows to obtain a high vacuum (10-6 millibar in the cryostat and in the target chamber) in order to limit the convective flows. The integration into the constrained R3B setup posed many challenges. The target is placed in the middle of the CALIFA calorimeter, far from the vertical of the cryostat.

The target cell is wrapped in several five micrometers thick multi-layer insulation sheets in order to reduce the radiation heat flux, especially from the tracking detectors placed at 25 millimeters in the same reaction chamber and which allow to reconstruct the position of the reaction vertex inside the target. Three target lengths of 15 millimeters, 50 millimeters and 150 millimeters were produced to meet the requirements of the experiments approved by the GSI experiment committee.

The target system was funded by the French Research Agency as a so-called in-kind contribution with the aim of pursuing the study of short-range correlations in exotic nuclei. It was designed and built at IRFU and installed at the end of 2019 at GSI by IRFU teams.

Remote operation during the pandemic

The system is controlled by a supervision system, developed at IRFU, which centralizes the information coming from the programmable logic controller and the various controllers. The system allows connecting and remote piloting via a secured internet client. During the recent FAIR Phase 0 scientific experiments this allowed in particular to perform all filling and monitoring operations of the target remotely, which was necessary due to the absence of the IRFU team on site because of the pandemic. (CP)

Further information
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5133 Mon, 06 Sep 2021 08:18:00 +0200 "The Art of Science at GSI and FAIR"- Illustrated book with unique works by artists and designers https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5133&cHash=dbc54b097bde0a1dcbf4aee8df547d7a A new illustrated book shows research at GSI and FAIR from the perspective of art and design. The network of Urban Sketchers Rhein-Main and students of the Hochschule für Gestaltung in Offenbach visited GSI and FAIR and developed their individual views on the experimental facilities and the scientific topics and reproduced them in pictures. The multitude of fascinating drawings and sketches can now be admired in an illustrated book published by GSI/FAIR. The bilingual illustrated book is available ... A new illustrated book shows research at GSI and FAIR from the perspective of art and design. The network of Urban Sketchers Rhein-Main and students of the Hochschule für Gestaltung in Offenbach visited GSI and FAIR and developed their individual views on the experimental facilities and the scientific topics and reproduced them in pictures. The multitude of fascinating drawings and sketches can now be admired in an illustrated book published by GSI/FAIR. The bilingual illustrated book is available in the Darmstadt Shop (Luisenplatz) and on site at GSI/FAIR.

"The human spirit shines brightest where splendor of art unites with splendor of science," said the 19th century scholar Emil Heinrich du Bois-Reymond. Drawers and designers at GSI and FAIR have taken up this challenge and captured on paper both, the visible world of particle accelerators with their magnets and detectors and the invisible world of atoms, forces and structures. The results impressively show the wide variety of perceptions, viewpoints, and modes of representation at the limits of human imagination and at the limits of what is technically possible.

In January 2020, the Urban Sketchers Rhine-Main visited the research facilities of GSI and FAIR with about 40 people for a sketching excursion. Urban Sketchers is a global network of artists who draw the places in which they live or to which they travel, capturing what they see from direct observation. Their mission is to "show the world, one drawing at a time." In the summer of 2020, 12 students from the Offenbach University of Applied Sciences (HfG) spent a week on the GSI/FAIR campus for the workshop "Sketching as a visual means of conveying knowledge at the interface between design and science." They drew experiment setups and accelerators, but were also introduced to the world of experimental physics - from the idea of the experiment, to the technical execution and the data analysis. A selection of the works created during these two visits can be seen in the illustrated book "The Art of Science at GSI and FAIR".

The illustrated book invites to look at science and technology from different angles. As means of expression, art and design enable people to reflect on scientific and technical topics in a very special way. The illustrated book is now available at the GSI/FAIR shop and in Darmstadt at the Darmstadt Shop at the Luisenplatz (price: 24 euros). (LW)

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FAIR News (DEU) Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5125 Tue, 31 Aug 2021 08:00:00 +0200 Pi, Star Trek and the Arctic — Lecture series „Wissenschaft für Alle“ of GSI and FAIR stays digital https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5125&cHash=b4bb957e003d5afedbf2e1e007afb3f2 The lecture series “Wissenschaft für Alle” by GSI and FAIR will continue in online format in the second half of 2021. Interested parties can join the videoconferences via a dial-in link using a web-enabled device such as a laptop, smartphone or tablet. The program begins on Wednesday, September 15, 2021, with a talk about the number pi by Professor Albrecht Beutelspacher, Director of the Mathematikum in Gießen. The lecture series “Wissenschaft für Alle” by GSI and FAIR will continue in online format in the second half of 2021. Interested parties can join the videoconferences via a dial-in link using a web-enabled device such as a laptop, smartphone or tablet. The program begins on Wednesday, September 15, 2021, with a talk about the number pi by Professor Albrecht Beutelspacher, Director of the Mathematikum in Gießen.

On the occasion of the 314th lecture of the series " Wissenschaft für Alle " (Pi is often given as 3.14 in short form), Professor Beutelspacher gets to the bottom of the number. Pi has fascinated humankind for thousands of years, because while this number can be explained quite simply on the one hand, it is very difficult to calculate and plays a role in surprisingly many areas of mathematics on the other hand. In the lecture all these aspects will be presented, partly supported by small experiments. A lecture that is entertaining and instructive.

Professor Albrecht Beutelspacher studied mathematics, physics and philosophy at the University of Tübingen and was subsequently awarded his doctorate and habilitation at the University of Mainz. He has been a professor at the University of Gießen since 1988. Since 2002, he has been the founding director of the Mathematikum, the world's first hands-on mathematical museum.

The following lecture by Professor Markus Roth from the Technical University of Darmstadt will take a closer look at the physics of the popular science fiction universe Star Trek in October. In November, Dr. Julia Regnery from the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven will report on MOSAiC, the largest Arctic expedition ever undertaken. At the end of the year in December, Dr. Daniel Severin of GSI/FAIR, together with other colleagues, will report on the scientific experiments during the last operational phase of the GSI/FAIR accelerator facility in the traditional Christmas lecture.

The lectures start at 2 p. m., further information about access and the course of the event can be found on the event website at www.gsi.de/wfa (in German)

The lecture series “Wissenschaft für Alle” is aimed at all persons interested in current science and research. The lectures report on research and developments at GSI and FAIR, but also on current topics from other fields of science and technology. The aim of the series is to prepare and present the scientific processes in a way that is understandable for laypersons in order to make the research accessible to a broad public. The lectures are held by GSI and FAIR staff members or by external speakers from universities and research institutes.(CP)

Current program:
  • Wednesday, 15.09.2021, 2 p. m.
    Die Zahl Pi – der 3(,)14. Vortrag der Reihe Wissenschaft für Alle
    Albrecht Beutelspacher, Director of the Mathematikum Gießen
     
  • Wednesday, 27.10.2021, 2 p. m.
    Die Physik von Star Trek
    Markus Roth, Technical University of Darmstadt
     
  • Wednesday, 17.11.2021, 2 p. m.
    MOSAiC – viele Teile ergeben ein großes Ganzes: Ein Einblick in die größte Arktisexpedition aller Zeiten
    Julia Regnery, Alfred Wegener Institute
     
  • Wednesday, 08.12.2021, 2 p. m.
    Wer strahlte denn da? – Einblick in den wissenschaftlichen Experimentierbetrieb an GSI/FAIR in 2021
    Daniel Severin, GSI/FAIR, et al.
Further information
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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5129 Mon, 30 Aug 2021 11:37:41 +0200 Milestones and Perspectives: Parliamentary State Secretary Dr. Michael Meister and Member of the Bundestag Dr. Astrid Mannes visit GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5129&cHash=f1f4156b79aeb049137957c9c5b51909 The significant progress made in the construction of the FAIR facilities and the current research priorities were the focus of the visit by Dr. Michael Meister, Parliamentary State Secretary to the Federal Minister of Education and Research, and Dr. Astrid Mannes, Member of the Bundestag from Darmstadt. The significant progress made in the construction of the FAIR facilities and the current research priorities were the focus of the visit by Dr. Michael Meister, Parliamentary State Secretary to the Federal Minister of Education and Research, and Dr. Astrid Mannes, Member of the Bundestag from Darmstadt.

The guests were welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director as well as Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Public Relations. Dr. Michael Meister is directly elected Member of the Bundestag for the Bergstraße constituency, Dr. Astrid Mannes is directly elected Member of the Bundestag for the Darmstadt constituency.

First, the guests gained an overview of the 20-hectare construction site from the viewing platform directly adjacent to the construction area. Subsequently, the FAIR construction site was visited at close range during a tour. One highlight was the walk-through of the recently completed underground accelerator tunnel. The central ring accelerator SIS100 will be the heart of the future facility.

The CBM experiment, which is well advanced in construction, was also shown. The unique CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter) experiment is one of the four research pillars of the future FAIR accelerator facility. The focus is on the investigation of highly compressed baryonic matter, as it exists in neutron stars and in the center of supernova explosions.

Efficient construction progress was also noted in the construction field south: this includes the structural work for six buildings and for a further experimental facility - the Superconducting Fragment Separator (Super-FRS). There, the focus is on research topics concerning the nuclear structure and interactions of extremely rare, exotic particles.

State Secretary Meister was impressed by the significant progress made on the construction site in recent years despite pandemic conditions: "I have seen today how a vision is becoming reality in an impressive way. With the ring closure of the accelerator tunnel, a major milestone of the FAIR project has been reached: For this I would like to congratulate all those involved very warmly."

Another important focus of the visit was the high-tech development for FAIR and the very successful current FAIR Phase 0 experiments. The guests were able to gain an insight into the high-tech developments in the test facility for cryogenic magnets, where all superconducting components for the SIS100 accelerator ring are tested for their specifications before being installed in the FAIR facility.

An example of the scientific capabilities at GSI and FAIR is the R3B (Relativistic Radioactive Reaction Experiment) experiment, which was also visited. Within the R3B experiment, which was set up for FAIR in international collaboration, reaction experiments with high-energy exotic nuclei are conducted. Through this, an understanding of the origin of heavy elements can be gained.

"I am particularly impressed by the fact that although FAIR is still in the middle of construction, groundbreaking science is already being carried out here today. Whether it is Covid 19 research with heavy ions or the first experiments at the CRYRING accelerator - FAIR is already making an important contribution to find solutions to major challenges faced by society," says Meister. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5127 Fri, 27 Aug 2021 08:30:00 +0200 Focus on young researchers: Successful interim balance for GET_Involved Program https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5127&cHash=e41383c0e997b9c62b56dd6111bc1726 It is a very successful instrument for the promotion of young scientists: The GET_INvolved Program has attracted numerous young students and early-stage researchers from many nations around the world up to now. By the end of the second quarter of 2021, the program had secured more than 20 bilateral programs focusing on mobility, synergy, and capacity-building for young scientists from partner institutes and associate funding agencies. Recently, the management of GSI and FAIR met with the current participan It is a very successful instrument for the promotion of young scientists: The GET_INvolved Program has attracted numerous young students and early-stage researchers from many nations around the world up to now. By the end of the second quarter of 2021, the program had secured more than 20 bilateral programs focusing on mobility, synergy, and capacity-building for young scientists from partner institutes and associate funding agencies. Recently, the management of GSI and FAIR met with the current participants of the GET_INvolved Program on the campus in Darmstadt.

At a "Meet and Greet", the Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, the Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer and the Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, got into a joint conversation with the international students and researchers from around the world participating in the GET_INvolved Program.

In summary, great progress was made in the last three years: The GET_INvolved Program received around 670 applications through midyear 2021, with approximately 200 of them being accepted into various programs in the program portfolio. Students and researchers from 38 different countries have participated in the GET_INvolved Program, with up to 40 percent of them being female. At the FAIR Phase 0 program, the majority of these students/researchers engaged in and contributed to current experiments. This engagement provided them with real-time, hands-on expertise with an in-depth understanding of the research and development at GSI/FAIR.

The current meeting with GET_Involved participants demonstrates the commitment and support from the joint management for all activities that lead to skilled training of the young generation. The goal is to offer the best research environment for the participants allowing the development of future leaders to operate and exploit the FAIR facility in near future. The Scientific Managing Director Professor Paolo Giubellino emphasized: “FAIR is going to be a world-class facility which will provide forefront technology to researchers from all nations. Thanks to its precursory program FAIR Phase 0 FAIR is a talent factory already now. So join us and GET_INvolved!“ (BP)

About the GET_INvolved Program

The GET_INvolved Program is an umbrella program that includes several bilateral/multi-lateral programs and several frameworks programs with partners and third-party funding agencies. All students and researchers are involved in a dedicated scientific or technical project with a mentor, as a part of their short term internship, bachelor or master thesis, ERASMUS+ Traineeships, sandwich doctoral or a postdoctoral research experience at GSI/FAIR. The duration for these internships vary depending on individual projects and also on the program. The project duration can range from three months for short term internships to up to two years for a research experience as a postdoc.

Further Information

GET_Involved Program for international students and researchers

ERASMUS+ Traineeship

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5123 Wed, 25 Aug 2021 17:00:00 +0200 In the trap: New method for cooling charged particles https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5123&cHash=7800017a3d53f158039b2029a063ebd4 For the first time, physicists have succeeded in successfully realizing a new method for cooling protons using laser-cooled ions - in this case beryllium ions. The innovative feature of the new system is that the two particle types are located in spatially separated traps. This means it is now possible to provide the cooling effect with the help of an electrical resonant circuit over a distance of nine centimeters from one trap to the other. The team at the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenbe This news is based on a press release of the Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

For the first time, physicists have succeeded in successfully realizing a new method for cooling protons using laser-cooled ions - in this case beryllium ions. The innovative feature of the new system is that the two particle types are located in spatially separated traps. This means it is now possible to provide the cooling effect with the help of an electrical resonant circuit over a distance of nine centimeters from one trap to the other. The team at the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), part of the BASE collaboration, was able to demonstrate that protons can be cooled to significantly lower temperatures in one of the traps than would be possible without beryllium.

The new technique can be used for all charged particles, even antiprotons, for which there is no other cooling method in this temperature range. What is particularly exciting is that it should now be possible to conduct experiments in which matter and antimatter can be compared more precisely. The results of the research have been published in the eminent scientific journal Nature. In addition to JGU, the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg (MPIK) and the Japanese Research Center RIKEN, also the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN, the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt and the Leibniz University Hannover were significantly involved in the new development.

In order to be able to make precise measurements of individual ions, they must be captured and stored in a trap in which they are kept as inert as possible. To achieve this state, energy is removed from the charged particles, which reduces their temperature. With the new two-trap structure, the research team was able to reduce the temperature by about a factor of 10 in comparison with that reached using the previous best methods of cooling protons, thus attaining a temperature close to absolute zero. “The lower the temperature of the particle, the more precisely we can restrict the space in which the particle is present inside the trap. And the more accurately we can locate the particle, the better are the starting conditions and consequently also the results of our precision measurements,” explains Dr. Christian Smorra, physicist at the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence and co-author of the publication.

The new two-trap cooling method comes with even more advantages: It can also be used for antimatter particles because in a single-trap cooling system, the matter and antimatter would immediately destroy each other. The new concept will enable more precise comparison of protons and antiprotons. “We want to look specifically for any difference between the properties of protons and antiprotons. Our theory says that the two particles behave identically, the only distinction being the opposed charges. It is still unclear why our universe contains so many protons – and therefore matter – but almost no antiprotons, that is antimatter,” points out Matthew Bohman of MPIK, the first author of the study. Bohman has been working on the development of the new cooling method since 2018, when he was studying for his doctorate.

Whereas previous methods required distances of 0.1 millimeters or less between the particles to be cooled and the beryllium ions, the current research has shown it is in fact possible to transmit the cooling effect despite spatial separation over a distance of nine centimeters. This creates the basis for further research projects – and enables, for example, uninterrupted and more precise frequency measurements, which the BASE collaboration plans to carry out in the case of antimatter in the context of the search for dark matter. The research group had already investigated trapped antiprotons in a single trap during previous experiments at CERN – however, this was done by cooling them with liquid helium and without employing beryllium ions.

The two-trap method was proposed for the first time in 1990. The concept at the time did not include an electric resonant circuit – instead, the ions were to be connected by a common trap electrode. The advantage of this procedure was that no resistance was present, such as that caused by the resonant circuit, which produces heat and impairs the cooling process. The big disadvantage, however, is the low speed at which the energy of the ions is exchanged. As a result, the temperature of the charged particle does not decrease quickly enough. “The current system represents a practically workable development of the concept dating back to 1990. In this case, the energy exchange between the traps occurs within one second rather than taking getting on for two minutes,” stresses Dr. Christian Smorra. (JGU/BP)

Further Information

Scientific publication "Sympathetic cooling of a trapped proton mediated by an LC circuit" in the journal Nature

Press release of the Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5117 Thu, 19 Aug 2021 10:00:00 +0200 Sharing Research Data — GSI and FAIR participate in the establishment of national research data infrastructure https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5117&cHash=e121f7b38a763cb721f5d1e2d5cbaae1 The GSI Helmholtz Centre was a successful co-applicant to fund a consortium of the National Research Data Infrastructure (NFDI). Under this program, a consortium with strong GSI participation will be funded for the next five years. This was announced by the Join Science Conference (GWK) of the German federal and state governments at its meeting in July. The GSI Helmholtz Centre was a successful co-applicant to fund a consortium of the National Research Data Infrastructure (NFDI). Under this program, a consortium with strong GSI participation will be funded for the next five years. This was announced by the Join Science Conference (GWK) of the German federal and state governments at its meeting in July. PUNCH4NFDI (Particles, Universe, NuClei, and Hadrons for the NFDI) is a consortium of particle, astroparticle, hadron, and nuclear physics, and will make research data transparent and permanently available. The Federal Ministry of Education and Research is supporting the project with a contribution of 13.2 million euros. Around one million euros of it will go to GSI and FAIR.

In the coming years, scientific experiments at next-generation research facilities will become increasingly complex, leading to an exponentially growing flood of data. Data rates of up to one TeraByte per second are expected for the experiments at the planned accelerator center FAIR, which is currently being built at GSI. The aim of PUNCH4NFDI is to systematically collect, intelligently link and make accessible this extensive data using novel methods. The organization of the data should follow the principles that it is easy to retrieve, easily accessible, linkable and reusable. An important contribution in this respect will be the development of software and algorithms and the creation of publicly available publications. At the heart of PUNCH4NFDI's activities is the development of a federated "Science Data Platform" that includes all the infrastructures and interfaces necessary for access to and use of data and computing resources. For this purpose, techniques and structures are first created on the basis of representative examples that are suitable for joint data management and address topics such as open data, open science and new ideas for processing and managing extremely large amounts of data.

In addition to GSI, the PUNCH4NFDI consortium includes 19 other funding recipients as well as 22 other partners from the Helmholtz Association, the Max Planck Society, the Leibniz Association and universities. "The coordination and cooperation of all consortium partners is one of the central challenges for the realization of universal research data management. Our activities in this regard focus on the exchange of concepts and developments as well as the provision of services provided to the PUNCH4NFDI partners and the entire NFDI. In a first step, we at GSI/FAIR will develop and provide a PUNCH4NFDI-wide authorization and authentication infrastructure together with Forschungszentrum Jülich. With these tools, we enable central access to all research data of the participating institutions,” explains Kilian Schwarz, Head of the Distributed Computing Group in GSI IT and representative of GSI in the management of PUNCH4NFDI. “In addition, we plan to develop metadata and analysis portals as well as to implement basic infrastructures for federated data management and the use of heterogeneous computing resources. With the sustainable high-performance data center Green IT Cube, we provide the consortium with computing time and storage space for its developments.”

Topics related to research data infrastructures already play a central role in the handling of scientific data from experiments at the GSI/FAIR research facility. Therefore, GSI/FAIR is also active in this field in the European environment, where the realization of a common scientific cloud is also promoted. “With their proficiency and expertise in data storage infrastructures and scientific computing, GSI and FAIR are among the key players in this field. Both GSI and FAIR as ‘ESFRI-Landmark’ are active participants in the consortium ‘European Science Cluster of Astronomy & Particle Physics ESFRI Research Infrastructures’ (ESCAPE), in which we are involved in the development of data infrastructures and analysis platforms as well as the provision of research software and services,” says Arjan Vink, head of the third-party funding office at FAIR/GSI, describing the European initiative. (JL)

Further information:
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5121 Mon, 16 Aug 2021 09:19:38 +0200 Member of the Bundestag Daniela Wagner gets informed at GSI and FAIR about the status of research and construction project https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5121&cHash=d149872cb18f533ccac1195c99817e7c The member of the Bundestag Daniela Wagner (Bündnis 90/Die Grünen) recently informed herself about the scientific activities at GSI/FAIR and the progress of the future accelerator center FAIR, which is currently being built at GSI. During the information visit as part of her summer tour, Daniela Wagner was accompanied by Nina Eisenhardt, member of the Hessian parliament, and Andreas Ewald, chairperson of the Darmstadt city council fraction (both Bündnis90/Die Grünen). The member of the Bundestag Daniela Wagner (Bündnis 90/Die Grünen) recently informed herself about the scientific activities at GSI/FAIR and the progress of the future accelerator center FAIR, which is currently being built at GSI. During the information visit as part of her summer tour, Daniela Wagner was accompanied by Nina Eisenhardt, member of the Hessian parliament, and Andreas Ewald, chairperson of the Darmstadt city council fraction (both Bündnis90/Die Grünen).

The guests were welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Haik Simon, Deputy Spokesperson of FAIR Experiment R3B/Project Leader Super-FRS, and Berit Paflik from the Press and Public Relations Department at GSI and FAIR.

The program included an overview of the current research topics and the strategic goals for FAIR and GSI, which are the basis of the site's activities. Central issues were the successful experimental program in 2021, part of “FAIR Phase 0”, the campus development within the framework of the master plan, and the progress in the procurement of FAIR components and on the 20-hectare construction field in the east of the existing GSI and FAIR campus.

During a guided tour, the guests were first able to gain insights into the research facilities on campus. The experiment R3B was visited as well as the therapy unit for tumor treatment using carbon ions and the linear accelerator UNILAC. The test facility for superconducting accelerator magnets, where mainly high-tech components for FAIR are tested, was also visited.

After this, Daniela Wagner, Nina Eisenhardt and Andreas Ewald had the opportunity to get an overview of the entire construction site and the activities in the northern and southern construction areas from the viewing platform on the edge of the construction site, before taking a tour of the site to get a close-up view of the construction progress. The agenda also included a walk-through of the recently completed underground accelerator tunnel. The central ring accelerator SIS100 will be the heart of the future facility. The ring closure marks an important milestone in the realization process of the entire FAIR project. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5119 Wed, 11 Aug 2021 09:00:00 +0200 Canadian research organization Mitacs and GSI formalize partnership https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5119&cHash=e21146ccaa3e7af3f6e1b0d5ff27742e A new agreement strengthens international research collaborations by creating exchange opportunities for PhD students and postdoctoral fellows: The nonprofit Canadian research organization Mitacs and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung are delighted to launch a formal partnership to support German and Canadian doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows at host-country research institutions. GSI becomes the third Helmholtz center after Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ) and Karlsruhe Institute of A new agreement strengthens international research collaborations by creating exchange opportunities for PhD students and postdoctoral fellows: The nonprofit Canadian research organization Mitacs and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung are delighted to launch a formal partnership to support German and Canadian doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows at host-country research institutions. GSI becomes the third Helmholtz center after Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ) and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) to partner with Mitacs.

The Mitacs-GSI exchange mobility program will boost existing partnerships and help build future scientists and leaders for the operation of science facilities like the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR, which is currently being built at the GSI. GSI has been cooperating with and benefiting from scientific and technical collaboration with Canadian institutions for years in several research projects. The organization also has a special relation with the Canadian accelerator facility TRIUMF. The new partnership is remarkable also because it is formalized in the year of the 50th anniversary of the German-Canadian science and technology cooperation. Valuable in assisting in the recruitment of high-caliber qualified PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, the initiative aims to strengthen research collaborations between both countries.

Participants will receive a grant of $6,000 through the Globalink Research Award program to advance projects for 12 to 24 weeks under the supervision of a faculty member in the host institute. Mitacs and GSI’s three-year agreement will support a total of up to 36 researchers — six Canadian students and fellows per year going to GSI Germany and six coming to Canada from Germany.

 Professor Dr. Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing director of GSI and FAIR said: “It brings me great satisfaction to see Mitacs and GSI team up to promote and support early-stage researchers to gain access to world-class facilities and cooperate in collaborative research in basic science, frontend technologies, and applications. GSI is eager to support young PhD students and postdoctoral fellows in Canada and Germany collaborate on research projects. International partnerships are essential to us because they enhance research quality and promote additional knowledge networks. The partnership with Mitacs is now a great example of our successful and productive collaboration with Canadian institutions.”

Dr. John Hepburn, CEO and Scientific Director, Mitacs, said: “I am delighted to sign Mitacs’s first agreement with the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research — an important step to expand our already strong connections with the German research and innovation ecosystem. We are proud to offer opportunities for PhD students and postdoctoral fellows to develop skills and expand their professional networks, while deepening collaborations that will drive outcomes for Canada and Germany.”

Further information

The details about the application process for researchers interested in the Mitacs-GSI collaboration will be released in the near future. More information about the Globalink Research Award can be found on the program’s pages on the Mitacs and GSI/FAIR websites. For immediate questions can be contacted Étienne Pineault, Director, International Business Development, Mitacs at  epineault(at)mitacs.ca or Dr. Pradeep Ghosh, Programme Manager, GSI at Pr.Ghosh(at)gsi.de.

About Mitacs

Mitacs is a not-for-profit organization that fosters growth and innovation in Canada by solving business challenges with research solutions from academic institutions. Mitacs is funded by the Government of Canada along with the Government of Alberta, the Government of British Columbia, Research Manitoba, the Government of New Brunswick, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, the Government of Nova Scotia, the Government of Ontario, Innovation PEI, the Government of Quebec, the Government of Saskatchewan, and the Government of Yukon.

About GSI/FAIR

GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt operates a worldwide leading accelerator facility for research purposes. About 1,520 employees are working at GSI. In addition, every year approximately 1,000 researchers from universities and other research institutes around the world come to GSI. They use the facility for experiments to gain new insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe. They also develop new applications in medicine and technology. GSI is a limited liability company (GmbH). Shareholders are the German Federal Government with 90 %, the State of Hesse with 8 %, the State of Rhineland-Palatinate and the Free State of Thuringia with 1 % each. GSI is a member of the Helmholtz Association, Germany's largest research organization. At GSI, FAIR is currently being built, an international accelerator facility for the research with antiprotons and ions which is being developed and constructed in cooperation with international partners. It is one of the world’s largest construction projects for international cutting-edge research. The FAIR project was initiated by the scientific community and researchers of GSI. The GSI accelerators will become part of the future FAIR facility and serve as the first acceleration stage.

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5115 Thu, 05 Aug 2021 10:26:57 +0200 Hessian Minister of Finance Michael Boddenberg informs himself at GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5115&cHash=eacc2aa6ca6b4ba46739d412acef1ca9 The Hessian Minister of Finance, Michael Boddenberg, recently visited GSI and FAIR. The progress and developments of the FAIR project were the focus of the meeting. He was welcomed by Dr. Ulrich Breuer, the Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, the Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, as well as Jutta Leroudier from the Press and Public Relations department of GSI and FAIR. Achim Baumbach, Deputy Head of department at the Ministry of Finance, and Moritz Josten, deputy pre The Hessian Minister of Finance, Michael Boddenberg, recently visited GSI and FAIR. The progress and developments of the FAIR project were the focus of the meeting. He was welcomed by Dr. Ulrich Breuer, the Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, the Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, as well as Jutta Leroudier from the Press and Public Relations department of GSI and FAIR. Achim Baumbach, Deputy Head of department at the Ministry of Finance, and Moritz Josten, deputy press spokesman at the Ministry of Finance accompanied the minister.

In an introduction, the minister gained insights into current topics and activities at GSI and FAIR. He learned about the research program "FAIR-Phase 0", the perspectives of campus development, the substantial modernizations of the existing facility and the current status of the realization of the FAIR construction project, one of the largest projects for cutting-edge research worldwide.

After visiting the testing hall, where new hightech components for FAIR can be assembled and tested, Michael Boddenberg got an overview of the entire 20-hectare construction area from the viewing platform. Then he took a close view at the progress on the FAIR construction site during a tour. This included a walk-through of the recently completed shell construction of the underground accelerator tunnel. The central ring accelerator SIS100 will be the heart of the future facility. There was also an opportunity to visit the central transfer building, the crucial hub for the facility’s beamline, which is currently being built over several floors. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5113 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 09:34:11 +0200 Member of the Hessian parliament Hildegard Förster-Heldmann from Darmstadt on a visit at GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5113&cHash=2fb64268457e82b403a7e73eacc58f67 Hildegard Förster-Heldmann, member of the Hessian parliament, deputy chairperson of the parliamentary group of Bündnis 90/Die Grünen Hessen and chairperson of the city council fraction in Darmstadt, recently visited GSI and FAIR. Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR as well as Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Press and Public Relations of GSI and FAIR, welcomed her. The politician was accompanied by Oliver Stienen, parliam Hildegard Förster-Heldmann, member of the Hessian parliament, deputy chairperson of the parliamentary group of Bündnis 90/Die Grünen Hessen and chairperson of the city council fraction in Darmstadt, recently visited GSI and FAIR. Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR as well as Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Press and Public Relations of GSI and FAIR, welcomed her. The politician was accompanied by Oliver Stienen, Parliamentary group Managing Director of Bündnis 90/Die Grünen in Darmstadt and Judith Schreck from Public Relations.

After introductory information on the status of the FAIR construction project, the campus development, previous research successes and current experiments, the guests were given insights into the existing research facilities on the GSI and FAIR campus during a guided tour. The tour included the linear accelerator UNILAC, the therapy unit for tumor treatment using carbon ions, the large detector HADES, the R3B experiment for exotic nuclei and the test facility for superconducting accelerator magnets, where high-tech components for FAIR are tested.

Afterwards Hildegard Förster-Heldmann was able to take a look at the progress of the construction of the future FAIR accelerator center from the viewing platform on the FAIR construction site, from the completion of the structural work for the SIS100 accelerator ring tunnel to the central transfer building, which is being erected over several floors. In addition, foundations and walls for the first experiment have already been built. The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is one of the four research pillars of the FAIR accelerator facility, one of the largest construction projects for cutting-edge research worldwide. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5111 Fri, 30 Jul 2021 09:00:00 +0200 Hessian chairperson of the CDU parliamentary group Ines Claus visits GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5111&cHash=d4013f132f4596dc530b9fc8cc39d198 The progress of the FAIR project, the current scientific activities and the campus development were central topics during the visit of the chairperson of the CDU parliamentary group in the Hessian state parliament, Ines Claus, at GSI and FAIR. The politician from Groß-Gerau was welcomed by Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing director of GSI and FAIR as well as Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Press and Public Relations of GSI and FAIR. She was accompanied on the appointment, which was part of her summer tour under the theme "Innovative, digital, sustainable" by Office Manager Ingo Schon, Marius Schmitt and Scarlett Rüger (both Public Relations Department).

The politician informed herself about the status of the FAIR construction project, which is one of the largest cutting-edge research projects worldwide, and about previous research successes and the current experiments. After an introductory presentation, Ines Claus was able to gain insights into the existing accelerator and research facilities during a tour of the GSI and FAIR campus. She visited the linear accelerator UNILAC, the therapy unit for tumor treatment using carbon ions, the large detector HADES and the R3B experiment for exotic nuclei.

On the viewpoint of the FAIR construction site Ines Claus could get an overview of the construction measures and the current status of the work on the 20-hectare construction site. The FAIR project is progressing very well, including the completion of the structural work for the SIS100 accelerator ring tunnel, the heart of the facility, and the structural engineering for the central transfer building, the central hub for the facility’s beamline. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5102 Wed, 28 Jul 2021 08:30:00 +0200 Film award for FAIR drone video https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5102&cHash=da66894ea24f1f1a43e24dc7b941182e The "Longterm Dronelapse 2018-2020" with which GSI/FAIR document the progress on the FAIR construction site was awarded the "Intermedia-globe SILVER Award" by the World Media Festival. 811 entries from 41 nations were submitted to this film competition. The "Longterm Dronelapse 2018-2020" with which GSI/FAIR document the progress on the FAIR construction site was awarded the "Intermedia-globe SILVER Award" by the World Media Festival. 811 entries from 41 nations were submitted to this film competition.

Using a sophisticated filming technique that is not yet widely used, GSI/FAIR have been creating annual longterm time-lapse videos since 2018 to show developments at the construction site of the FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) particle accelerator facility. The jury of the "WorldMediaFestival | Television & Corporate Media Awards" judged the video to be an outstanding contribution in the category "Public Relations/Research and Science" and awarded it the "Intermedia-globe SILVER Award". 

With the new technique of "Longterm Dronelapse", the progress on one of the largest construction sites for fundamental research in the world becomes particularly tangible. For this purpose, Lars Möller from the interdisciplinary media production "Zeitrausch" from Breuberg regularly flies the same routes over the FAIR construction site with a drone. Several moving time-lapse videos are then combined into a single video. In the World Media Festival award-winning video, drone movies recorded over three years, are superimposed thanks to GPS support, so that the progress of the construction activities can be experienced in an impressive way.

The WorldMediaFestivals are located in Hamburg, Germany, and are an initiative by intermedia. According to their official website the WorldMediaFestivals | Television & Corporate Media Awards honor excellence in Television, Corporate Film, Online and Print productions on an international scale. These Awards are acknowledged internationally as symbols of the highest production standards and are one of the world's highest honors in visual competition. Experienced professionals from around the world serve in a volunteer capacity as judges. Decisions are based on both creativity and effectiveness. The criteria they use include for example writing, sound, editing, visuals, insights, and above all the extent to which the entry meets its stated goals, i.e. how well the defined target group is being addressed. (LW)

More information

Award-winning drone video longterm dronelapse

List of award-winning entries World Media Festival

 

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5106 Fri, 23 Jul 2021 08:53:00 +0200 Hessian Member of the State Parliament Katy Walther Visits GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5106&cHash=d4f569dd2ea19473b1c0123f1f3d0853 The energy-efficient supercomputing center Green IT Cube was the focus of the visit of Katy Walther, member of the Hessian parliament. She was accompanied by members of the county council of the administrative district Offenbach. The energy-efficient supercomputing center Green IT Cube was the focus of the visit of Katy Walther, member of the Hessian parliament. She was accompanied by members of the county council of the administrative district Offenbach.

The MP's visit was focused on sustainable, energy-efficient and high-performance IT infrastructure. Katy Walther from Bündnis 90/Die Grünen is responsible for the administrative district Offenbach and was accompanied by the members of the parliamentary group Olaf Hermann, managing director of county council group, the environmental policy spokesman René Bacher, the cultural policy spokesman Werner Kremeier, the office manager Corina Retzbach, Büroleiterin as well as the members of the county council Sonja Arnold, Christine Dammer and Karin Wagner.

The guests were welcomed by Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR. In addition, Dr. Helmut Kreiser, Group Manager of the IT Department DataCenter, and Dr. Ingo Peter, Head of Press and Public Relations, were among the participants of GSI and FAIR.

The guests took the opportunity to learn more about the high-performance data center and its infrastructure in presentations and during a guided tour through the Green IT Cube, and showed great interest in the promising perspectives. The Green IT Cube on the GSI/FAIR campus is one of the most capable scientific computing centers in the world. At the same time, it sets standards in IT technology and energy saving: Thanks to a special cooling system, it is particularly energy- and cost-efficient. Therefore, the energy required for cooling is less than seven percent of the electrical power used for computing. In conventional data centers with air cooling, this relation amounts to 30 up to 100 percent. The innovative cooling system also enables a compact and space-saving design. The Green IT Cube has already received numerous awards, including the Blue Angel, the eco label of the German government.

In addition to a tour of the Green IT Cube, the program included an overview of FAIR/GSI research topics and the current status of the FAIR construction project. Furthermore, the guests were able to take a look at the 20-hectare FAIR construction site with the completed structural work for the ring tunnel of the SIS100 from the viewpoint. (JL)

Further information
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Aktuelles
news-5104 Tue, 20 Jul 2021 07:27:00 +0200 Federal Ministry of Education and Research to fund fundamental research on detectors with almost three million euros https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5104&cHash=86d1302d7ac3dec09eba6febea269b80 Within the framework of the project funding of the ErUM-Pro action plan of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the Institute of Nuclear Physics at the University of Cologne will receive a total of 2.8 million euros for the next three years. This funding will be used to support the projects of Professor Dr. Jan Jolie, Professor Dr. Peter Reiter and Professor Dr. Andreas Zilges, which address the investigation of the smallest structures of matter. This news is based on a press release of the University of Cologne

Within the framework of the project funding of the ErUM-Pro action plan of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the Institute of Nuclear Physics at the University of Cologne will receive a total of 2.8 million euros for the next three years. This funding will be used to support the projects of Professor Dr. Jan Jolie, Professor Dr. Peter Reiter and Professor Dr. Andreas Zilges, which address the investigation of the smallest structures of matter. The focus is on the development, setup and execution of experiments at the international research facility FAIR, which is currently under construction at GSI, and the research facility ISOLDE at the research center CERN near Geneva.

The aim of the investigations is the properties of short-lived, previously unknown atomic nuclei, which are made available for the experiments at the accelerators in Darmstadt and in Geneva. In this context, the Cologne groups contribute significantly to the instrumentation of future experiments with detectors for γ-spectroscopy, for the detection of neutrons, and for beam particles. The experiments with stable beams performed at the accelerator facility of the University of Cologne will thus be extended in an ideal way.

The Cologne collaboration with the European research facility ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure — Nuclear Physics) will also be strengthened. ELI-NP is being built near Bucharest, Romania. The unique combination of laser beams and electron beams from particle accelerators will enable a future light source characterized by extremely high intensities and extremely high energies.

99.9% of the visible matter around us consists of atomic nuclei. These consist of protons and neutrons, which interact with each other through the strong as well as the electromagnetic and the weak force. Despite intensive experimental and theoretical efforts, the strong interaction in nuclei is still not well understood. Atomic nuclei also play a central role in energy production and other processes in stars. This means that atomic nuclei have an important connecting role between the very smallest systems and the very largest systems (stars, galaxies, universe). Because of this unique position of the many-particle system atomic nucleus, it is of fundamental importance to understand the structure of nuclei and the interactions of nucleons in nuclei.

With the ErUM-Pro action plan, the BMBF promotes networking between universities, research infrastructures and society in order to further develop research infrastructures and enrich research there. The action plan is part of the BMBF framework program ErUM - Exploring Universe and Matter. (CP)

Further information:
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5100 Thu, 15 Jul 2021 08:38:00 +0200 High gloss future — Testing of first of series module for the UNILAC Alvarez upgrade https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5100&cHash=4ab100ebdf9e7329b29973807af99575 Highest quality and a mirror-like gloss: Inside the so-called Alvarez accelerator, a 55-meter-long part of GSI's linear accelerator UNILAC, the high-grade copper surface stands out. Due to the upgrading measures for operation with the new FAIR accelerator facility, which is currently under construction, the existing GSI facility is also undergoing many improvements. Highest quality and a mirror-like gloss: Inside the so-called Alvarez accelerator, a 55-meter-long part of GSI's linear accelerator UNILAC, the high-grade copper surface stands out. Due to the upgrading measures for operation with the new FAIR accelerator facility, which is currently under construction, the existing GSI facility is also undergoing many improvements. One of them is the replacement of the existing Alvarez with a new, improved accelerator structures of the Alvarez type. A first of series (FoS) module has now been completed and is undergoing testing.

The linear accelerator UNILAC (Universal Linear Accelerator) serves as the first accelerator stage to bring ions up to speed. The Alvarez section, located at the rear of the 120-meter-long UNILAC, brings them from 5% to 15% of the speed of light so they can be injected into the GSI ring accelerator, accelerated further and later transferred into the FAIR facility. Since the existing Alvarez, which is in operation for nearly 50 years, doesn’t meet FAIR's high requirements, the decision for its replacement was made.

The new components combine large dimensions in the meter range with high precision in the submillimeter range. Internal surfaces must be manufactured to the highest quality with roughness of just a few micrometers to apply the copper plating afterwards. For the GSI electroplating department, which specializes in large components, the copper plating itself is a huge challenge due to the necessary homogeneity. The special surface is necessary for the device to start its “glossy” future in the accelerator.

“Another specialty are the quadrupole magnets integrated into the structure's drift tubes, which provide beam focusing during acceleration. Manufacturing, installation and adjustment must be exactly right to guarantee the magnetic field quality,” explains accelerator physicist Dr. Lars Groening, who is head of the responsible department “UNILAC Post Stripper Upgrade”. “We have greatly improved the quadrupoles compared to the existing Alvarez: they focus more strongly and, in quasi-simultaneous operation with several ion species, ensure optimal focusing properties for each species through rapid switching. This is essential for FAIR.”

Many of GSI/FAIR’s technical departments are involved in this project. Following extensive planning, design and construction of the components took place. A FoS Alvarez component was delivered in 2019 and assembled on campus. Testing took place for specified properties such as dimensions, tolerances and surface quality of the inside, as well as low-power electromagnetic field characteristics. In the previous year 2020 the structure received its characteristic high gloss: it was successfully copper-plated at GSI's electroplating facility and is now ready for testing in high-power operation.

Once the FoS passes all tests, 25 sections will be manufactured in series production. They, too, must undergo a defined acceptance procedure and tests of the high-frequency electromagnetic fields. For this purpose, five sections with three-ton end caps at each side and the drift tubes will be assembled to one cavity, so that in total five cavities of the Alvarez type will be tested. Subsequent to the careful test campaign, the replacement of the existing Alvarez section with the five new Alvarez cavities can begin at the UNILAC tunnel, which is estimated to take about one and a half years. (CP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5098 Tue, 13 Jul 2021 08:42:00 +0200 FAIR construction project wins Solid Bautechpreis 2021 — Main prize for executing construction company PORR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5098&cHash=8b58cfb4d08d1954b50394c46c14d212 In June, the construction company PORR, responsible for civil engineering in the FAIR Construction Site North, won the Austrian Solid Bautechpreis 2021 in the category "International". The prizes are awarded every two years as main prizes and recognitions for outstanding construction achievements of Austrian companies by the construction magazine SOLID. A top-class jury of experts honors construction projects in various categories. In June, the construction company PORR, responsible for civil engineering in the FAIR Construction Site North, won the Austrian Solid Bautechpreis 2021 in the category "International". The prizes are awarded every two years as main prizes and recognitions for outstanding construction achievements of Austrian companies by the construction magazine SOLID. A top-class jury of experts honors construction projects in various categories. This year, the awards gala, where the winners were ceremoniously announced, took place virtually.

Since 2018, PORR has been realizing one of the currently largest and most complex construction projects in international cutting-edge research as part of the ARGE FAIR Construction Site North: PORR is building the 1.1 km long FAIR accelerator tunnel including the building sections above, the transfer building with underground section for guiding the beam into the accelerator ring (SIS100) and the connected main supply building. (CP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5086 Thu, 08 Jul 2021 10:00:00 +0200 Series production and series tests of SIS100 dipoles for the FAIR ring accelerator are completed https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5086&cHash=5c60b74340d37e50df54c1768652f7fc Another decisive step has been taken on the way to completion of the large ring accelerator SIS100, the heart of the future accelerator center FAIR: The production of all 110 superconducting dipole magnets for the new heavy ion accelerator with a circumference of 1.1 kilometers has been completed, as have the corresponding cold tests at the final operating temperature of -269 degrees. Another decisive step has been taken on the way to completion of the large ring accelerator SIS100, the heart of the future accelerator center FAIR: The production of all 110 superconducting dipole magnets for the new heavy ion accelerator with a circumference of 1.1 kilometers has been completed, as have the corresponding cold tests at the final operating temperature of -269 degrees.

In the FAIR ring accelerator, various sophisticated magnets and entire magnet systems will ensure that the ion beam is precisely guided and focused. The superconducting dipole modules also belong to them. In total 110 dipole magnets were produced, 108 will be installed in the ring accelerator tunnel and two more are spare ones. The dipoles, that will mainly be needed for deflecting the particle beam, make up more than a quarter of all 415 fast ramped superconducting magnets utilized in the SIS100.

The successful production of these dipole modules and their testing represents the largest series of accelerator components ever manufactured by order of GSI. The completion is an important milestone on the way to installation in the tunnel, which is scheduled to begin in the second half of next year. Bilfinger Noell in Würzburg, one of the few European manufacturers of superconducting magnets, was contracted for series production.

The SIS100 dipole magnets are so-called superferric magnets, consisting of a superconducting coil and an iron yoke to guide the magnetic field. The particular feature of the magnets is the superconducting coil, in which a special superconducting cable is used. This nuclotron cable - originally developed for the ring accelerator Nuklotron at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia - is particularly suitable for generating rapidly ramped magnetic fields.

The cable consists of a copper-nickel tube. Around this tube strands of niobium-titanium, a common superconductor, are coiled. The original design was optimized with regard to the requirements of FAIR. It is cooled with liquid helium and operated at a temperature of 4.5 Kelvin (equivalent to 4.5 degrees Celsius above absolute zero at around -273 degrees). The design of the magnets allows to integrate vacuum chambers for the ion beam, whose wall temperature is also just above absolute zero. Thus, the chamber walls act like a super pump onto which the remaining particles of the beam vacuum keep attached. The extremely low remaining gas pressure made possible by is a mandatory precondition for the acceleration of heavy ion beams with highest intensities. Highest particle intensities are part of the specifications of the FAIR facility, which offers a wide variety of new experimental possibilities.

Each of the magnets, which weight about three tons and are three meter long, is subjected to a comprehensive test program: The quality control of the production as well as several tests under room temperature conditions are performed in Würzburg before shipment to Darmstadt. Among other things, the geometric precision of the inner aperture and the electrical properties of the coil were measured as part of the so-called FAT (Factory Acceptance Test). Bilfinger Noell succeeded in making the production so precise over the entire series that the deviations of the geometry of the field-determining pole shoes were always less than 50 micrometers from the nominal geometry.

After delivery to GSI, all 110 dipole modules were subjected to a SAT (Site Acceptance Test), which included performance tests at the final operating temperature of 4.5 K. To cool the magnets down to this temperature, GSI has built an elaborate, almost 700-square-meter test facility with cryogenic equipment for superconducting accelerator magnets (STF, Series Test Facility). It has four so-called feed boxes to connect the dipole modules for parallel testing in different phases. Using a specially procured high-power power supply unit, the modules could be supplied during the performance test with amperage up to 17 kiloamperes at rise rates of 28000 amperes per second.

The test program for all 110 dipole modules was carried out in years of cooperation by employees from various specialist areas and departments. In a final integration step, the thin-walled dipole chambers, produced by PINK Vakuumtechnik in Wertheim, are now being installed. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5096 Tue, 06 Jul 2021 07:11:00 +0200 Diversity Charter signed: GSI/FAIR promotes diversity https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5096&cHash=da1b4a28355bcc140cbae026b99157bf GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH) have signed the "Diversity Charter". Thereby, GSI/FAIR is committed to an organizational culture of diversity that is free of prejudice. GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH) have signed the "Diversity Charter". Thereby, GSI/FAIR is committed to an organizational culture of diversity that is free of prejudice. The implementation of the "Diversity Charter" aims to create and promote an appreciative work environment for all employees, "irrespective of age, ethnic background and nationality, gender and gender identity, physical and mental abilities, religion and worldview, sexual orientation and social background," the charter declares. The charter was signed by the three managing directors of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, Dr. Ulrich Breuer and Jörg Blaurock.

The "Diversity Charter" is the result of a corporate initiative to promote diversity in companies and public institutions. The German government supports this initiative, which operates under the aegis of German Chancellor Angela Merkel. More than 3,800 companies and institutions with about 14 million employees have signed the “Diversity Charter”.

The initiative has been supported by the non-profit association “Charta der Vielfalt e.V”. since 2010. Its goal is to promote the recognition, appreciation and inclusion of diversity in corporate culture in Germany. With various projects, the “Diversity Charter” continues to advance the discussion on diversity management in Germany.

Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR emphasizes: "For GSI/FAIR as a strongly internationally operating research institution, the cooperation with different people and cultures has long been part of everyday life. Cutting-edge research is based on lively collaborations across all borders, not only across state borders. An unprejudiced perspective that optimally promotes the diverse talents is of great importance for successful top-level science.

Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR stresses: "The diversity of our employees with all their different skills and talents opens up a potential that we do not want to relinquish and cannot relinquish. Diversity is also an economic factor of success. It generates opportunities to meet the demands of modern business and working life even more successfully and efficiently, especially in an open-minded institution like GSI/FAIR."

Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR underlines: "Appreciation and recognition of diversity are an important resource that paves the way for innovative solutions. New perspectives and constructive cooperation make it possible to meet the challenges of increasing globalization. This capacity for innovation, which emerges from an organizational culture of diversity, must be harnessed to shape and advance promising future-oriented projects as FAIR."

Already last year, the centers of the Helmholtz Association agreed to develop and live a common understanding of diversity, inclusion and a diversity-aware organizational culture. All 19 members of the Helmholtz Association, among them also GSI, have officially adopted a corresponding guideline in their assembly of members in order to create the framework conditions for reflecting diversity and inclusion in the processes, structures and conditions of the centers. Now, with the signing of the "Diversity Charter", it was underlined how important it is for GSI/FAIR to have a climate of acceptance and mutual trust. (BP)

Further information
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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5092 Thu, 01 Jul 2021 08:15:00 +0200 ALICE finds that charm hadronization differs https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5092&cHash=32526c587f24049d6231494ef5895c81 New measurements by the ALICE collaboration show that the way charm quarks form hadrons in proton-proton collisions differs significantly from expectations based on electron collider measurements. The ALICE research department at GSI was substantially involved in the measurement and evaluation of the results. This text is based on a news by the European research organisation CERN

New measurements by the ALICE collaboration show that the way charm quarks form hadrons in proton-proton collisions differs significantly from expectations based on electron collider measurements. The ALICE research department at GSI was substantially involved in the measurement and evaluation of the results.

Quarks are among the elementary particles of the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Besides up and down quarks, which are the basic building blocks of ordinary matter in the Universe, four other quark flavors exist and are also abundantly produced in collisions at particle accelerators like the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Quarks are not observed in isolation due to a fundamental aspect of the strong interaction, known as color charge confinement. Confinement requires particles that carry the charge of the strong interaction, called color, to form states that are color-neutral. This in turn forces quarks to undergo a process of hadronization, i.e. to form hadrons, which are composite particles mostly made of a quark and an antiquark (mesons) or of three quarks (baryons). The only exception is the heaviest quark, the top, which decays before it has time to hadronize.

At particle accelerators, quarks with a large mass, such as the charm quark, are produced only in the initial interactions between the colliding particles. Depending on the type of beam used, these can be electron-positron, electron-proton or proton-proton collisions (as at the LHC). The subsequent hadronization of charm quarks into mesons (D0, D+, Ds) or baryons (Λc, Ξc, …) occurs on a long space-time scale and was considered to be universal - that is, independent of the species of the colliding particles - until the recent findings by the ALICE collaboration.

The large data samples collected during Run 2 of the LHC allowed ALICE to count the vast majority of charm quarks produced in the proton-proton collisions by reconstructing the decays of all charm meson species and of the most abundant charm baryons (Λc and Ξc). The charm quarks were found to form baryons almost 40% of the time, which is four times more often than what was expected based on measurements previously made at colliders with electron beams (e+e- and ep in the figure below).

“Coordinated by Dr. Andrea Dubla, our local ALICE group at GSI has produced and published many of these results. This also involved the use of a software framework for decay reconstruction developed for the FAIR experiment for studies of compressed nuclear matter CBM and now shared between CBM and ALICE,” explains Professor Silvia Masciocchi, head of the ALICE department at GSI. “The study of heavy quarks is one of the main focuses of our ALICE research at GSI, and we are very pleased that our long-standing efforts have now contributed to such impressive results. Our research also profits strongly from the postdoctoral research fellowship program HGF-GSI-OCPC, which allows us to attract and recruit excellent researchers from universities in China. This opens up exciting perspectives for the future.”

The measurements show that the process of color-charge confinement and hadron formation is still a poorly understood aspect of the strong interaction. Current theoretical explanations of baryon enhancement include the combination of multiple quarks produced in proton-proton collisions and new mechanisms in the neutralisation of the color charge. Additional measurements during the next run of the LHC will allow these theories to be scrutinized and further our knowledge of the strong interaction. (CERN/CP)

Further information
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5088 Tue, 29 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0200 ESA-FAIR cooperation: Dr. Dr. Jennifer Ngo-Anh succeeds Thomas Reiter https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5088&cHash=7163eb2fe0511f2f5e599e591a5e2ab6 In the joint cooperation between the European Space Agency ESA and the international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research GmbH), which is currently being built at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, there is a new ESA coordinator responsible for implementing the ESA-FAIR cooperation. Jennifer Ngo-Anh, who holds doctorates in medicine and neuroscience, succeeds astronaut Thomas Reiter, who recently retired. On FAIR side, Dr. Corinna Kausch from Biophy In the joint cooperation between the European Space Agency ESA and the international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research GmbH), which is currently being built at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, there is a new ESA coordinator responsible for implementing the ESA-FAIR cooperation. Jennifer Ngo-Anh, who holds doctorates in medicine and neuroscience, succeeds astronaut Thomas Reiter, who recently retired. On FAIR side, Dr. Corinna Kausch from Biophysics Department is responsible for implementing the cooperation.

Dr. Dr. Jennifer Ngo-Anh works as Research and Payloads Coordinator in the Directorate of Human and Robotic Exploration programs. There she coordinate the research and payloads program, which has the overarching goal to enable safe and sustainable long-duration exploration missions into Deep Space with human crews. In her field of responsibility, she will also be in charge of the ESA-FAIR cooperation on cosmic radiation research, in which she has already been significantly involved before, among other things as part of the project team in the implementation of the joint ESA-FAIR Summer School.

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR Professor Paolo Giubellino said: “GSI and FAIR sincerely thank Thomas Reiter for the excellent collaboration. He was one of the decisive initiators of the ESA-FAIR cooperation, which we were able to successfully launch with the signing of the contract in February 2018 and which has already generated numerous important research contributions. We are very much looking forward to working with Dr. Dr. Ngo-Anh in the future and the opportunity to further advance our collaboration together with her. The cooperation between FAIR and ESA opens up unique opportunities for excellent research in the field of cosmic radiation and its effects.”

One of the key questions that need to be addressed regarding the future of human spaceflight as well as robotic exploration programs is how cosmic radiation affects human beings, electronics, and materials. Another important component is the assessment of radiation risks. More precise research on cosmic radiation, undertaken by the ESA-FAIR cooperation, is thus one of the central tasks for the effective protection of astronauts and space systems.

The new ESA person responsible, Dr. Dr. Ngo-Anh, is also looking forward to a strengthened collaboration with GSI/FAIR and emphasizes the importance of it: “Space radiation is considered as being one of the potential showstoppers for long-duration human exploration missions into Deep Space. This is why we have the cooperation with GSI / FAIR in place through which we are trying to advance our space radiation understanding. The cooperation is unique, because in the area of space radiation research, very limited opportunities for exposing materials to (space) irradiation is available. One of the main objectives of the cooperation is to implement space-relevant experiments and directly apply the obtained knowledge at the state-of-the-art facilities and infrastructure of GSI and FAIR in Darmstadt – and thereby contribute to sustained and safe exploration of Deep Space with human crews”.

Dr. Dr. Jennifer Ngo-Anh studied medicine in Tübingen and received her doctorate there, followed by neuroscience studies with a PhD at the University of Portland in the US state of Oregon. Subsequently, she began her career at ESA in the Directorate for Astronautical Spaceflight. Today, as Program Coordinator Research and Payloads, she leads the mainly medical/life science aspects of the European space program with a team of 20 people. Her scope of activities includes the scientific planning, coordination and implementation of the European contribution to the International Space Station (ISS) as well as all European ground-based human and robotic space activities. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-5090 Thu, 24 Jun 2021 07:46:00 +0200 TRON uses GSI/FAIR experiment period for cancer research: combination of heavy ion therapy and mRNA vaccine https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5090&cHash=fad569a3a2dd40de6e43fcdfbe217e5a It is a strong alliance for research in the fight against cancer, opening the way for exciting new developments. On one hand, the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt with its worldwide unique accelerator facilities and the cancer therapy with ion beams developed here. On the other hand, the biopharmaceutical and translational research institute TRON in Mainz with its highly specialized oncology research. It is a strong alliance for research in the fight against cancer, opening the way for exciting new developments. On one hand, the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt with its worldwide unique accelerator facilities and the cancer therapy with ion beams developed here. On the other hand, the biopharmaceutical and translational research institute TRON in Mainz with its highly specialized oncology research. Via its founder Professor Ugur Sahin and further scientists, TRON is closely linked to the biotechnology company BioNTech, which is conducting world-class science with its Corona vaccine development – based on the most advanced applications of mRNA vaccines from tumor research.

In the ongoing experiment period on the GSI and FAIR campus, TRON, in collaboration with the GSI Department of Biophysics, is using the accelerator facilities for a new and promising combination of therapeutic approaches: combining carbon ion therapy and immunotherapy with an mRNA-based cancer vaccine. Combining this powerful systemic drug with localized heavy ion bombardment of the primary mass could be a key to defeat cancers in advanced stage.

TRON's research at GSI/FAIR is still a glance into the future. “The findings will give a first orientation if heavy ion radiotherapy can benefit from combined immunotherapy, using cancer vaccines, and are instructive for the translation of radioimmunotherapy combinations using heavy ions into the clinic,” explain TRON scientists Dr. Fulvia Vascotto and Dr. Nadja Salomon.

“The aim of the current experiment at GSI/FAIR is to directly compare the effectiveness of carbon ions and X-rays (conventional radiation therapy), each combined with mRNA based vaccine specific for a mouse tumor model,” describes Dr. Alexander Helm, scientist in GSI's Biophysics Department and responsible for the experiment coordination. The experiment breaks completely new ground: Particle therapy with carbon ions and therapeutic cancer vaccines were never combined before.

The immune system plays an important role in the prevention and cure against cancer. Usually, it recognizes degenerated cells and can “sort them out". At the same time, it is equipped with highly complex control mechanisms to avoid overreactions. This is exactly what cancer cells can sometimes use to their advantage and to down-regulate immune surveillance. They disappear from the radar, so to speak, they camouflage so skillfully that the endogenous defenses do not recognize the enemy or are too weak to attack it. Immunotherapy can reactivate the immune system in the fight against cancer.

The approach pursued in pre-clinical studies at TRON leads to stimulate the immune system via vaccination with messenger RNA (mRNA). With the vaccination - the fragile mRNA is packed in a protective lipid envelope - the tumor-diseased organism receives valuable information. Like an educator, the vaccine uptaken by antigen presenting cells instructs the immune system specifically, activates it to produce antigens and mobilizes it against the mutated cancer cells. This cancer vaccine is based on similar technologies as mRNA-based vaccines used against covid 19.

There is already an indication that conventional radiation therapy (high-energy X-rays) as a second component in addition to mRNA vaccine synergize, showing more efficient in anti-tumoral effects reinforcing the immune system. The immunological effects of heavy ion therapy in contrast are less known. Radiotherapy with carbon ions was developed at GSI and is now very successfully in clinical application in Heidelberg and Marburg and in nine other centers worldwide. Can carbon ion radiotherapy be beneficial for certain types of tumors and can it open up new clinical perspectives for more cancer patients? It is possible that this form of therapy is more immunogenic, i.e. it could trigger an even stronger immune response than conventional radiation therapy and, together with an individualized mRNA vaccine, might result in generating more patients responding to these therapeutic combinations. These are the type of questions, to which this proof-of-concept experiment would like to provide an answer.

Last year, an international team of researchers led by the GSI Department of Biophysics, with lead author Dr. Alexander Helm, had already published first promising results for the potential benefit of a treatment combination of carbon ions and immunotherapy. The researchers were able to demonstrate that carbon ions plus immunotherapy is more effective in controlling lung metastases than both therapies alone and more effective than X-rays plus immunotherapy. However, the immunotherapy was based on checkpoint inhibitors instead of the therapeutic mRNA vaccine used now.

The progress of the current cancer research at TRON in Mainz will provide new answers, for example regarding tumor control/regression (here a colorectal adenocarcinoma) and on the mechanisms involving immunological cell players acting in the anti-tumoral effects. In order to better assess this potential, further research has to be conducted and finally the application in clinical studies must be tested. “Scientific synergies by complementary research act as accelerator for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. Joint research activities such as the ongoing one between GSI and TRON are therefore of great importance for future cancer research” emphasizes Michael Föhlings, Managing Director of TRON.

The further development of tumor therapy with charged particles is a field of expertise of Professor Marco Durante, Head of the GSI Biophysics Research Department. He is eagerly awaiting the results of the TRON studies: “Particle therapy is rapidly growing and is potentially the most effective and precise radiotherapy technique. Combining it with most advanced vaccines is an extremely promising approach. The goal is always to answer the central question: How to treat and to achieve the most efficient, the best immune response in the fight against cancer. The entire experience of TRON and GSI/FAIR in the field of cancer research will be bundled and strengthened in this project. For me, this is a highlight of our current FAIR Phase 0 experimental program.”

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino says: “I am tremendously excited by these experiments. The fact that an mRNA-based vaccine is being studied in conjunction with ion beams to develop a potential new cancer therapy is one perfect example of the great potential of basic research at our accelerator facilities to produce new results, which can benefit society. The first stage of the FAIR experimental program, the precursor program FAIR Phase 0, is already offering outstanding opportunities. With the construction of the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, we want to expand and further develop this potential in global cooperation." (BP)

About TRON:

TRON gGmbH is a biopharmaceutical research organization that pursues new diagnostics and drugs for the treatment of cancer and other severe diseases with high medical need. A focus of TRON is the development of novel platforms for individualized therapies and biomarkers, translating basic research into drug applications. TRON partners with academic institutions, biotech companies and the pharmaceutical industry, executing research with leading-edge technologies and supporting the development of innovative drugs to promote human health.

About GSI/FAIR:

The GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt operates a world unique accelerator facility for ions. Some of the best-known results are the discovery of six new chemical elements and the development of a new type of cancer therapy. The new international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), one of the largest research projects worldwide, is currently under construction at GSI. At FAIR, matter that usually only exists in the depth of space will be produced in a lab for research. Scientists from all over the world will use the facility for experiments to gain new insights about the building blocks of matter and the evolution of the universe, from the Big Bang to the present. They will also develop new applications in medicine and technology.

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Presse Aktuelles
news-5084 Fri, 18 Jun 2021 09:00:00 +0200 Research project in New Delhi: Fellowship for GSI scientist Dr. Rahul Singh https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5084&cHash=23715604f492a5d3162b01e363249a18 GSI scientist Dr. Rahul Singh was awarded a Research Fellowship “Visiting Advanced Joint Research (VAJRA) Faculty Scheme”. In this context, he received an invitation to spend several months of research in India within a year funded by the Indian government. At the Inter-University Accelerator Center (IUAC) in New Delhi, he will research on the field of longitudinal beam optics and diagnostics for High Current Injector (HCI) development together with collaborators from IUAC. GSI scientist Dr. Rahul Singh was awarded a Research Fellowship “Visiting Advanced Joint Research (VAJRA) Faculty Scheme”. In this context, he received an invitation to spend several months of research in India within a year funded by the Indian government. At the Inter-University Accelerator Center (IUAC) in New Delhi, he will research on the field of longitudinal beam optics and diagnostics for High Current Injector (HCI) development together with collaborators from IUAC.

The VAJRA Faculty Scheme for scientists will allow Dr. Rahul Singh to conduct a joint research project together with his peers at the IUAC in New Delhi within 2021. This prestigious research grant of the Science and Engineering Research Board, Government (SERB), a statutory body under the Indian Department of Science and Technology, is a special funding program to enable talented researchers of Indian origin (It can also be German citizens) to engage in scientific exchange and research collaboration in India consequential to closer cooperation among partner institutes.

Dr Rahul Singh is in the Beam Diagnostics department at GSI and FAIR, working as a work package leader for closed orbit feedback for future Synchrotron machine of FAIR: SIS-100. His current research focus is on signal processing algorithms for synchrotrons and storage rings, feedback systems and optimization of slow extraction at FAIR. Further research interests include application of transition radiation for transverse and longitudinal diagnostics in different parts of GSI accelerator facility, inverse modelling of the accelerator as well as application of machine learning techniques towards performance improvements of diagnostic devices.

VAJRA (Visiting Advanced Joint Research) Faculty Scheme from Science and Engineering Research Board, Government (SERB) India is a dedicated program exclusively for overseas scientists and academicians with emphasis on Non-resident Indians (NRI) and Persons of Indian Origin (PIO) to work as adjunct / visiting faculty for a specific period of time in Indian Public funded academic and research institutions.

The Indian host research institute, the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), is the first Inter-University Centre (IUC) of University Grant Commission (UGC) of India - established in 1984 as an autonomous institution called Nuclear Science Centre after dual approval of planning commission with an objective to provide within the university system world class accelerator systems along with experimental facilities and to create basic infrastructure to facilitate internationally competitive research in the area of Nuclear Physics, Material Science, Atomic Physics, Radiation Biology, Radiation Physics and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. The center became a national user facility in 1991 and has India’s largest tandem accelerator and added subsequently other accelerators including a superconducting Linear accelerator, a 1.7MeV Pelletron accelerator, an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Ion source based Low Energy Ion Beam Facility.

Further information

Interested to know more of the program can contact program coordinator Dr. Pradeep Ghosh.

Related links

GET_INvolved Program

VAJRA Program – India

IUAC New Delhi – India

Excellence Award to Dr Rahul Singh by GSI/FAIR management

 

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FAIR News (DEU) Aktuelles FAIR
news-5082 Wed, 16 Jun 2021 09:00:00 +0200 Perspectives for future tumor therapy: New FLASH method for ultrafast, high-dose heavy ion irradiation tested for the first time https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5082&cHash=d0c4904e0251b17f04b8e4f86d5747f2 It could become a breakthrough for future tumor treatments with heavy ions and pave new ways: In the current experiment period FAIR-Phase 0, the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the future accelerator center FAIR succeeded in performing a carbon ion FLASH experiment for the first time. The scientists involved were able to achieve the very high dose rates required and to irradiate tumors. The success was a collective effort of the GSI Biophysics Department and the accelerator crew on the GS It could become a breakthrough for future tumor treatments with heavy ions and pave new ways: In the current experiment period FAIR-Phase 0, the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the future accelerator center FAIR succeeded in performing a carbon ion FLASH experiment for the first time. The scientists involved were able to achieve the very high dose rates required and to irradiate tumors. The success was a collective effort of the GSI Biophysics Department and the accelerator crew on the GSI/FAIR campus in close collaboration with the German Cancer Research Center DKFZ and the Heidelberg Ion Therapy (HIT) center.

The topic of FLASH irradiation is in strong focus worldwide and is also a main research topic within clinical radiobiology at GSI Biophysics. The FLASH method is a new highly promising radiation therapy method. The word “flash” refers to lightning. Fitting to that, in radiation medicine, this means ultra-short and ultra-high radiation, where the treatment dose is delivered in sub-second timescales. The aim of FLASH irradiation is to apply a very high dose in a very short time. Traditional radiation therapy, as well as proton or ion therapy, deliver smaller doses of radiation to a patient over an extended period, whereas FLASH radiotherapy is thought to require only a few short irradiations, all lasting less than 100 milliseconds.

Recent in-vivo investigations have shown, in the field of electron radiation, that the FLASH method with an ultra-high dose rate is less harmful to healthy tissue, but just as efficient as conventional dose-rate radiation to inhibit tumor growth. Such an effect has not yet been demonstrated for proton and for ion beam irradiation, which is the basis of the tumor therapy with carbon ions developed at GSI. There is still a lot of research to be done here. The results of the current experiment at GSI are now being evaluated and will contribute to new knowledge.

However, the topic is not only a great challenge scientifically, but also technically: Until now, FLASH technique has only been applicable using electron and proton accelerators. While the required dose rates for electrons and protons can be achieved with a cyclotron (circular accelerator), this is more difficult with the synchrotrons required in heavy ion therapy, such as the SIS18 at GSI. That is why the current FAIR Phase 0 experiment is a very crucial step: Thanks to the improvements at the existing GSI accelerator facility as part of the preparations for FAIR, the necessary dose rate in millisecond range can now also be achieved for carbon. However, a lot of technical development and research is still needed, before the procedure is technically advanced enough to be routinely used on patients.

Professor Marco Durante, Head of the GSI Biophysics Research Department, was very pleased with the important success in FLASH irradiation: “It is a forward-looking method that could significantly increase the therapeutic window in radiotherapy. I am very happy that the researchers and the accelerator team were able to demonstrate the possibility to create conditions with carbon beams that are necessary for FLASH therapy of tumors. If we can combine the great effect and precision of heavy ion therapy with FLASH irradiation while maintaining efficacy and causing little damage to healthy tissue, this could pave the way of a future radiation therapy several years from now".

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, is also very delighted: „The combination of expertise in biophysics and medicine as well as engineering excellence allows the first world-class experiments FLASH irradiation with ion beams to be performed. This could result in important complements to existing radiation therapies. Applications in tumor therapy are one of the research areas that can benefit from the recent increased intensities of GSI accelerators. However, modern radiobiology will substantially benefit from beams with even higher intensities, such as we will have at the FAIR facility currently under construction. FLASH is a first example of these future directions of work”. (BP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5080 Wed, 02 Jun 2021 09:00:00 +0200 Ring closure for large FAIR accelerator: structural work is completed https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5080&cHash=c14457c572a7e76c0265e21bb564eeff It is a central part of the future accelerator center FAIR, currently being built in international collaboration at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum in Darmstadt, and at the same time the heart of one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide: the large underground FAIR ring accelerator SIS100 on the northern FAIR construction site with a circumference of 1,100 meters. On the same place where the groundbreaking ceremony was held a few years ago, representing the start of the building and civil en It is a central part of the future accelerator center FAIR, currently being built in international collaboration at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum in Darmstadt, and at the same time the heart of one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide: the large underground FAIR ring accelerator SIS100 on the northern FAIR construction site with a circumference of 1,100 meters. On the same place where the groundbreaking ceremony was held a few years ago, representing the start of the building and civil engineering works, a decisive step has now been reached: The structural work for the SIS100 is completed. The ring closure of the tunnel system has been made, and the concrete layer of the last tunnel slab has been poured. The ring closure marks an important milestone in the realization process of the entire FAIR project.

The large ring tunnel consists of the two tunnel areas running next to each other, one for the accelerator machine and the other for the corresponding technical and supply facilities. The base lies at a depth of 18 meter. The ring tunnel for the accelerator was built in several segments, each about 25 meters long. After the completion of the load-bearing parts, the ground slabs, walls and ceiling structure, the assembly of the technical building equipment (TGA) such as electrical supply, air-conditioning technology, safety technology etc. is upcoming. The excavation pit will now be backfilled progressively, and additional storage and lay-down areas for the TGA companies will be prepared above ground. After the last slab has been concreted, a logistics opening is still being kept open so that the majority of the formwork for the tunnel can be lifted through. Later, it will also be closed.

SIS100 is a project of superlatives, which is also reflected in some key data: In the northern excavation pit, with its underground ring accelerator as the central building structure, almost one million cubic meters of earth were excavated for construction, to a large part it will be backfilled on site. Around 159,000 cubic meters of concrete were used for the SIS100 accelerator ring, and 27,000 tons of steel ensure the reliable stability of the underground structure.

The Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, was pleased with the completion of this stage, which is so important for the entire FAIR project: “FAIR is a scientifically and technically extraordinary construction project. It requires customized solutions, and numerous individual trades have to mesh. Therefore, structural and civil engineering, accelerator development and construction, and the scientific experiments are closely coordinated in our integrated overall planning. The recent ring closure is the result of precise planning and implementation and a substantial progress for the entire project. The close interlocking and integrated coordination with all parties and stakeholders involved is a decisive milestone of the realization strategy for the FAIR project”. (BP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-5078 Thu, 20 May 2021 12:35:36 +0200 Europium stars in the dwarf galaxy Fornax: Physics research team succeeds in gaining new insight into the origin of the elements https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=5078&cHash=bdb6843f68007b34bff1efcdc3247473 A physics research team led by the TU Darmstadt has discovered the highest ever observed europium content in stars. The results of the EUROPIUM group led by Professor Almudena Arcones from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and TU Darmstadt, who was awarded a grant by the European Research Council, has now been published in "The Astrophysical Journal". Co-authors are Dr. Moritz Reichert (member of EUROPIUM) and Dr. Camilla Hansen from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg. This news is based on a press release of the TU Darmstadt

A physics research team led by the TU Darmstadt has discovered the highest ever observed europium content in stars. The results of the EUROPIUM group led by Professor Almudena Arcones from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and TU Darmstadt, who was awarded a grant by the European Research Council, has now been published in "The Astrophysical Journal". Co-authors are Dr. Moritz Reichert (member of EUROPIUM) and Dr. Camilla Hansen from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg.

Europium is the key for understanding the formation of the heavy elements by the fast neutron capture process, the so-called r-process.  This is crucial both for the formation of half of the elements heavier than iron and for the total abundance of thorium and uranium in the universe. The EUROPIUM group has combined theoretical astrophysical simulations with observations of the oldest stars in our Galaxy and in dwarf galaxies. The latter are small, dark-matter dominated galaxies orbiting our Galaxy. Dwarf galaxies are excellent test objects for studying the r-process, as some of the oldest metal-poor stars, those that have existed for 10 to 13 billion years, have exhibited an overabundance of r-process elements. Studies have even postulated that only a single neutron-rich event could be responsible for this enrichment in the smallest dwarf galaxies.

With their discovery, the researchers in Darmstadt and Heidelberg have succeeded in determining the highest europium content ever observed – and they have created a new name for these stars: "europium stars". These stars belong to the dwarf galaxy Fornax – a dwarf spheroidal galaxy with a high stellar content. In their publication, the group also reports the first ever observation of lutetium in a dwarf galaxy and the largest sample of observed zirconium.

The "europium stars" in Fornax were born shortly after an explosive production of heavy elements. Based on the high stellar metal abundance, the extreme r-process event must have occurred as recently as four to five billion years ago. This is a very rare finding, as most europium-rich stars are much older.  Therefore, europium stars provide insight into the origin of elements in the universe at a very specific and late time.

Heavy elements are formed by the r-process in the merger of two neutron stars or in the explosive end of massive stars with strong magnetic fields. The EUROPIUM group has analyzed these two high-energy events and performed detailed studies of element production in these environments. However, due to the still large uncertainties in the nuclear physics data, it is not possible to unambiguously assign the heavy elements in the "europium stars" to one of these astrophysical environments. Future experiments in the new accelerator center FAIR at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt will significantly reduce these uncertainties. The FAIR facility promises unique opportunities in this field of research: With its motto "The Universe in the Laboratory", it is intended to reproduce conditions as they occur in astrophysical environments on Earth, thus expanding the knowledge about our cosmos.

In addition, the new Hessian cluster project ELEMENTS, in which Professor Arcones is a principal investigator, will uniquely combine simulations of neutron star fusion, nucleosynthesis calculations with the latest experimental information and observations to investigate the long-standing question: Where and how are heavy elements produced in the universe? (TUD/BP)

Further information

Scientific publication in "The Astriphysical Journal"

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3789 Tue, 04 May 2021 10:00:48 +0200 Exploring the strong interaction in the universe https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3789&cHash=8552f2d21de3bd7b305d4d8116801a16 Achim Schwenk, Professor of Physics at the Technical University (TU) Darmstadt and Max Planck Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, has been awarded a prestigious Advanced Grant by the European Research Council (ERC). His research project "Exploring the Universe through Strong Interactions" (EUSTRONG) will be funded with around 2.3 million euros over a period of five years. This is already the second ERC grant for Professor Schwenk. This news is based on a press release of the Technical University Darmstadt.

Achim Schwenk, Professor of Physics at the Technical University (TU) Darmstadt and Max Planck Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, has been awarded a prestigious Advanced Grant by the European Research Council (ERC). His research project "Exploring the Universe through Strong Interactions" (EUSTRONG) will be funded with around 2.3 million euros over a period of five years. This is already the second ERC grant for Professor Schwenk.

The goal of the EUSTRONG project is to explore the Strong Interaction, one of the four fundamental forces of nature, in the Universe. The Strong Interaction is responsible for holding neutrons and protons together in the atomic nucleus and for understanding the densest observable matter inside neutron stars. In addition, atomic nuclei play a key role in the search for dark matter and in the study of the lightest neutrino particles. EUSTRONG will enable new discoveries in the physics of the Strong Interaction by developing innovative theories and methods.

The equation of state of dense nuclear matter, for example, sets the scale for the mass and radius of neutron stars. At extreme densities beyond those achieved in atomic nuclei, astrophysical observations are particularly interesting. For example, information about the radius of neutron stars, which is sensitive to high densities, can be obtained from LIGO/Virgo observations of gravitational waves from neutron star mergers, as well as from new observations with NASA's NICER instrument on the International Space Station.

“So far, this fits very well with our understanding about the equation of state of nuclear matter,” explains Professor Schwenk. “With EUSTRONG, we want to for the first time derive direct constraints on the dense-matter interactions from these astrophysical observations, and thus develop a unified description of matter in nuclei and stars.”

Another milestone of the ERC project is the acceleration of many-body calculations with new emulation and network methods to enable systematic and global ab initio calculations based on the Strong Interaction for heavy nuclei. One focus are extremely neutron-rich heavy nuclei (around neutron number 126), which play a central role in the synthesis of elements in the Universe. The accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) in Darmstadt will be leading in this region of the nuclear chart.

Based on these new developments, Professor Schwenk and his team also want to investigate key nuclei that are used in extremely sensitive detectors that search for dark matter and for the discovery of coherent neutrino scattering, which was recently achieved for the first time. In the exploration of dark matter in the Universe and of new physics beyond the Standard Model, the Strong Interaction therefore also plays an essential role.

“The second award by the ERC underlines how outstanding Professor Achim Schwenk's research achievements are,” emphasizes Professor Barbara Albert, Vice President for Research and Young Scientists at TU Darmstadt. Professor Schwenk is particularly excited to be working with excellent young scientists in the new EUSTRONG team, “because the conditions in nuclear physics are unique here and the students and postdocs are great”. (TUD/CP)

Further information
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3786 Mon, 26 Apr 2021 12:06:55 +0200 New mega crane for the FAIR construction project https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3786&cHash=5faa8542850a871729c0fcd3b604f202 It can lift loads up to 32 tons, measures more than 67 meters in height and offers a cantilever of up to 80 meters in length: The central tower crane for the south construction area recently assembled on the FAIR construction site is really huge. It serves one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide, the international accelerator center FAIR, which is currently under construction at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. Currently, further major realization step It can lift loads up to 32 tons, measures more than 67 meters in height and offers a cantilever of up to 80 meters in length: The central tower crane for the south construction area recently assembled on the FAIR construction site is really huge. It serves one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide, the international accelerator center FAIR, which is currently under construction at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. Currently, further major realization steps are imminent. Following the development of the north construction site with its large SIS100 ring accelerator and the central transfer building, the development of the southern area of the FAIR construction site is now increasingly getting into focus.

The new large tower crane for the southern area was delivered on twelve semitrailers, the installation team consisted of seven men, and the assembly time including preparation on the ground and calibration and adjustment works was two days. The new Potain MDT 809 crane is the largest so-called topless tower crane ever built by POTAIN (Manitowoc group). Tower cranes of this type are already in service on several construction sites in Europe, North America and Asia-Pacific, including the reconstruction of Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris, which was destroyed by a major fire. The tower crane MDT 809 at FAIR is the first to be put into service in Germany.

It will carry out its work there during the next years, lifting large loads that need to be moved on the mega construction site. The special features of the powerful crane — it is one of the largest at the FAIR construction site — include high load capacity and the use of high-performance technology such as very precise driving and remote diagnostics with Crane Control System (CCS). There were also particularities in the assembly by the company STRABAG BMTI. Due to the large unit weights, all components of the tower crane were assembled in the air in individual parts. This assembly process took 7 hours, which is fast for such a large tower crane. The weight of the complete tower crane is 155 tons.

STRABAG BMTI GmbH & Co. KG is a service company within the STRABAG Group responsible for the scheduling, procurement, rental and maintenance of all construction machinery and vehicles. Machines, equipment/plant technology and vehicles from all areas of activity of the Group are managed and supervised.

Founded in 1902, Manitowoc Company Inc. is a crane manufacturer with more than 115 manufacturing, sales and service facilities in 26 countries. The global company is a supplier of crawler cranes (Manitowoc brand), tower cranes (Potain), mobile telescopic cranes (Grove) and truck-mounted cranes (National Crane).

The GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt operates a large accelerator facility for ions that is unique in the world. The best-known results are the discovery of new chemical elements and the development of a new type of cancer therapy. The new international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), one of the largest research projects worldwide, is currently under construction at GSI. Scientists from all over the world will use the facility for experiments to gain new insights about the building blocks of matter and the evolution of the universe, from the Big Bang to the present. They will also develop new applications in medicine and technology. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3784 Fri, 23 Apr 2021 07:03:00 +0200 Record participation at the virtual Girls'Day of GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3784&cHash=bcdd23bcca293dc0546b7bb4e75f64cd GSI and FAIR participated in the Germany-wide day of action Girls'Day on April 22. Due to the Corona pandemic, the Girls'Day took place as a video conference in which 90 girls participated. For GSI and FAIR, this is a new participation record; additionally, due to the online format, there was also a chance for participants living far away all over Germany to take part in the event. GSI and FAIR participated in the Germany-wide day of action Girls'Day on April 22. Due to the Corona pandemic, the Girls'Day took place as a video conference in which 90 girls participated. For GSI and FAIR, this is a new participation record; additionally, due to the online format, there was also a chance for participants living far away all over Germany to take part in the event.

First thing in the morning at 9 a.m., the video conference kicked off with a welcome from the organizing Public Relations department and a greeting from Dorothee Sommer, Head of Human Resources. "Gender equality is very important for us here at GSI and FAIR," Sommer explained. "Our goal is to get girls excited about working in science and technology and to encourage them to include these fields of activity in their career choices. We offer apprenticeships and the opportunity to conduct final theses for bachelor's, master's or PhD degrees together with our university partners. We‘d be delighted if the participants later chose to apply to work with us!"

The event continued with a get-to-know-you game and an online tour of GSI's accelerator facilities and experiments, as well as the construction site for the international research center FAIR. Whether it was the linear accelerator, the tumor therapy, the production of new elements or the HADES experiment — the girls were able to take a look at all the facilities via pre-recorded videos. The construction of FAIR was presented via clips of the tests of magnets and of the FAIR construction work and via a drone flight over the construction site.

As in a real science conference, two different sessions then went into detail: the girls could choose from two modules in which specialist departments presented their fields of work and job profiles. In these, research departments such as materials research and the ALICE detector introduced themselves, and many of the technical departments on campus gave an insight into their activities. The participants learned how the small targets for the particle accelerator are produced in the target lab, how cryotechnology is used to obtain extremely low temperatures and thus operate superconducting magnets, how components can be manufactured by turning, milling and drilling in the mechanical workshop, or how huge amounts of data are processed in the computing center. In addition, there was information about how a PhD thesis at GSI/FAIR is conducted. And here, too, an insight into the FAIR construction site and the everyday work of the architects and civil engineers was part of the proceedings.

The participants had the opportunity to ask questions to the experts during each presentation and made good use of it: "What are all the professional fields you have?", "How much do physicists earn and how long did you study per day?", "Can you also research a supernova with a particle accelerator?" or "How many particles are sent through a particle accelerator on average?” That it was a successful day was shown by comments such as "Thank you for the great presentations, it was super great!" or "The day was cool, you learned a lot, and you could understand the lectures well."

"It was a different Girls'Day than we are used to from the on-site events. But we had a lot of fun!" reported physicist and organizer Carola Pomplun from the Public Relations department of GSI/FAIR. "We were very pleased about the great response to our online offer and, of course, the lively participation of the girls on the day of the event. The many colleagues from the technical departments who supported us so energetically during the event were able to convey their enthusiasm for working in research and technology and gave fascinating insights into their everyday professional life. I hope this helped us inspire a few girls to pursue careers in STEM fields."

Girls’Day is a day of action all over Germany. On this day, businesses, universities, and other institutions all over Germany open their doors to schoolgirls from grade 5 and above. The participants learn about courses of study and training in professions in the areas of IT, natural sciences, and technology — areas in which women have rarely been employed in the past. GSI and — since its foundation — also FAIR have been participating in the annual event since the early days of Girls'Day. (CP)

Further information
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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3782 Thu, 01 Apr 2021 10:00:00 +0200 Online visits at GSI and FAIR will be continued https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3782&cHash=acf6692bab570117a1734749ee862da7 As there is a lot of interest in the online visits at GSI and FAIR, the popular offer will be continued: The next date is April 8 (Thursday) at 2 pm; further dates are in preparation and will be published on our homepage. The live moderated events offer a comprehensive insight into current research and the experimental facilities at GSI/FAIR and allow individual questions to be asked, which will be answered by the presenters. Also included is an exclusive view at the mega construction site for the future a As there is a lot of interest in the online visits at GSI and FAIR, the popular offer will be continued: The next date is April 8 (Thursday) at 2 pm; further dates are in preparation and will be published on our homepage. The live moderated events offer a comprehensive insight into current research and the experimental facilities at GSI/FAIR and allow individual questions to be asked, which will be answered by the presenters. Also included is an exclusive view at the mega construction site for the future accelerator center FAIR, one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide.

Following an introductory lecture, a guided video tour will take the participants to several research sites and facilities on campus: Among other things, the participants can visit the 120-meter-long linear accelerator UNILAC or the main control room online and learn a lot about the unique research at GSI and FAIR. Interesting facts inform about the construction of components for the international accelerator center FAIR, currently being built at GSI.

Detailed information on technical requirements and access modalities to participate in the digital discovery tour into the world of GSI and FAIR is available at www.gsi.de/en/besichtigung. Registration for the event dates is not necessary. Up to 500 people can participate. Further questions about the online offer can be sent by e-mail to besichtigung(at)gsi.de. (BP)

Further Information

All details about the online visits

Next date: 08.04.2021, 14:00

Further dates: im preparation (to be published here)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3780 Thu, 25 Mar 2021 07:03:00 +0100 ALICE Masterclass in virtual format https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3780&cHash=2a644a8a2a661648ad47b773bd68c6fc Also in this year GSI and FAIR participated in the International Masterclasses for particle physics. Within the framework of an ALICE Masterclass, 30 students were able to get an insight into the daily work and data analysis in particle physics. ALICE is one of the four large experiments at the accelerator LHC located at the European research center CERN in Geneva. ALICE investigates in particular collisions of nuclei of heavy lead atoms. Due to the Corona pandemic, the event was held in a virtual format. Also in this year GSI and FAIR participated in the International Masterclasses for particle physics. Within the framework of an ALICE Masterclass, 30 students were able to get an insight into the daily work and data analysis in particle physics. ALICE is one of the four large experiments at the accelerator LHC located at the European research center CERN in Geneva. ALICE investigates in particular collisions of nuclei of heavy lead atoms. Due to the Corona pandemic, the event was held in a virtual format. It was conducted in cooperation with the German ALICE university sites in Frankfurt and Münster as well as the AG MINT-Zentrum at the Schuldorf Bergstraße.

Responsible for the organization of the ALICE Masterclasses at GSI/FAIR is Dr. Ralf Averbeck from the research department "ALICE". "GSI has been involved in the development of new detector instruments for ALICE and in the scientific program from the very beginning. The GSI computing center is an integral part of the computing network for data analysis of the ALICE experiment. An ALICE International Masterclass, which we are now conducting for the tenth time, therefore fits well into the program," explains the physicist. "In our Masterclass, the students have the opportunity to become researchers themselves and analyze real experimental data from ALICE, which was recorded in collisions of lead nuclei. Since the analysis takes place on the computer anyway, we could convert the usual in-person activity into a virtual format and thus continue it during the pandemic."

When lead atomic nuclei collide with unimaginable energy in the LHC collider, conditions like those prevailing in the first moments of the universe are created. During the collisions, a so-called quark-gluon plasma is formed for a very short time — a state of matter that existed in the universe shortly after the Big Bang. This plasma transforms back into normal matter within fractions of a second. The particles produced in the process provide information about the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. Thus, the measurements can look into the birth of the cosmos and reveal information about the basic building blocks of matter and their interactions.

In addition to data analysis on two consecutive afternoons, the program also included introductory lectures on particle physics and computer-based data analysis as well as a live tour of the ALICE experiment in Geneva.

The Masterclasses are organized by the IPPOG (International Particle Physics Outreach Group), of which GSI is an associate member. Each year, more than 13,000 students from 60 countries come to one of about 225 nearby universities or research centers for a day to unlock the mysteries of particle physics. Many of the otherwise on-site events have been transformed into online formats due to the Corona pandemic. All events in Germany are held in collaboration with the Netzwerk Teilchenwelt, of which GSI/FAIR is a member. The goal of the nationwide network for communicating particle physics to young people and teachers is to make particle physics accessible to a broader public. (CP)

Further information:
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Aktuelles
news-3774 Tue, 23 Mar 2021 07:05:00 +0100 Closed Hypersurfaces — Technology Transfer Project Receives Funding from the Hessian Digital Ministry https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3774&cHash=c0f260492a02f8aecd374e88bc7046ba Within the framework of the funding initiative Distr@l of the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Development, a project of GSI/FAIR is funded this year with a sum of about 45,000 Euros. The so-called RoSEN methods are a software developed for the description of closed surfaces in multidimensional spaces. In a feasibility study the funding is to be used to test and evaluate application scenarios together with collaboration partners from industry. For example, the method could be used for ... Within the framework of the funding initiative Distr@l of the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Development, a project of GSI/FAIR is funded this year with a sum of about 45,000 Euros. The so-called RoSEN methods are a software developed for the description of closed surfaces in multidimensional spaces. In a feasibility study the funding is to be used to test and evaluate application scenarios together with collaboration partners from industry. For example, the method could be used for applications in the medical and business management sectors or in photogrammetry.

With the help of RoSEN (Robust (hyper)Surface Extraction Prodecures in N Dimensions), data sets of any number of dimensions can be analyzed for similar data features. The resulting hypersurfaces of equal characteristic values can be identified, visualized and described, which, with the help of the results, enables a further digital processing, be it in the algebraic, numeric or graphical sense. The method was originally developed to evaluate experimental data and simulate complex physical phenomena in heavy ion physics, as they occur in accelerator experiments at GSI/FAIR.

"Compared to other methods, the RoSEN methods have been shown to have many advantages, such as a much lower error frequency, a more efficient computational performance, or the generality of being able to be used for data sets of arbitrary dimensionality," explains theoretical physicist Dr. Bernd Schlei. He develops software for the "System Design SIS 18 / SIS 100" department and is the inventor of the RoSEN method. "In particular, the efficiency and unlimited application bandwidth are properties that could be used for significant process innovations in existing digital tools and as product innovations in potential future application areas in the form of new digital tools."

In a feasibility study for future commercial use in four to five technical-economically relevant application fields, both potential process and product innovations are to be identified at an early stage to lay the foundation for a subsequent technology transfer project. The application scenarios will be tested in partnerships with cooperation partners, some of whom have already been preselected. "RoSEN is a good example of how findings derived from basic research can also be used for applications that can benefit society as a whole," says Dr. Tobias Engert, head of Technology Transfer at GSI/FAIR, in praise of the method. "We are interested in further cooperation partners, especially from the fields of medical technology, pharmacology and business administration, for the test phase."

GSI contracted TREAVES Research & Consult GmbH as a door opener to potential users and to coordinate the feasibility study. Treaves itself is a spin-off of graduates of the University of Applied Sciences and the Technical University Darmstadt and acts as a service provider for applied natural sciences. Particularly in the field of digitization, the company has already gained extensive experience in the implementation of funded projects and brings a wide range of contacts from industry.

Half of the project costs of around 91,000 euros will be financed by GSI/FAIR and the other half will be funded by the Distr@l funding from the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Development. The Distr@l funding program offers a needs-based funding program in the areas of digital innovations and research and development.

The fields of application currently planned for the RoSEN feasibility study are, on the one hand, the numerical simulation of technically relevant fluid and structural dynamic problems, such as the simulation of energy storage systems for regenerative energy supply, and, on the other hand, pharmacokinetic population modeling, which plays a major role in drug development and is also being used, for example, in the context of the current Covid 19 pandemic. In the view of Dr. Arthur Rudek, the founder and managing director of Treaves GmbH, further applications could lie in industrial photogrammetry, business management control or, more generally and across industries, in the more efficient execution of optimization studies with large data populations.

Photogrammetry is used, for example, to digitize technical facilities and buildings for computer-aided process or failure analysis. Image data processing also plays an important role in medical technology, for example in the time-dependent processing of three- to four-dimensional CT, MRI or X-ray images, in the diagnosis of diseases or injuries, or in the context of the Covid 19 pandemic, for example to investigate the late effects of impaired lungs. In the context of a use for business management control, multivariant parameter spaces of business key figures are to be used for the evaluation of the economic performance of individual parts of the company, thus enabling more efficient business management processes and increased profitability. (CP)

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Aktuelles
news-3776 Fri, 19 Mar 2021 07:17:00 +0100 "target" magazine issue 19 published https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3776&cHash=0e969802574542407296de8a6c5f97a1 Our now published issue No. 19 of our GSI/FAIR magazine "target" shows the diversity of our scientific work. Research on tumor therapy, superheavy elements, black holes and exotic nuclear states in collaboration with many partner institutions is expanding our knowledge of our world and our cosmos true to our motto: the universe in the laboratory. Our now published issue No. 19 of our GSI/FAIR magazine "target" shows the diversity of our scientific work. Research on tumor therapy, superheavy elements, black holes and exotic nuclear states in collaboration with many partner institutions is expanding our knowledge of our world and our cosmos true to our motto: the universe in the laboratory.

At the same time, the construction of FAIR is progressing both on the construction field and in the production of components for accelerators and experiments. In three interviews, we introduce people whose stories are representative of all our dedicated employees and researchers. By moving to online formats, we were also able to maintain our event program for the public and expand it to new audiences. (CP)

Download of "target" – Issue 19, March 2021 (PDF, 20 MB)

Further information:
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3778 Wed, 17 Mar 2021 09:22:48 +0100 FAIR Industry Liaison Officers' meeting https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3778&cHash=44478572c97e028fbd334f83a7ab133e The Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR) hosted Industrial Liaison Officers (ILOs) from its partner countries on March 15th. The meeting provided the participating ILOs with the opportunity to get the latest update on topics related to the FAIR project, including progress on FAIR subprojects, and as well significant information about procurement and in-kind contributions. They also received informed about the other networking platforms and events, taking place in foreseeable future The Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR) hosted Industrial Liaison Officers (ILOs) from its partner countries on March 15th. The meeting provided the participating ILOs with the opportunity to get the latest update on topics related to the FAIR project, including progress on FAIR subprojects, and as well significant information about procurement and in-kind contributions. They also received informed about the other networking platforms and events, taking place in foreseeable future.

FAIR and GSI Technical Managing Director Joerg Blaurock along with FAIR and GSI Administrative Managing Director Ulrich Breuer welcomed the Industry Liaison Officers. Technical Managing Director opened the meeting and presented the FAIR project status update and the progress of the construction work and informed the ILOs with the substantial progress made in the project execution. The meeting continued with an information on the mandate from the FAIR Council and objectives of the ILO meeting, presented by David Urner, Head of the GSI/FAIR In-Kind. Anna Hall, Director of Big Science Sweden moderated a lively discussion among ILOs.

An update on the procurement guidelines and options at FAIR was given by Michele Spatar, Head of Procurement, a presentation on upcoming FAIR tender opportunities was presented by David Urner, Head of In-Kind. Their presentations were followed by a moderated session of questions and answer section where each ILO could clarify issues with the Head of Procurement and Head of In-Kind. The representatives from Swedish ILO Big Science Sweden, Frida Tibblin-Citron and UK ILO from UKRI-STFC, Carol Watts presented their scope of work and provided useful resources and insights how these ILOs are organised in their country. The ILOs were informed about other ILO centric platform and events in foreseen future to generate closer engagements between ILOs of FAIR and other mega-science facilities in procurement stage.

The ILOs agreed to have biannual meetings to keep themselves informed. The main significance of the biannual meetings is to provide the ILOs with information to promote discussions with industry and partners in their respective countries on collaboration opportunities at FAIR. The ILOs will meet again on 17th September 2021 in Darmstadt.

Further information

Latest Drone Video of the FAIR construction site

Information on FAIR/GSI procurement 

In-Kind and Procurement / ILOs information from partner countries

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3772 Mon, 15 Mar 2021 13:32:00 +0100 Science publication: Meteorites remember the conditions of stellar explosions https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3772&cHash=0e0bb3dc329d29ee503b03520b4bd9e1 A team of international researchers, including Professor Almudena Arcones from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and TU Darmstadt and Dr. Marius Eichler, went back to the formation of our Solar System, 4.6 billion years ago, and gained new insights into the cosmic origin of the heaviest elements on the periodic table, as reported in a study published in the journal Science. This news is based on a press release by the TU Darmstadt

A team of international researchers, including Professor Almudena Arcones from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and TU Darmstadt and Dr. Marius Eichler, went back to the formation of our Solar System, 4.6 billion years ago, and gained new insights into the cosmic origin of the heaviest elements on the periodic table, as reported in a study published in the journal Science.

The question of which astronomical events can host the rapid neutron-capture process, r-process in short, that produces the heaviest elements in the Universe such as iodine, gold, platinum, uranium, plutonium, and curium has been a mystery for decades. Presently, it is thought that the r-process can occur during violent collisions between two neutron stars, one neutron star and a black hole, or during rare supernova explosions following the death of massive stars.

Some of the nuclei produced by the r-process are radioactive and take millions of years to decay into stable nuclei. Iodine-129 and curium-247 are two of such radioactive nuclei. They were incorporated into meteorites during the formation of the Sun and have an amazing peculiarity: they decay at almost exactly the same rate. This means that the iodine-129 to curium-247 ratio did not changed since their production, billions of years ago. “With the iodine-129 to curium-247 ratio being frozen in time, like a prehistoric fossil, we can have a direct look into the last wave of heavy element production that built up the composition of the Solar System” says Benoit Côté, the first author of the study.

The team calculated the iodine-129 to curium-247 ratios created by collisions between neutron stars and black holes, and compared their model predictions to the value found in meteorites. They concluded that the number of neutrons during the last r-process event that preceded the birth of the Solar System cannot be too high, otherwise too much curium is produced relative to iodine. This implies that very neutron-rich sources, such as the material ripped off the surface of a neutron star during a collision, likely did not play an important role, while moderately neutron-rich conditions, often found in ejecta from the discs that form around the merging event are more consistent with the meteoritic value.

Because nucleosynthesis predictions rely on uncertain nuclear and stellar properties, the final answer to which astronomical object was the exact source is still elusive. However,  “the ability of the iodine-129 to curium-247 ratio to peer more directly into the fundamental nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis is an exciting prospect” says Dr. Marius Eichler, who was also part of the investigating team and postdoc in the group of Prof. Almudena Arcones.

Following this work, future astrophysical simulations of stellar mergers and explosions combined with nuclear experiments – such as those planned at GSI and the international accelerator center FAIR being built here – can now also be tested against meteoritic constraints to reveal the source of the heaviest elements of the Solar System.

The work of Dr. Marius Eichler and Prof. Almudena Arcones was supported in part by the ERC Starting Grant EUROPIUM and the DFG Collaborative Research Center 1245.(TUD/BP)

Further information

Scientific publication in the journal Science

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3768 Thu, 11 Mar 2021 07:44:00 +0100 FAIR-GENCO Awards 2021 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3768&cHash=043f8c5497b717a79d4fba4cea070733 Recently, the annual meeting of the FAIR-GSI Exotic Nuclei Community (GENCO) took place via videoconference. Part of the event — as every year — was the presentation of the Young Scientist Award as well as the admission of new members. The special colloquium "Ode to projectile fragmentation" was given by Professor Marek Pfuetzner from the University of Warsaw. Recently, the annual meeting of the FAIR-GSI Exotic Nuclei Community (GENCO) took place via videoconference. Part of the event — as every year — was the presentation of the Young Scientist Award as well as the admission of new members. The special colloquium "Ode to projectile fragmentation" was given by Professor Marek Pfuetzner from the University of Warsaw.

The FAIR-GENCO Young Scientist Award went to Dr. Ruben de Groote, who received his PhD in 2017 at the University in Leuven, Belgium, and is currently conducting research in laser spectroscopy of exotic atomic nuclei in Jyväskylä, Finland. The Young Scientist Award is bestowed annually by the FAIR-GSI Exotic Nuclei Community to outstanding young researchers working in the field of experimental or theoretical nuclear physics or chemistry. The winners are selected by an international jury. It is endowed with 1,000 euros and is awarded during the NUSTAR annual meeting.

With the Membership Award, the GENCO community honored the following new members:

  • Dr. Anu Kankainen (University of Jyväskylä) for her research on exotic atomic nuclei using mass spectrometry and its applications in nuclear astrophysics to better understand stellar and explosive nucleosynthesis.
  • Dr. Takehiko Saito (RIKEN and GSI) for his pioneering achievements in the production and study of hypernuclei in heavy ion reactions and the discoveries of electrically neutral nuclei.
  • Prof. Dr. Achim Schwenk (TU Darmstadt) for his outstanding theoretical work in the field of nuclear physics and his excellent contributions also to experimental work, as well as being a driving force behind many new developments at GSI.
  • Dr. Kathrin Wimmer (IEM-CSIC Madrid) for her remarkable results on the study of the shell structure of unstable atomic nuclei far from the valley of stability, and new methodological developments for experiments dealing with the investigation of the structure of very short-lived atomic nuclei at the Super-FRS at FAIR. (CP)
Further information
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3770 Tue, 09 Mar 2021 09:00:00 +0100 Renowned European research funding with close links to GSI/FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3770&cHash=a30f08e941d210a7316cb08a80fe7ee1 Each year, the European Research Council (ERC) awards several extremely prestigious research funding prizes for cutting-edge research. The outstanding quality of scientific research at GSI and FAIR was directly recognized last year with two "ERC Advanced Grants" for GSI physicists Marco Durante and Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo. In addition, GSI and FAIR also attract ERC grant laureates from other research institutions who are closely connected to GSI/FAIR through their specialist topics or who realize the exper Each year, the European Research Council (ERC) awards several extremely prestigious research funding prizes for cutting-edge research. The outstanding quality of scientific research at GSI and FAIR was directly recognized last year with two "ERC Advanced Grants" for GSI physicists Marco Durante and Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo. In addition, GSI and FAIR also attract ERC grant laureates from other research institutions who are closely connected to GSI/FAIR through their specialist topics or who realize the experimental part of their project here. The most recent examples of this: Professor Evgeny Epelbaum from Ruhr University Bochum and Dr. Kathrin Wimmer from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC).

Dr. Kathrin Wimmer from the Institute for Structure of Matter (IEM-CSIC) coordinates the project LISA (Lifetime measurements with Solid Active targets), which aims to measure rare atomic nuclei with innovative detectors and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. For the practical research part, she will also use the GSI/FAIR facilities in the framework of her just awarded "ERC Consolidator Grant".

The aim of the LISA project is to develop a novel method for lifetime measurements in atomic nuclei. Lifetimes probe the collectivity of a nucleus through its electromagnetic transition properties. The experimental approach is based on active solid targets employing novel diamond detectors and will dramatically enhance the scope of measurements in exotic nuclei. Coupled to the state-of-the-art gamma-ray tracking detector AGATA, LISA will overcome the present challenges of lifetime measurements with low-intensity beams of unstable nuclei.

LISA will exploit the unique capabilities of the FAIR accelerator center, being built at GSI. The future fragmentation facility will deliver the most exotic and highest intensity radioactive ion beams. LISA will greatly expand the nuclear structure program of HISPEC, a prominent project within the NUSTAR science pillar at FAIR. The results will have significant impact on the theoretical descriptions and modelling of atomic nuclei making their predictions more reliable.

The award winner Dr. Kathrin Wimmer, currently working at CSIC Madrid, and Dr. Jürgen Gerl, NUSTAR coordinator and head of the nuclear structure department at GSI, are very much looking forward to working together on the exciting LISA project at GSI.

Professor Evgeny Epelbaum is thematically closely connected to GSI/FAIR via his project "Nuclear Theory from First Principles", which is funded by an ERC Advanced Grant. In the project, the holder of the Chair of Theoretical Physics at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) wants to use theoretical methods to describe the forces between three nuclear particles.

Pairwise interactions between two nucleons are already relatively well understood. This enables physicists to describe what is going on inside the simplest atomic nucleus, i.e. one that consists of two nucleons. The opposite is true for more complicated atomic nuclei consisting of three or more nucleons. Here, the interactions are still a mystery. This is where Evgeny Epelbaum's research project comes in. He and his team hope to describe the forces acting in a system of three or more nucleons. To this end, the researchers are using a theoretical method known as effective field theory, which is widely used in particle physics. With this approach, the Bochum-based group already described precisely the interactions between two nucleons in the past. Now, they intend to extend the approach to three-particle forces.

Based on the theory developed under the ERC Grant, the team also wants to analyse the existing experimental data for the three-nucleon system. Experiments to understand multi-nucleon systems are an essential part of the FAIR research program in nuclear structure. The team's goal is to resolve discrepancies between theory and experiment. Moreover, numerical simulations are planned for more complex nuclear systems, which consist of even more particles, in order to explore relationships between the nuclear forces and their properties. Such simulations also provide insights into areas that are not accessible to experimental research. For example, it is possible to explore how the properties of atomic nuclei or processes in the stars depend on the constants of nature  – such as the masses of quarks.

Another example from 2020 of outstanding researchers honored with an ERC grant is Professor Beatriz Jurado from the Centre Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG), who received an ERC Advanced Grant at the same time as GSI physicists Professor Marco Durante and Professor Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo. She will also use the research facilities of GSI/FAIR to conduct the experimental part of her ERC Grant project.

Her project aims to develop a new methodology to indirectly infer neutron-induced cross sections of unstable nuclei. These cross sections are essential for nuclear astrophysics. The experimental part of Beatriz Jurado´s project will be realized at the accelerator facility on the GSI/FAIR campus as part of FAIR Phase 0, using the storage rings ESR and CRYRING.

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, expressed his enthusiasm that in addition to GSI/FAIR’s own scientists, several EU award-winning researchers are closely associated with GSI/FAIR: "I am very happy that the research community demonstrates its interest in the GSI/FAIR research facilities and the science conducted here, and that the world-class value of these themes is recognized by the ERC grant committees." (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3766 Mon, 01 Mar 2021 14:09:49 +0100 Successful High-Energy-Density Physics with laser and ion beams Workshop, “PHEDM-Hirschegg”, in online format https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3766&cHash=e7b0f2460297224e1937ff51bbe4f869 About 220 experts from all over the world participated in the "PHEDM-Hirschegg Workshop 2021": With the new meeting format as an online event, the organizers were able to make accessible the five-day meeting to a large number of participants and at the same time take the corona situation into account. About 220 experts from all over the world participated in the "PHEDM-Hirschegg Workshop 2021": With the new meeting format as an online event, the organizers were able to make accessible the five-day meeting to a large number of participants and at the same time take the corona situation into account.

For the last 40 years, the workshop on High-Energy-Density Physics with laser and ion beams has taken place as an annual event at the Darmstädter Haus of the Technical University Darmstadt in Hirschegg, Austria, where the number of participants is limited to 90. It provides an international forum to discuss high energy density physics including fundamental science, intense laser and particle beams interaction with matter and inertial confinement fusion. Many of the participants are active members of the HED@FAIR collaboration, one of the collaborations responsible for the implementation of the experimental program at the FAIR facility.

In total, this year's event included 56 talks, two poster sessions with 15 posters each, and two tutorial sessions for students, a format that was newly introduced this year. The workshop gathered participants spanning over 19 time zones, from New South Wales in Australia to California. This was made possible not only through the live streaming of the contributions but also via recording and swift availability of these through GSI’s server. At peak times, more than 120 participants were online together, and some of the researchers were connected directly from the GSI/FAIR campus in compliance with Corona rules.

FAIR has been at the forefront of preoccupations of the community gathering at the workshop for many years. As such, the presentation by the Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Paolo Giubellino on the status of the project was highly expected and the news on the recent progress were very well received. Academician Vladimir Fortov, after his tragic death in 2020,  one of the fathers of plasma physics at GSI and high-energy density research at FAIR was celebrated by many speakers, in memory of his work and engagement for science.

Current topics this year included the properties of high-energy dense matter created by intense ion beams and lasers, beam-plasma interactions, diagnostic methods for high-energy density matter, and accelerator issues of intense beams. New and upcoming high energy density (HED) facilities were also a topic.

The four Poster Awards for young scientists were presented on the last day of the event. This year, the awards were given to students from Germany, India and Russia. Professor Paolo Giubellino on this occasion emphasized the significance of junior staff development: "It is important to promote young, international talents at an early stage in order to attract the scientists of the future and offer them opportunities to develop their talent. Today's students are tomorrow's researchers, who will also work in the field of high-energy density physics. For science and also for research at the future FAIR accelerator facility, it is existential to attract and motivate the best minds." (BP)

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news-3764 Thu, 25 Feb 2021 10:00:00 +0100 Funding excellent research: dynamics of neutron stars is the focus of the cluster project ELEMENTS https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3764&cHash=14c598d6327995a18c33a732fc4c06f7 The Hessian state government is supporting cutting-edge research in Hesse with almost 40 million euros over a period of four years. Six projects of the universities in Darmstadt, Frankfurt, Giessen and Marburg together with further universities and non-university research institutions will be supported in the funding line "Cluster Projects" launched by the state from April 2021. In this way, the state is strengthening the research areas that shape the profile of Hessen's universities, including particle ph This news is based on press releases of the Hessian Ministry of Higher Education, Research, Science and the Arts and the TU Darmstadt

The Hessian state government is supporting cutting-edge research in Hesse with almost 40 million euros over a period of four years. Six projects of the universities in Darmstadt, Frankfurt, Giessen and Marburg together with further universities and non-university research institutions will be supported in the funding line "Cluster Projects" launched by the state from April 2021. In this way, the state is strengthening the research areas that shape the profile of Hessen's universities, including particle physics. One of the funded projects is ELEMENTS, in which the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung is involved.

In 2017, gravitational waves from merging neutron stars and their electromagnetic signals were detected for the first time — a turning point in multi-messenger astronomy. The cluster project ELEMENTS (Exploring the Universe from microscopic to macroscopic scales) brings together scientists from different fields of physics to investigate the origin of chemical elements in the universe. In the process, physics questions about the fundamental properties of matter will be answered. Experimentally, the project benefits from the worldwide unique infrastructure of particle accelerators in Hesse, including the FAIR facility currently under construction at GSI.

The project combines the strong research forces of several international leading institutions. It is being funded with 7.9 million euros until 2025 as part of the "Cluster Projects" funding line of the State of Hesse in preparation for the next round of the Bund-Länder Excellence Strategy. Besides Goethe University Frankfurt and TU Darmstadt, which are equally leading the project, the University of Gießen and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt are also involved. This collaboration will allow the researchers to combine their outstanding expertise in gravitational physics and in the physics of nuclear reactions, as well as to make synergistic use of the accelerator facilities in Darmstadt — the FAIR facility at GSI and the TU's electron accelerator S-DALINAC at the Institute of Nuclear Physics.

"I am delighted with this decision of the State of Hesse," said the Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino. "In the State of Hesse we understand how to bring together the right people and the right topics. We provide research structures at international top level. That enables us to achieve a leading standing in important future research fields. The current research program at GSI and FAIR offers excellent opportunities, and in the coming years the FAIR accelerator center will open up further innovative potential."

"I am extremely pleased with the decision," TU President Professor Tanja Brühl said. "It honors the synergies between outstanding university and non-university research. The globally unique particle accelerator infrastructures established here, including the future FAIR facility, will contribute to a successful future." Brühl added that the project also strengthens the alliance of Rhine-Main universities formed by the universities of Mainz, Frankfurt and Darmstadt.

ELEMENTS will study neutron stars, the barely visible little brothers of black holes. They are formed after a star has burned out when it was not massive enough to be compressed into a black hole by its own gravitational pressure after its end. Neutron stars, like black holes, are the cause of extreme space-time curvature, and when neutron stars or black holes merge, detectable gravitational waves are created. Because of their cosmic effects and extreme conditions, both phenomena are very exciting for researchers around the world. However, unlike black holes, neutron stars also allow conclusions about their interior.

Thus, neutron star mergers are visible in the sky as extremely light-intense processes, kilonovae, where the heaviest chemical elements are produced through nuclear reactions under extreme conditions. The ELEMENTS project investigates the dynamics in the fusion of two neutron stars and in this context also examines the gravitational field, nuclear matter and — the main topic of the physicists at GSI/FAIR and the TU Darmstadt — the heavy chemical elements that are created in the process. For example, the luminosity of a kilonova as a fingerprint for the production of heavy elements was successfully predicted a few years ago by physicists working in Darmstadt. (HMWK / TUD / BP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3762 Fri, 19 Feb 2021 10:14:52 +0100 Doors wide open for PANDA: Yoke of solenoid magnet assembled https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3762&cHash=2ae323a2cf3bcaa0aa204cabb4f44e6b The developments for PANDA, one of the key experiments of the future accelerator center FAIR, are progressing steadily. Another important stage has now been reached: The yoke of the PANDA solenoid magnet was fully assembled at the steel construction company SET in Novosibirsk. The final tests of doors were done recently. The developments for PANDA, one of the key experiments of the future accelerator center FAIR, are progressing steadily. Another important stage has now been reached: The yoke of the PANDA solenoid magnet was fully assembled at the steel construction company SET in Novosibirsk. The final tests of doors were done recently.

The assembly of the yoke octants is aided by a star shaped installation tool. After its removal, the octants stayed in place with minimal deviation. All parts are surveyed with a laser tracker employing fixed fiducial marks even during the assembly process, which facilitates the whole operation providing much better precision. No mechanical stoppers are used, as their precision would be too low.

The four doors, two downstream and two upstream, are bolted to the yoke in their closed position. Before opening the doors, the bolts are unfastened and the doors are lowered to the sliding rails resting then on heavy weight rollers. The 22 tons door wings were opened sliding on the rollers with a friction of only about 0.5%: Two persons were able to move one wing with a simple manual winch.

In the final configuration, the Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics (BINP) will equip the doors with hydraulic jacks and actuators, which were not part of the deliverables of SET. The yoke was again disassembled and the parts will be transported to BINP. There, they will be assembled into the complete magnet.

Currently the cryostat of the superconducting solenoid is in production. At the same time, the production of the superconducting wire is in preparation. The assembly of the entire magnet at BINP will take place next year and allow first tests. It is finally planned, to perform a precision field mapping of the large active volume of the magnet, where in future particle tracks will bend to be detected by the PANDA experiment. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3760 Mon, 15 Feb 2021 10:00:00 +0100 EU funds four research infrastructure projects with strong GSI/FAIR participation https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3760&cHash=a180a7ca3bd389f105f3eab5d59f438a Several GSI/FAIR research areas receive EU funding in the millions. Four planned infrastructure projects in the fields of tumor therapy with heavy ions, innovative methods for industrial radiation testing and new technology developments for accelerator facilities were successful in current EU tenders and have received funding commitments. FAIR and GSI play a decisive role in each of these projects, which are carried out in international collaborations. Several GSI/FAIR research areas receive EU funding in the millions. Four planned infrastructure projects in the fields of tumor therapy with heavy ions, innovative methods for industrial radiation testing and new technology developments for accelerator facilities were successful in current EU tenders and have received funding commitments. FAIR and GSI play a decisive role in each of these projects, which are carried out in international collaborations.

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, was enthusiastic about these successes: "Once again, the excellence of GSI and FAIR is underlined by the success in these calls. I am delighted about this funding, which the EU has made available to support extremely promising thematic areas. With their expertise, our researchers are among the key players in the fields now being funded. The integration of GSI and FAIR in the projects confirms the attractivity of our research infrastructures for the international community".

HITRIplus (Heavy Ion Therapy Research Integration plus) will receive the highest amount of funding, i.e. 680,000 euros. The project will be realized in the Research Department Biophysics under the leadership of Professor Marco Durante and coordinated by the National Center for Oncological Hadron Therapy CNAO in Pavia, Italy, as consortium leader. The aim of HITRIplus is to integrate pre-clinical and clinical research in cancer treatment with heavy ion beams while jointly developing its high technology.

Heavy ion beams are an extremely promising treatment method because they are more effective than any other treatment for radioresistant tumors. The ion beam focuses on the malignant tissue while sparing the healthy organs. The goal of HITRIplus is to improve heavy  ion therapy as a cutting-edge tool to treat those tumors that are not curable with X-rays or protons, and that have better survival rates, lower recurrence or milder toxicity with ions.

The HITRIplus consortium brings together for the first time all major European heavy ion therapy centers with leading European industries, academia and research laboratories. The aim is to jointly build a strong pan-European Heavy Ion Therapy Research Community. The resulting networks will structure and foster the research in heavy ion therapy, including clinical and pre-clinical research, and also develop new accelerator and beam delivery technologies. Lower costs and dimensions of new facilities should help to make cancer ion therapy more accessible to even more patients and at the same time open up new markets for European industry.

The project RADNEXT (RADiation facility Network for the EXploration of effects for indusTry and research), which is funded with 342,000 euros in the GSI/FAIR part, deals with innovative radiation testing methodologies. The project at GSI/FAIR is conducted by the research departments Biophysics and Materials Research and with its leaders Professors Marco Durante and Christina Trautmann. RADNEXT is coordinated by CERN. The project focuses on irradiation at accelerators of electronic devices for the industrial sectors of space, automotive, communication technologies, medical and accelerators, among others, which require coordinated and streamlined testing.

At present, the European economy does not yet have a coordinated network of testing facilities for these purposes. For example, such a network could provide crucial support to small and medium-sized enterprises, which in many cases have difficulty in gaining access to the required facilities. Novel testing methodologies can also pave the way for generating new radiation standards, since the existing ones are mainly restricted to classical space applications and radiation-hardened components.

Research infrastructures can play a key role in the field of radiation testing by taking the first steps towards the creation of a sustainable, coordinated irradiation testing facilities network. Finally, it will also respond to the need of establishing a radiation hardness evaluation based on risk assessment and mitigation rather than on complete risk avoidance.

353,000 Euro will be made available to GSI/FAIR with the project I.FAST (Innovation Promotion in Accelerator Science and Technology). The EU tender focuses on the particle accelerators themselves. Their use spans from the large installations devoted to fundamental science, to a wealth of facilities providing X-ray or neutron beams to a wide range of scientific disciplines.

Almost 50 institutions are involved in the successor project to the ARIES program coordinated at CERN, in which GSI is also involved. CERN is also coordinating I.FAST. GSI/FAIR is again part of the consortium with a broad-based team of researchers from different areas, which underlines the varied expertise on-site. The project is advanced by numerous accelerator groups and research departments. It aims to advance new developments in the field of accelerator-based research infrastructures and to promote innovative technologies.

In scientific laboratories, but also in medicine and industry the use of accelerators is rapidly growing. Particle accelerators are now facing critical challenges, for example with regard to the size and performance of the planned facilities and the increasing demands to accelerators for applied science. The project aims to help developing more performant and affordable technologies, and reducing power consumption. This could pave the way to a sustainable next generation of accelerators.

By involving industry via the 17 industrial companies in the consortium, I.FAST aims to generate innovation and thus support the long-term evolution of accelerator technologies in Europe. Alternative accelerator concepts will be explored and the prototyping of key technologies will be promoted. These include techniques for increasing brightness and reducing dimensions of synchrotron light sources, advanced superconducting technologies to produce higher fields with lower consumption, and strategies and technical solutions for improving energy efficiency.

Finally, the Biophysics Department under the leadership of Professor Marco Durante has a small participation in the European medical isotope programme PRISMAP (PRoduction of high purity Isotopes by mass Separation for Medical Application), coordinated by CERN. In this context, 17,000 euros go to GSI and FAIR. PRISMAP will bring together key European intense neutron sources, isotope mass separation facilities, and high-power accelerators and cyclotrons with leading biomedical research institutes and hospitals. Together they will create a sustainable source of high purity new radionuclides to advance early-phase research into radiopharmaceuticals, targeted drugs for cancer, theranostics, and personalized medicine in Europe.

Referring to the fact that all of these projects are realized in international consortia, Scientific Managing Director Paolo Giubellino remarks: "Science is a World enterprise, in which progress in frontier initiatives can only be successful if carried out at the international level. For GSI/FAIR this is a vital, strategic way of operating, and we will be able to contribute actively with our specific competence and experience in these programs which will shape future research“. (BP)

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news-3750 Thu, 11 Feb 2021 07:41:00 +0100 BASE opens up new possibilities in the search for cold dark matter https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3750&cHash=3e72a06e2d697e9e4974494462b01ab2 The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) at CERN’s Antimatter Factory has set new limits on the mass of axion-like particles – hypothetical particles that are candidates for dark matter – and constrained how easily they can turn into photons, the particles of light. This is especially significant as BASE was not designed for such studies. This news is based on a press release of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg.

The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) at CERN’s Antimatter Factory has set new limits on the mass of axion-like particles – hypothetical particles that are candidates for dark matter – and constrained how easily they can turn into photons, the particles of light. This is especially significant as BASE was not designed for such studies. The experiment’s new result, published by Physical Review Letters, describes this pioneering method and opens up new experimental possibilities in the search for cold dark matter. GSI is involved in BASE, among other things, by manufacturing some components of the experimental setup.

“BASE has extremely sensitive tuned circuit detection systems to study the properties of single trapped antiprotons. We realized that these detectors can also be used to search for signals of other particles. In this recently published work we used one of our detectors as an antenna to search for a new type of axion-like particles,” explains Jack Devlin, a CERN research fellow working on the experiment.

Axions or axion-like particles are candidates for cold dark matter. From astrophysical observations, we believe that around 26.8 percent of the matter-energy content of the Universe is made up of dark matter and only about 5 percent of ordinary – visible – matter; the remainder is the mysterious dark energy. These unknown particles feel the force of gravity, but they barely respond to the other fundamental forces, if they experience these at all. The best accepted theory of fundamental forces and particles, called the Standard Model of particle physics, does not contain any particles which have the right properties to be cold dark matter. However, since the Standard Model leaves many questions unanswered, physicists have proposed theories that go beyond, some of which explain the nature of dark matter. Among such theories are those that suggest the existence of axions or axion-like particles. These theories need to be tested and there are many experiments set up around the world to look for these particles. For the first time, the BASE experiment at CERN has turned the tools developed to detect single antiprotons to the search for dark matter.

Compared to the large detectors installed in the LHC, BASE is a much smaller experiment. It is connected to CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator, which supplies the experiment with antiprotons. BASE captures and suspends these particles in a Penning trap, a combination of electric and strong magnetic fields. To avoid collisions with ordinary matter, the trap is operated at 5 Kelvin (~−268 °C) where exceedingly low pressures, similar to those in deep space are reached (10−18 mbar). In this extremely well-isolated environment, clouds of trapped antiprotons can exist for years at a time. By carefully adjusting the electric fields, the physicists at BASE can isolate individual antiprotons and move them to a separate part of the trap. In this region, very sensitive superconducting resonant detectors can pick up the tiny electrical currents generated by single antiprotons as they move around the trap.

In the now published work, the BASE team looked for unexpected electrical signals in their sensitive antiproton detectors. At the heart of each detector is a small, approximately 4cm diameter, donut-shaped coil, which looks similar to the inductors you might find in many ordinary electronics. However, the BASE detectors are superconducting and have almost no electrical resistance, and all the surrounding components are carefully chosen so that they do not cause electrical losses. This makes the BASE detectors extremely sensitive to any small electrical fields. Physicists used the antiproton as a quantum sensor to precisely calibrate the background noise on their detector. They then began to search for unusual signals, however faint, that could hint at those induced by axion-like particles and their possible interactions with photons. Nothing was found at the frequencies that were recorded, which means that BASE succeeded in setting new limits for the mass of axion-like particles and in investigating their possible interactions with photons.

With this study, BASE opens up possibilities for other Penning trap experiments to participate in the search for dark matter. Since BASE was not built to look for these signals, several changes could be made to improve the probability of finding an axion-like particle in the future. “With this new technique, we’ve combined two previously unrelated branches of experimental physics: axion physics and high-precision Penning trap physics. Our laboratory experiment is complementary to astrophysics experiments and especially very sensitive in the low axion mass range. With a purpose-built instrument we would be able to increase the bandwidth and sensitivity to broaden the landscape of axion searches using Penning trap techniques,” says Stefan Ulmer, spokesperson for the BASE experiment collaboration.

The BASE collaboration consists of scientists from RIKEN Fundamental Symmetries Laboratory, the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg, the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), the University of Tokyo, the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, the Leibniz University Hannover, and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig. The research was performed as part of the work of the Max Planck-RIKEN-PTB Center for Time, Constants and Fundamental Symmetries, an international group established to develop high-precision measurements to better understand the physics of our Universe. (CP)

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news-3758 Tue, 09 Feb 2021 11:30:00 +0100 Accelerator in operation — FAIR Phase 0 experiments underway https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3758&cHash=f9aaf34e12b360e3cdb246c8d99c4b67 Today, the GSI/FAIR accelerator facilities successfully started a new operating phase to conduct scientific experiments of the FAIR Phase 0 program. From February to July, scientists from all over the world will investigate numerous research questions in the fields of nuclear physics, atomic physics, biophysics, materials research and plasma physics in the framework of approximately 80 approved experiments. We look forward to a rich harvest of scientific results. Today, the GSI/FAIR accelerator facilities successfully started a new operating phase to conduct scientific experiments of the FAIR Phase 0 program. From February to July, scientists from all over the world will investigate numerous research questions in the fields of nuclear physics, atomic physics, biophysics, materials research and plasma physics in the framework of approximately 80 approved experiments. We look forward to a rich harvest of scientific results.

The complete accelerator facility will be in operation: the linear accelerator UNILAC, the ring accelerator SIS18, the experimental storage ring ESR, the fragment separator FRS, the high-power laser PHELIX and, for the first time, the new FAIR storage ring CRYRING will be available for use by the researchers. A large number of experimental sites will be served, partly in parallel operation, with different ion beams from hydrogen to uranium. The science run at the GSI facilities is part of the FAIR experimental program, the so-called FAIR Phase 0, which already offers excellent experimental opportunities while FAIR is still under construction.

During the previous shutdown, numerous maintenance and modernization measures could be implemented to further prepare the existing facility for future operation as a pre-accelerator of the FAIR facility. Due to the Corona pandemic, the usual travel of domestic and foreign guest scientists remains limited during this experiment period. However, the shutdown was also used to expand remote access to parts of the facility for the researchers and improve electronic communication in order to enable the best possible performance of the scientific work. (CP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3752 Fri, 05 Feb 2021 09:00:00 +0100 Jörg Blaurock starts second term as Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3752&cHash=dca67d1a29930d9188f0649809cfa12f Jörg Blaurock will continue his successful work as Technical Managing Director of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH and Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH) for the next five years. His second term has begun on February 1, 2021. The FAIR Council and the GSI Supervisory Board have acknowledged his achievements and expressed their wish for him to continue for another term. Jörg Blaurock will continue his successful work as Technical Managing Director of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH and Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH) for the next five years. His second term has begun on February 1, 2021. The FAIR Council and the GSI Supervisory Board have acknowledged his achievements and expressed their wish for him to continue for another term.

“The GSI Supervisory Board, the FAIR Council and I personally are very delighted that Mr. Blaurock has accepted our proposal to serve in this position for another five years. The very good progress in the construction of FAIR in the last years is the result of the great commitment of the employees of GSI and FAIR, but in particular also his personal success. We are convinced that with his leadership the FAIR construction project will be successfully completed,” emphasized Ministerialdirigent Dr. Volkmar Dietz, who is the Chair of the GSI Supervisory Board and the FAIR Council and director in the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF).

The personnel decision is also a guarantee for continuity and stable conditions in the GSI and FAIR management: Together with Professor Paolo Giubellino as Scientific Managing Director and Ulrich Breuer as Administrative Managing Director, Jörg Blaurock will continue to form the joint top management of GSI and FAIR. The goal of the management team is to enable cutting-edge research at the existing facility and to realize the future accelerator facility FAIR in international collaboration.

Jörg Blaurock is looking forward to his second term with a lot of energy: "I am very pleased about the trust placed in me and the opportunity to continue to advance and shape the FAIR project." He cites solid, reliable and efficient project implementation and the on-going continuation of execution work as important goals on the way to realizing FAIR.

In the recent years, Jörg Blaurock led the FAIR project, one of the world's largest construction projects for science, through numerous challenging development processes, always keeping in view the special requirements of this extraordinary large construction site. Great progress was made in the north construction field and important stages were completed. The focus was on excavation work, concrete and structural work for crucial buildings such as the large ring accelerator SIS100, the central transfer building and the first experiment for the FAIR research program. Even under difficult corona conditions, the conditions for the progress of the work on the construction site were maintained.

In Jörg Blaurock's second term, further major realization steps are moving into the focus, such as the development of the southern construction field and the technical building equipment. The global high-tech component development for the experiments and the accelerator machine, as well as their implementation and assembly in the buildings, are also a central task for the future. The coming years will thus be dominated by further progress in order to expand even more the excellent development.

Before Jörg Blaurock, born in 1964, took up his position at GSI and FAIR, he has been working in international large-scale plant construction for over 20 years, overseeing full planning, delivery, assembly and commissioning of large technical facilities worldwide. He studied mechanical engineering at the Helmut Schmidt University in Hamburg during his career as an officer in the Bundeswehr, where he worked until 1994. He went on to work for large-scale plant construction firms Uhde GmbH and Lurgi GmbH in the turnkey production of petrochemical industrial plants at various international locations. In 2007, he joined Alstom, today General Electric, where he worked in a number of positions – most recently for General Electric Deutschland GmbH in Stuttgart. There, as Managing Director he was responsible for the turnkey delivery of utility steam generators for electricity-generating fossil-fuel power stations. (BP)

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news-3756 Wed, 03 Feb 2021 13:00:00 +0100 Expertise in demand: Substantial GSI/FAIR participation in international review article on the origin of the heaviest elements https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3756&cHash=fefb3cd493f797c0811a86f1ebbede26 Where and how does nature produce noble metals such as gold and platinum? This is one of the most exciting questions in physics. Astrophysical observations were able to unveil this mystery only a few years ago. The worldwide attention was immense; the interest in the topic has grown strongly since then. A group of top-class experts now evaluated and summarized the current state of knowledge and presented a review article in the renowned scientific journal "Reviews of Modern Physics". More than half of the Where and how does nature produce noble metals such as gold and platinum? This is one of the most exciting questions in physics. Astrophysical observations were able to unveil this mystery only a few years ago. The worldwide attention was immense; the interest in the topic has grown strongly since then. A group of top-class experts now evaluated and summarized the current state of knowledge and presented a review article in the renowned scientific journal "Reviews of Modern Physics". More than half of the authors are researchers at GSI/FAIR or have close connections here.

The place of origin of the heavy and heaviest elements, which include gold and platinum, has long occupied the scientific community. The U.S. National Research Council had listed this question as one of the eleven biggest unsolved problems in physics in the 21st century. A breakthrough came in August 2017, when a previously never observed astrophysical phenomenon was detected by both gravitational waves and a burst of light (known as a kilonova). Analysis of the gravitational waves showed that the observed event could be identified as the merger of two neutron stars, while the light curve gave evidence for the production of heavy elements in the so-called astrophysical r-process.

The r-process, a sequence of neutron capture reactions and beta decays by extremely neutron-rich nuclei, has been postulated as the origin of the heavy elements for a long time, but now a location where this occurs in the universe is finally known. The identification of neutron star mergers as an astrophysical site of the r-process has thus opened the door to a fascinating new field of scientific research that is attracting considerable global attention. This is one of the reasons why the prestigious scientific journal "Reviews of Modern Physics", published by the American Physical Society, invited a group of experts to comprehensively summarize and evaluate the latest knowledge on the formation of the heavy elements. Among the eight authors are three researchers working at GSI and two others closely associated with GSI/FAIR.

"It was, of course, a great honor to provide a review of this rapidly evolving field of research for ‘Reviews of Modern Physics’. Especially, it was a challenge to present in a balanced way the wide spectrum from astrophysical observations to nuclear and atomic physics laboratory measurements and simulations of such events. I am glad that competent colleagues from the different disciplines supported me with their expertise," says Professor Friedrich-Karl Thielemann, who also conducts research at GSI since his retirement from the University of Basel and who was recently awarded the Karl Schwarzschild Medal of the German Astronomical Society not least for his pioneering work on the r-process.

However, Thielemann also emphasizes that there are still many unresolved questions about the r-process, which the review also addresses. This particularly concerns the nuclear processes that are essential in the fusion of neutron stars as well as in r-process nucleosynthesis. Exciting findings can be expected here once new large-scale accelerator facilities have begun operation. At FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, which is currently being built at GSI as an international accelerator project, matter can be compressed to extreme densities and temperatures in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions and studied under conditions that exist in neutron star mergers just before the transition to a black hole.

"At FAIR, we will also produce many of the exotic nuclei for the first time and measure their properties at the storage rings and detectors available there," says co-author Gabriel Martinez-Pinedo, head of the GSI theory department and professor at TU Darmstadt. Professor Martinez-Pinedo had led with Brian Metzger of Columbia University the team that predicted the kilonova signal as a fingerprint of the r-process several years before it was observed.

Until now, the properties of the short-lived nuclei, which are important in the r-process, had to be modeled theoretically, which is always associated with a certain degree of uncertainty. Another co-author, Professor Michael Wiescher from Notre Dame University, who is connected to GSI through a prestigious Humboldt Research Award, is working on changing this in the future. Together with other researchers, primarily from Goethe University Frankfurt and GSI, Wiescher is developing plans to use the unique storage rings at FAIR to generate important experimental data for the r-process. “I am fascinated by the idea of my colleague Professor René Reifarth from Frankfurt, that the FAIR rings will make it possible to measure neutron captures at short-lived nuclei," Wiescher points to a long-held dream of nuclear astrophysics that could come true at FAIR. The FAIR storage rings also promise first-time access to measuring atomic physics data from heavy element ions, as needed to model the kilonova light curve.

The review article appears in the new volume 93 (February 1, 2021) of “Reviews of Modern Physics". Because of the actuality and complexity of the subject, the editors have allowed the page limit to be significantly exceeded. The text summarizes in 85 pages what is currently known about the formation of the heavy elements by the astrophysical r-process. However, it also shows which questions are still unsolved and what progress can be expected from improved astronomical observations, from computer simulations, and above all from the unique possibilities opened up by the next generation of accelerator facilities in Europe, America, and Asia.

The scientists involved are looking to the future: "When another review article on the r-process will appear in the ‘Reviews of Modern Physics’ in a decade or two, it will probably answer many of today's unanswered questions on the basis of the knowledge now described. But surely, as is typical and fruitful for science, it also will identify new open questions." (BP)

Further information

Scientific publication in the journal „Reviews of Modern Physics“

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3754 Mon, 01 Feb 2021 11:39:00 +0100 New digital offer: GSI and FAIR invite to online visits https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3754&cHash=20c04db1af8daa6fd6d2256f2f81f6eb The GSI Helmholtzzentrum and the future accelerator center FAIR start the New Year with an exciting new digital offer: Beginning in February, special online visits will be organized. The live moderated events offer a comprehensive insight into current research and the experimental facilities at GSI/FAIR and allow questions to be asked and discussed in real time. Also included is an exclusive view at the mega construction site for the future accelerator center FAIR, one of the largest construction projects The GSI Helmholtzzentrum and the future accelerator center FAIR start the New Year with an exciting new digital offer: Beginning in February, special online visits will be organized. The live moderated events offer a comprehensive insight into current research and the experimental facilities at GSI/FAIR and allow questions to be asked and discussed in real time. Also included is an exclusive view at the mega construction site for the future accelerator center FAIR, one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide. The first three dates are February 12, 18 and 23.

Due to the Corona situation, no public tours with on-site presence on the campus and the viewpoint of the construction site can currently be offered. Therefore, GSI and FAIR want to give all interested persons the opportunity to continue visiting us virtually and interactively with this specially compiled online offer. The new digital format adapts the guided tour offer, which has been in high demand for many years, to new times. A live event is organized, each lasting 90 minutes and offering the opportunity to ask individual questions, answered by the presenters.

After a short introductory lecture, a guided video tour will take the participants to several selected research sites and facilities on campus: Among other things, the participants can visit the 120-meter-long linear accelerator UNILAC or the main control room online and learn a lot about the unique research at GSI and FAIR. There are also interesting facts about the construction of components for the international accelerator center FAIR, currently being built at GSI.

A highlight of the new offer is the online premium place directly at the mega construction site FAIR: From the viewpoint there, participants can enjoy an impressive video panorama of the always-busy construction site and an impressive insight into the future of international cutting-edge research, which will be carried out there. With FAIR, researchers from all over the world will be able to produce and study cosmic matter directly in the laboratory and thus unravel unsolved secrets about the structure and evolution of the universe.

Detailed information on technical requirements and access modalities to participate in the digital discovery tour into the world of GSI and FAIR is available at www.gsi.de/en/besichtigung. Registration for the event dates is not necessary. Up to 500 people can participate. Further questions about the new online offer can be sent by e-mail to besichtigung(at)gsi.de. (BP)

Further Information

All details about the new online visits

Dates: 12.02.2021, 10:00, 18.02.2021, 15:00 and 23.02.2021, 13:00

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news-3742 Thu, 28 Jan 2021 08:24:00 +0100 First long multiplet for FAIR Super Fragment Separator in the test stand https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3742&cHash=3bca56b38e9b758dedada7ac8de998fc The first long multiplet for the superconducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) of the new FAIR accelerator, produced by the company ASG Superconductors in Italy, was delivered to the test stand at the European research center CERN in Switzerland. A cooperation agreement exists between GSI/FAIR and CERN for the testing of accelerator magnets, under which the multiplet will undergo a series of detailed quality tests before delivery to Darmstadt. The first long multiplet for the superconducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) of the new FAIR accelerator, produced by the company ASG Superconductors in Italy, was delivered to the test stand at the European research center CERN in Switzerland. A cooperation agreement exists between GSI/FAIR and CERN for the testing of accelerator magnets, under which the multiplet will undergo a series of detailed quality tests before delivery to Darmstadt.

A total of nine superconducting single magnets are integrated into the multiplet, and it is a real heavyweight: It is seven meters long, has a diameter of 2.5 meters and weighs over 60 tons (video of the magnet). Accordingly, the delivery to CERN was made by means of a heavy goods transport on a low loader. Following installation in the test stand, the multiplet will be cooled and subjected to extensive testing of operating parameters and magnetic field qualities, which is expected to take about six to nine months. After successful completion of the acceptance tests, the multiplet is to be transported to GSI and prepared for the subsequent tunnel installation as part of a pre-assembly. Until the final installation, the multiplet and also its successors will be temporarily stored.

The multiplets are later used in the Super-FRS to guide and shape the beam to achieve a high-precision particle beam. The Super-FRS of the future FAIR accelerator center is an important component of the overall facility with great discovery potential for science: This part of the accelerator complex is about experiments with extremely rare exotic nuclei in the framework of FAIR’s experimental pillar NUSTAR (Nuclear Structure, Astophysics and Reactions). For this purpose, ions of the heaviest elements are initially accelerated onto a material sample (target) and crushed by the impact. Among the resulting fragments are exotic nuclei, which are sorted out at the Super-FRS and made available for further experiments. With the new separator nuclei up to uranium can be produced at relativistic energies, monoisotopically separated and analyzed. Since this entire process takes only a few hundred nanoseconds, the Super-FRS allows access to very short-lived nuclei.

The multiplets produced in La Spezia, Italy, as well as the subsequent test procedure, are an important contribution (in-kind) of GSI to the FAIR project. GSI is the main German shareholder in the international FAIR GmbH. All superconducting magnets required for the Super-FRS will be tested in the new test facility at CERN in alternating sequence. This includes both the total of 32 multiplett units as well as 24 superconducting dipole magnets, which are needed for deflecting the particle beam. A first short multiplet had already been delivered to CERN in 2019, used for commissioning of the first of a total of three test stands. In the meantime, the acceptance test of the short multiplet was successfully completed despite difficult conditions due to the corona pandemic. Currently, the second test stand is being commissioned with the multiplet in preparation for series testing of all multiplets. From spring of this year, further multiplet deliveries are planned at approximately monthly intervals. (BP/CP)

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news-3748 Tue, 26 Jan 2021 08:09:00 +0100 Change of course on the journey to the island of stability https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3748&cHash=2e48ee96544e98a4b95857eafcc489e9 An international research team succeeded in gaining new insights into the artificially produced superheavy element flerovium, element 114, at the accelerator facilities of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the leadership of Lund University in Sweden and with significant participation of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) as well as the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) in Germany and other partners, flerovium was produced and investigated. Joint press release of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, in collaboration with Lund University

An international research team succeeded in gaining new insights into the artificially produced superheavy element flerovium, element 114, at the accelerator facilities of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the leadership of Lund University in Sweden and with significant participation of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) as well as the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) in Germany and other partners, flerovium was produced and investigated to determine whether it has a closed proton shell. The results suggest that, contrary to expectations, flerovium is not a so-called "magic nucleus". The results were published in the journal Physical Review Letters and additionally highlighted with a synopsis by the American Physical Society.

In the late 1960s, Sven-Gösta Nilsson, then a physics professor at Lund University, and others formulated a theory about the possible existence of still unknown superheavy elements. In the meantime, such elements have been created and many predictions have been confirmed. The discovery of the six new elements 107 to 112 was achieved at GSI in Darmstadt, and further ones up to element 118 are now known as well. Strongly increased half-lives for the superheavy elements due to a "magic" combination of protons and neutrons were also predicted. This occurs when the shells in the nucleus, each holding a certain number of protons and neutrons, are completely filled. "Flerovium, element 114, was also predicted to have such a completed, 'magic' proton shell structure. If this were true, flerovium would lie at the center of the so-called 'island of stability’, an area of the chart of nuclides where the superheavy elements should have particularly long lifetimes due to the shell closures," explains Professor Dirk Rudolph of Lund University, who is the spokesperson of the international experiment.

Atomic nuclei of flerovium show unusual decay channels

Nilsson's theories inspired the international collaboration led by the Lund group to investigate whether flerovium nuclei indeed exhibit the predicted magical properties. Their experiments, performed at the UNILAC accelerator at GSI in Darmstadt in the framework of the FAIR Phase 0 experimental program, lasted 18 days. Every second, four trillion calcium-48 nuclei with 20 protons were accelerated to ten percent of the speed of light. They irradiated a thin foil containing rare plutonium-244 with 94 protons to produce atomic nuclei of flerovium, which has 114 protons, by nuclear fusion. This so-called target was produced at the Department of Chemistry at JGU, using, plutonium provided, among others, by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Strong magnets of the GSI recoil separator TASCA separated the flerovium nuclei from the intense calcium ion beam; subsequently they were registered in a detector setup specifically developed in Lund for this experiment.

The detector measured the radioactive decay of 30 flerovium nuclei — i.e., the emission of nuclear fragments of flerovium — with high efficiency and accuracy. By precisely analyzing these fragments and their emission times, the team was able to determine unusual decay channels of flerovium nuclei that could not be reconciled with its originally predicted "magical" properties. "Our study shows that element 114 is no more stable than others in its vicinity. This is a very important piece of the puzzle in the continued search for the center of the coveted island of stability," said Professor Christoph Düllmann, professor of nuclear chemistry at JGU and head of the research groups at GSI and HIM.

The new results will be of great benefit to science. Instead of continuing to search for the center of the island of stability in the region of element 114, even heavier ones like the as yet undiscovered element 120, will now move into the spotlight. (CP)

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news-3746 Thu, 21 Jan 2021 07:34:00 +0100 Helium nuclei at the surface of heavy nuclei discovered https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3746&cHash=2a3a732fc1c512c64de7b63110887ff3 Scientists are able to selectively knockout nucleons and preformed nuclear clusters from atomic nuclei using high-energy proton beams. In an experiment performed at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) in Osaka in Japan, the existence of preformed helium nuclei at the surface of several tin isotopes could be identified in a reaction. The results confirm a theory, which predicts the formation of helium clusters in low-density nuclear matter and at the surface of heavy nuclei. This news is based on a press release by the Technical University Darmstadt.

Scientists are able to selectively knockout nucleons and preformed nuclear clusters from atomic nuclei using high-energy proton beams. In an experiment performed at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) in Osaka in Japan, the existence of preformed helium nuclei at the surface of several tin isotopes could be identified in a reaction. The results confirm a theory, which predicts the formation of helium clusters in low-density nuclear matter and at the surface of heavy nuclei. A research team, lead by scientists from TU Darmstadt and the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy-Ion Research, and from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, discuss the new findings in a contribution to the latest issue of the journal “Science”.

The strong interaction binds neutrons and protons together to atomic nuclei. The knowledge of properties of nuclei and their theoretical description is basis for our understanding of nuclear matter and the development of the universe. Laboratory-based studies of reactions between atomic nuclei provide means to explore nuclear properties. These experiments allow to test and verify theories that describe properties of extended nuclear matter at different conditions, as present, for instance, in neutron stars in the universe.

Several theories predict the formation of nuclear clusters like helium nuclei in dilute nuclear matter. This effect is expected to occur at densities significantly lower than saturation density of nuclear matter, as present in the inner part of heavy nuclei. A theory developed in Darmstadt by Dr. Stefan Typel predicts that such a condensation of helium nuclei should also occur at the surface of heavy nuclei. Goal of the experiment, which is presented in the latest issue of “Science”, was the verification of this prediction.

Prediction confirmed

The present experiment bombarded tin isotopes with high-energy protons and detected and identified the scattered protons as well as knocked-out helium nuclei. Dr. Junki Tanaka and Dr. Yang Zaihong could demonstrate that the reaction occurs as a direct “quasi-elastic” scattering of the protons off preformed helium nuclei in the surface of tin nuclei. The extracted cross sections for different tin isotopes reveal a decrease of the formation probability with the neutron excess of the nuclei, which impressively confirms the theoretical prediction.

This new finding, which has far-reaching consequences for our understanding of nuclei and nuclear matter, will now be studied in more detail in experimental programs planned at RCNP, and in inverse kinematics at RIKEN and the new FAIR facility at GSI, where also unstable heavy neutron-rich nuclei are accessible. (CP)

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news-3744 Mon, 18 Jan 2021 08:34:00 +0100 Limits of atomic nuclei predicted https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3744&cHash=7585481fdd27d2de61792bccf08936e5 Novel calculations have enabled the study of nearly 700 isotopes between helium and iron, showing which nuclei can exist and which cannot. In an article published in Physical Review Letters, scientists report how they simulated for the first time using innovative theoretical methods a large region of the chart of nuclides based on the theory of the strong interaction. The ExtreMe Matter Institure EMMI of GSI and TU Darmstadt is also involved in the research efforts. This news is based on a press release of Technical University Darmstadt.

Novel calculations have enabled the study of nearly 700 isotopes between helium and iron, showing which nuclei can exist and which cannot. In an article published in Physical Review Letters, scientists from TU Darmstadt, the University of Washington, the Canadian laboratory TRIUMF, and the University of Mainz report how they simulated for the first time using innovative theoretical methods a large region of the chart of nuclides based on the theory of the strong interaction. The ExtreMe Matter Institure EMMI of GSI and TU Darmstadt is also involved in the research efforts.

Atomic nuclei are held together by the strong interaction between neutrons and protons. About ten percent of all known nuclei are stable. Starting from these stable isotopes, nuclei become increasingly unstable as neutrons are added or removed, until neutrons can no longer bind to the nucleus and “drip” out. This limit of existence, the so-called neutron “dripline”, has so far been discovered experimentally only for light elements up to neon. Understanding the neutron dripline and the structure of neutron-rich nuclei also plays a key role in the research program for the future accelerator facility FAIR at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt.
In a new study, “Ab Initio Limits of Nuclei,” published in the journal Physical Review Letters as an Editors‘ Suggestion with an accompanying synopsis in APS Physics, EMMI Professor Achim Schwenk of TU Darmstadt and a Max Planck Fellow at the MPI for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, together with scientists from the University of Washington, TRIUMF and the University of Mainz, succeeded in calculating the limits of atomic nuclei using innovative theoretical methods up to medium-mass nuclei. The results are a treasure trove of information about possible new isotopes and provide a roadmap for nuclear physicists to verify them.

The new study is not the first attempt to theoretically explore the extremely neutron-rich region of the nuclear landscape. Previous studies used density functional theory to predict bound isotopes between helium and the heavy elements. Professor Schwenk and colleagues, on the other hand, explored the chart of nuclides for the first time based on ab initio nuclear theory. Starting from microscopic two- and three-body interactions, they solved the many-particle Schrödinger equation to simulate the properties of atomic nuclei from helium to iron. They accomplished this by using a new ab initio many-body method – the In-Medium Similarity Renormalization Group –, combined with an extension that can handle partially filled orbitals to reliably determine all nuclei.

Starting from two- and three-nucleon interactions based on the strong interaction, quantum chromodynamics, the researchers calculated the ground-state energies of nearly 700 isotopes. The results are consistent with previous measurements and serve as the basis for determining the location of the neutron and proton driplines. Comparisons with experimental mass measurements and a statistical analysis enabled the determination of theoretical uncertainties for their predictions, such as for the separation energies of nuclei and thus also for the probability that an isotope is bound or does not exist (see figure).

The new study is considered a milestone in understanding how the chart of nuclides and the structure of nuclei emerges from the strong interaction. This is a key question of the DFG-funded Collaborative Research Center 1245 “Nuclei: From Fundamental Interactions to Structure and Stars” at the TU Darmstadt, within which this research was conducted. Next, the scientists want to extend their calculations to heavier elements in order to advance the input for the simulation of the synthesis of heavy elements. This proceeds in neutron-rich environments in the direction of the neutron dripline and occurs in nature when neutron stars merge or in extreme supernovae. (TUD/CP)

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news-3740 Thu, 14 Jan 2021 11:00:00 +0100 New longterm drone video: The progress on the FAIR construction site in a time lapse https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3740&cHash=d00275302098893edd4b85fe980b8c49 Great progress has been made and important stages are completed within the FAIR project, one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide. A new time lapse video created with a sophisticated filming technique makes particularly tangible these developments on the mega construction site during the last three years. Several videos, recorded with regular drone flights over the site, were superimposed precisely with GPS support and thus combined to one single video. Great progress has been made and important stages are completed within the FAIR project, one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide. A new time lapse video created with a sophisticated filming technique makes particularly tangible these developments on the mega construction site during the last three years. Several videos, recorded with regular drone flights over the site, were superimposed precisely with GPS support and thus combined to one single video. The progress of the construction activities can be experienced in an impressive way with this "Longterm Dronelapse".

One of the biggest milestones of recent times is the development of the southern construction site. Despite the corona pandemic, construction work there could start after the awarding of the contract for excavation and shell construction for the first part in the southern area. The construction work includes the shell constructions for six buildings and a unique experimental facility – the Superconducting Fragment Separator (Super FRS). It will focus on research topics concerning the nuclear structure and interactions of extremely rare, exotic particles.

Meanwhile, the shell construction for the heart of the future facility, the 1.1-kilometer ring accelerator SIS100, is progressing steadily. The excavation work for the entire length of the tunnel is completed. The central transfer building is expanding over several floors. It is the most complex building of the facility, up to 17 meters deep and 20 meters high, and the central hub for the facility’s beamline. The civil underground work is also completed and the structural engineering is in full progress.

Furthermore, the foundation and walls for the future experiment CBM are completed. CBM is one of the four research pillars of the FAIR accelerator facility. The focus is on the investigation of highly compressed baryonic matter, as it exists in neutron stars and in the center of supernova explosions. An important step is reached in the central connection of the future accelerator FAIR and the existing facilities of GSI. As planned, a crucial connecting piece was delivered by heavy-duty transport. The 4.5-ton steel component was put in with a mobile crane. It will provide sealing the connection between GSI and FAIR.

To fill the newly constructed buildings with life, another important task gets increasingly into focus: the assembly of the accelerator machine. Regarding the development and manufacturing of high-tech components for FAIR, series production is already completed in some parts, while in others this is about to happen. A specially installed planning group will prepare this next phase in project realization, while the accelerator structures and buildings on the FAIR construction site continue to take shape. Up-to-date drone footage will continue to accompany this substantial progress also in the future. (BP)

Video

FAIR Construction Site Time Lapse – Longterm Dronelapse

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3738 Thu, 07 Jan 2021 07:53:00 +0100 Series production of SIS100 accelerator cavities, power amplifiers and power supply units completed — All components delivered https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3738&cHash=e1a2412d608320a7b6ca2539da341b7a The heavy ion accelerator SIS100 with a circumference of 1.1 kilometers is the heart of the future accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), which is currently being built at GSI. In the future, it will accelerate the heaviest ions to their maximum velocity within half a second. All the necessary cavities, power amplifiers and power supply units have now been delivered to GSI/FAIR. This completes the series production of the SIS100 main acceleration systems. The heavy ion accelerator SIS100 with a circumference of 1.1 kilometers is the heart of the future accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), which is currently being built at GSI. In the future, it will accelerate the heaviest ions to their maximum velocity within half a second. All the necessary cavities, power amplifiers and power supply units have now been delivered to GSI/FAIR. This completes the series production of the SIS100 main acceleration systems.

The fast acceleration time of the SIS100 is a major difference compared to other superconducting synchrotrons, in particular the large collider synchrotrons, whose acceleration ramp typically takes several minutes. To enable this, SIS100 is equipped with a large number of high-frequency accelerator units. For the initial commissioning, 14 cavities were planned and ordered for the acceleration of the heavy ions; in the final configuration, 20 cavities will be needed. In addition to the radio-frequency systems for beam acceleration, SIS100 has another nine cavities for compression of the accelerated ion pulses and four other special systems. The latter are used on the one hand to stabilize the beam at high intensities and on the other hand to create radiofrequency barriers that enclose a rectangular beam pulse prior to extraction. With this equipment of high-frequency systems, the straight lines of SIS100 are more like a linear accelerator than a synchrotron.

The design and construction of the accelerating cavities was contracted to RI Research Instruments GmbH. A design phase, in which RI worked closely with specialists from GSI's Ring RF department, was followed by the production and acceptance of the first-of-series system. Based on the results of these activities, manufacturing of the 13 series systems, consisting of cavities and power amplifiers, started last fall. At the same time, the associated power supply units were produced in Switzerland by RI's cooperation partner, Ampegon Power Electronics AG, now part of the Aretè & Cocchi Technology Group.

In the beginning of December, the final components for the SIS100 acceleration system were delivered by RI. As a result, all components of the procurement — 14 cavities and power amplifiers each from RI and 14 power supply units from Ampegon — have now arrived at GSI/FAIR. Together with the "low level RF", the electronic system for control and synchronization, they form the acceleration system of the SIS100 synchrotron, which can generate a total peak acceleration voltage of 280 000 volts at the ceramic gaps of the cavities.

Production and acceptance testing faced unexpected challenges in early 2020 due to the corona pandemic, but thanks to shift work, flexible customization, and, most importantly, close cooperation among the teams at GSI/FAIR, RI, and Ampegon, the activities were successfully completed despite the difficult circumstances. In addition to the completion of the series production of the superconducting dipole modules, another important milestone for the construction of the SIS100 synchrotron has thus been reached. (CP)

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news-3736 Tue, 22 Dec 2020 16:05:53 +0100 Obituary of Professor Akito Arima https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3736&cHash=2c4b3d6fc97055d17fd4ac386918faea Former President of the Japanese Research Institute RIKEN Professor Akito Arima passed away on 6 December at the age of 90. In addition to his outstanding contributions to science, his achievements for RIKEN's international relations will be a lasting legacy. During his presidency from 1993 to 1998, he essentially strengthened the cooperation between GSI and RIKEN (Tokyo). The management of GSI/FAIR sends heartfelt condolences to his family and friends. Former President of the Japanese Research Institute RIKEN Professor Akito Arima passed away on 6 December at the age of 90. In addition to his outstanding contributions to science, his achievements for RIKEN's international relations will be a lasting legacy. During his presidency from 1993 to 1998, he essentially strengthened the cooperation between GSI and RIKEN (Tokyo). The management of GSI/FAIR sends heartfelt condolences to his family and friends.

Professor Akito Arima contributed significantly to the development of the research landscape in Japan as a nuclear physicist and as a politician and held a lot of important positions over many years. During his term as RIKEN President, he focused on intensifying RIKEN's international relations. During this time, the long-standing, successful cooperation between GSI and RIKEN was significantly deepened through his support.

In addition to his work at RIKEN, he also served as president of the University of Tokyo, president of the Japan Association of National Universities, Minister of Education, and Minister of State for Science and Technology. In these various roles, he made great contributions to the development of science and technology. He received numerous prizes and awards for his services. Additionally, he was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Besides his outstanding achievements in science and science policy making, Akito Arima was also a highly respected authority in haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry. (LW)

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news-3732 Mon, 21 Dec 2020 12:00:00 +0100 FAIR-GSI PhD Award 2020 for Dr. Ivan Miskun https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3732&cHash=20bf8820c37ae5b5a4e47bcba919623f Dr. Ivan Miskun has been honored with the FAIR-GSI PhD Award 2020. The recognition, which is awarded annually, is endowed with 1000 euros donated by Pfeiffer Vacuum. The award was handed over in December during a virtual FAIR-GSI colloquium by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Director of FAIR and GSI, and Daniel Sälzer, Managing Director of Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH. Dr. Ivan Miskun has been honored with the FAIR-GSI PhD Award 2020. The recognition, which is awarded annually, is endowed with 1000 euros donated by Pfeiffer Vacuum. The award was handed over in December during a virtual FAIR-GSI colloquium by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Director of FAIR and GSI, and Daniel Sälzer, Managing Director of Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH.

Ivan Miskun's PhD thesis on "A Novel Method for the Measurement of Half-Lives and Decay Branching Ratios of Exotic Nuclei with the FRS Ion Catcher" was carried out at the University of Giessen in the research group of Professor Christoph Scheidenberger. The key element of this novel application is a so-called gas-filled stopping cell, which — this is the new development — is used as an ion trap with different storage times for the exotic nuclei produced and separated at the GSI fragment separator FRS.

The exotic nuclei are stopped in the gas-filled stopping cell of the FRS ion trap and stored for a certain variable period of time ranging from a few milliseconds to a few seconds. If during this time the unstable nuclei decay into different daughter nuclides in the ground state or into their excited levels, these are also stored and can subsequently be detected, identified (by highly accurate determination of their respective nuclear binding energies) and their intensity ratios be determined together with the remaining parent nuclei using a multireflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Metastable excited states (isomers) can also be detected and their excitation energies be precisely measured.

In his dissertation, Dr. Miskun verified that the method works reliably on several known examples, and furthermore he was able to determine the branching ratios for the energetically possible decay channels. This novel method can be used to determine a wide range of data that play a role in astrophysical nucleosynthesis processes, especially in the r-process in which fast neutron capture reactions in supernova explosions or neutron star mergers form all elements above iron up to the heaviest chemical elements within a few seconds.

GSI has a long-standing partnership with Pfeiffer Vacuum GmbH, producer of vacuum technology and pumps. Vacuum solutions from Pfeiffer Vacuum have been successfully used in GSI's facilities for decades. The annual FAIR-GSI PhD Award honors the best PhD thesis completed during the previous year.

Eligible for nominations are dissertations that were financially supported by GSI as part of its strategic partnerships with the universities of Darmstadt, Frankfurt, Giessen, Heidelberg, Jena, and Mainz, or through the research and development program. In the framework of the Graduate School HGS-HIRe (Helmholtz Graduate School for Hadron and Ion Research), more than 300 PhD students currently perform research for their PhD theses on topics closely related to GSI and FAIR. (CP)

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news-3734 Mon, 21 Dec 2020 09:49:00 +0100 Fellowship of the Chinese Academy of Sciences for Danyal Winters https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3734&cHash=38b0d26638f4dc47a1db061779b41327 GSI scientist Danyal Winters was awarded a Fellowship of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this context, he received an invitation to spend several months of research in China within two years. At the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) in Lanzhou, he will research on the field of laser cooling of stored relativistic ions and further intensify the already successful collaboration between GSI and IMP. GSI scientist Danyal Winters was awarded a Fellowship of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this context, he received an invitation to spend several months of research in China within two years. At the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) in Lanzhou, he will research on the field of laser cooling of stored relativistic ions and further intensify the already successful collaboration between GSI and IMP.

The Visiting Scientist Fellowship for Associate Professors will allow Danyal Winters to conduct research in Professor Xinwen Ma's group at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP, Lanzhou) within 2021 to 2022. The prestigious award under the President's International Fellowship Initiative (PIFI) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) is a special funding program to enable talented foreign researchers to engage in scientific exchange and research collaboration in China.

Danyal Winters is the deputy head of the storage rings department at GSI and FAIR, work package leader "SIS100 laser cooling pilot facility" and work group coordinator "laser cooling" of the SPARC collaboration (APPA). At IMP, he will extend his research in the field of laser cooling and fluorescence diagnosis of stored relativistic ions at the Cooler Storage Ring (CSRe). He will use new detector and laser systems developed in the long-standing collaboration between IMP and GSI together with other groups at German universities (Darmstadt, Dresden, Münster). The FAIR project is also strengthened by this research exchange: further developments in laser cooling are significant for the FAIR accelerator SIS100 and the SPARC collaboration, of which the Chinese researchers are also active members. (LW)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3730 Mon, 14 Dec 2020 09:00:00 +0100 Site Acceptance Test: Important detector part for FAIR experiment pillar CBM successfully handed over https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3730&cHash=a823e45123a1d35e3d042b08784ea81a An important component for the future CBM experiment, one of the four central pillars of the FAIR research program, has successfully performed the Site Acceptance Test (SAT) on the GSI/FAIR campus. On behalf of a team from the Nuclear Physics Institute (NPI) of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS) and from the Czech Technical University in Prague (CTU), Dr. Petr Chudoba (NPI) handed over the manipulator for PSD detector, an in-kind contribution for FAIR. An important component for the future CBM experiment, one of the four central pillars of the FAIR research program, has successfully performed the Site Acceptance Test (SAT) on the GSI/FAIR campus. On behalf of a team from the Nuclear Physics Institute (NPI) of the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS) and from the Czech Technical University in Prague (CTU), Dr. Petr Chudoba (NPI) handed over the manipulator for PSD detector, an in-kind contribution for FAIR. For CBM, this is the first in-kind contribution of a foreign partner delivered to Germany.

The Czech Republic is a partner state of the FAIR project and joined FAIR as an "Aspirant Partner" in spring 2019. At that time, the partnership could already build on a long-standing and very good working cooperation between Czech research institutions and GSI/FAIR. Czech scientists are involved, for example, in the large detector HADES as well as in nuclear astrophysics and are active in all four FAIR research pillars, including CBM. Here, they are significantly contributing to research, development and construction of the PSD detector (Projectile Spectator Detector), which is part of the experimental setup of CBM.

The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is one of the key experiments at FAIR and aims to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high baryon densities. The focus is on the investigation of highly compressed nuclear matter, as it exists in neutron stars and in the center of supernova explosions, with unprecedented precision and over a very wide density range. The Projectile Spectator Detector (PSD) serves for measuring the geometry of heavy ion collisions at the CBM experiment. The now delivered component, the manipulator, is the movable part of this detector.

PSD will be able to detect particles from the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with a target. Therefore, it will be located at a distance of about 8 to 12 meters from the interaction point around beam pipe. As the beam pipe is movable, also the detector has to be movable in several directions as well as able to rotate in the range of several degrees. The weight of PSD is about 25 tons, so it was a demanding task to design and build a corresponding support frame, the PSD manipulator.

The Czech team successfully achieved this complex requirement. The manipulator of PSD now allows horizontal and vertical movement with the precision of millimeters as well as rotation of the whole PSD detector. After installation, it will be able to support about 25 tons of calorimeter modules. After successful testing, the detector part is stored at GSI/FAIR until installation in the CBM cave. (BP)

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news-3728 Wed, 09 Dec 2020 17:00:00 +0100 CERN experiment: ALICE opens avenue for high-precision studies of the strong force https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3728&cHash=8a0d02bac81e9469e80a214063ad95ce It is the entry in a new chapter in hadron physics: In a paper published today in the Journal “Nature”, the ALICE collaboration at the European Research Center CERN describes a technique that opens a door to many new high-precision studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the dynamics of the strong force between hadrons. From the beginning, GSI has played a leading role in the construction and scientific program of ALICE, one of the largest experiments at CERN. It is the entry in a new chapter in hadron physics: In a paper published today in the Journal “Nature”, the ALICE collaboration at the European Research Center CERN describes a technique that opens a door to many new high-precision studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the dynamics of the strong force between hadrons. From the beginning, GSI has played a leading role in the construction and scientific program of ALICE, one of the largest experiments at CERN.

With the publication "Unveiling the strong interaction among hadrons at the LHC" the ALICE collaboration presents interesting new findings about hadrons and their interactions. Hadrons are composite particles made of two or three quarks bound together by the strong interaction, which is mediated by gluons. This interaction also acts between hadrons, binding nucleons (protons and neutrons) together inside atomic nuclei. One of the biggest challenges in nuclear physics today is understanding the strong interaction between hadrons with different quark content from first principles, that is, starting from the strong interaction between the hadrons’ constituent quarks and gluons.

Calculations known as lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) can be used to determine the interaction from first principles, but these calculations provide reliable predictions only for hadrons containing heavy quarks, such as hyperons, which have one or more strange quarks. In the past, these interactions were studied by colliding hadrons together in scattering experiments, but these experiments are difficult to perform with unstable (i.e. rapidly decaying) hadrons such as hyperons. This difficulty has so far prevented a meaningful comparison between measurements and theory for hadron–hadron interactions involving hyperons.

Enter the new study from the collaboration behind ALICE, one of the main experiments at the LHC. The study shows how a technique based on measuring the momentum difference between hadrons produced in proton–proton collisions at the LHC can be used to reveal the dynamics of the strong interaction between hyperons and nucleons, potentially for any pair of hadrons. The technique is called femtoscopy because it allows the investigation of spatial scales close to 1 femtometre (10−15 metres) – about the size of a hadron and the spatial range of the strong-force action.

This method has previously allowed the ALICE team to study interactions involving the Lambda (Λ) and Sigma (Σ) hyperons, which contain one strange quark plus two light quarks, as well as the Xi (Ξ) hyperon, which is composed of two strange quarks plus one light quark. In the new study, the team used the technique to uncover with high precision the interaction between a proton and the rarest of the hyperons, the Omega (Ω) hyperon, which contains three strange quarks.

“The precise determination of the strong interaction for all types of hyperons was unexpected,” says ALICE physicist Laura Fabbietti, professor at the Technical University of Munich“. This can be explained by three factors: the fact that the LHC can produce hadrons with strange quarks in abundance, the ability of the femtoscopy technique to probe the short-range nature of the strong interaction, and the excellent capabilities of the ALICE detector to identify particles and measure their momenta”.

The nuclear physicist Professor Peter Braun-Munzinger, Scientific Director of the ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI at GSI and longstanding chair of the collaboration board of ALICE, is significantly involved in the current investigations. He also emphasizes the importance of the now published research: “Out findings open the door to a new chapter in hadron physics, and with the factor 100 increase in statistics for the coming Run3 and Run4 at the LHC many new investigations will be possible”.

The relationship between GSI and ALICE is traditionally very close: GSI's research department ALICE shares responsibility for the operation of ALICE's two largest detector systems. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) were designed and built with significant contribution of GSI’s ALICE department and Detector Laboratory. Currently, GSI gives an essential contribution to the ALICE upgrade program, specifically in the TPC project and in the development of the new Online-Offline (O2) software framework. To do this, GSI’s ALICE department, Detector Laboratory and IT department work closely together. GSI scientists have several leading roles in data analysis and in the physics program of ALICE. GSI scientist and professor at Heidelberg University, Silvia Masciocchi currently chairs the ALICE Collaboration Board.

“Our new measurement allows for a comparison with predictions from lattice QCD calculations and provides a solid testbed for further theoretical work,” says ALICE spokesperson Dr. Luciano Musa. “Data from the next LHC runs should give us access to any hadron pair”. He concludes: “ALICE has opened a new avenue for nuclear physics at the LHC – one that involves all types of quarks”. (CERN/BP)

Further information

Scientific publication „Unveiling the strong interaction among hadrons at the LHC" in the journal Nature

The ALICE experiment at CERN

ALICE at GSI

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news-3726 Mon, 07 Dec 2020 14:31:09 +0100 Obituary for Professor Vladimir Fortov https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3726&cHash=d50e53cd6a7407e62a015c2af9863772 The world has lost an outstanding and devoted scientist, which has left a legacy in science and particularly strengthened GSI and the FAIR project through his staunch support. The GSI/FAIR management is saddened by the news that academician Vladimir Fortov passed away on 29 November 2020 and sends heartfelt condolences to his family and friends. The world has lost an outstanding and devoted scientist, which has left a legacy in science and particularly strengthened GSI and the FAIR project through his staunch support. The GSI/FAIR management is saddened by the news that academician Vladimir Fortov passed away on 29 November 2020 and sends heartfelt condolences to his family and friends.

He was a renowned researcher in the fields of thermal physics, shock waves, and plasma physics, with a particular focus on energy generation. As such, he held a lot of important positions in Russia, e.g., as director of the Institute of High-Temperature Physics, Research Minister and member and president of the Russian Academy of Sciences. At the same time, he fostered international relations and received many international awards and recognitions. For his contribution to the partnership with German universities, the Max-Planck society and the Helmholtz association, he received the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany in 2006 and among the honorary PhDs he received one was awarded to him by the University of Frankfurt. Despite his workload, he was a regular visitor and supporter of GSI/FAIR and served on its committees for a long period.

Vladimir Fortov was a key figure in our scientific field, a warm-hearted and reliable partner for GSI/FAIR and a good friend. We will miss him very much! (GSI/FAIR)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3724 Mon, 07 Dec 2020 10:00:00 +0100 Promoting young scientists: GSI/FAIR and JINR establish joint international school https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3724&cHash=4a508358618dbec97b8371fd7e9a5f16 It is a strong signal for the future: GSI/FAIR and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) are promoting young talents in international cooperation and therefore jointly establish the "International Joint FAIR/GSI-JINR School". Representatives of both institutions have now concluded a corresponding agreement. It is a strong signal for the future: GSI/FAIR and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) are promoting young talents in international cooperation and therefore jointly establish the "International Joint FAIR/GSI-JINR School". Representatives of both institutions have now concluded a corresponding agreement.

The very good collaboration between GSI and JINR has a long tradition and includes science and technology at the existing accelerator and experimental facilities of both partners as well as research and development activities for the two accelerator centers FAIR and NICA, currently being built at GSI in Darmstadt and at JINR in Dubna. The new school shall cover the current and future scientific programs and its high quality offer is addressed to young participants from all member states of GSI/FAIR and JINR/NICA.

The school is organized alternately once a year for a period of 10 to 14 days in Germany or Russia or one of the FAIR or JINR member states. It offers 40 to 50 PhD students the unique opportunity to immerse themselves in the research areas and technological developments at FAIR/GSI and JINR, especially in the topics Hadron and Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, Plasma Physics, Materials Research, Biophysics and Radiation Medicine, Accelerator Physics, Detector Research and Development, Micro/Nano-Electronics, Information Technology and High-Performance Computing and more. Thus, the young scientists will learn about the entire scientific and technological scope of the research programs pursued at FAIR/GSI and JINR.

Professor Paolo Giubellino was enthusiastic about the new cooperation and underlined the importance of scientific education: "The school will offer excellent opportunities and open up promising new perspectives. That is essential. Because the students from today are the FAIR scientists of tomorrow. With our new offer, we will attract the researchers of the future. Moreover, the new offer will further strengthen the close and very good cooperation between the two institutes in Darmstadt and Dubna".

The "International FAIR/GSI-JINR School" benefits from the experience of both institutions with such offers, for example the „joint Helmholtz-Rosatom Schools dedicated to FAIR physics“ and several „International FAIR-Schools“. The new project will bring together excellent young students and familiarize them with FAIR/GSI and JINR research and technologies. As the experiences from the existing offers show, students and lecturers highly appreciate this multidisciplinary structure.

The International FAIR/GSI-JINR School combines excellent pedagogical lectures given by international GSI, FAIR, and JINR experts with workshop sessions where the students will solve problems and tackle projects in the presence of the lecturers. Participants are selected based on individual applications and recommendation letters by their scientific supervisors. The focus will lie also on getting a good mix of nationalities in order to foster consistently more international collaboration. The offer aims at PhD students, who will be able to gain concentrated experience in small groups with direct feedback from their supervisors and will get a full overview far beyond their own field of research.

Professor Giubellino stressed, “This, together with the very open discussion culture of the event, leads to discussions across the border of research groups, disciplines and countries. We jointly promote new talents, bring together young people from all over the world and even in COVID times go forward in a focused way building the future”.

In their agreement, the two partner institutions emphasize, “Especially in today’s environment of a more and more global world, the competence to discuss, collaborate and cooperate within international teams will become increasingly more important. The community of scientists always has been on the forefront of global partnership and will continue to do so”. The "International Joint FAIR/GSI-JINR School" will make an important contribution to this. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3722 Mon, 30 Nov 2020 08:42:00 +0100 Lecture series „Wissenschaft für Alle“ by GSI and FAIR goes digital https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3722&cHash=b7f8f9d3e63f2b83e6918fba78033ebf As part of corona prevention, GSI and FAIR decided in March to suspend the lectures of the series “Wissenschaft für Alle” until further notice. Since the lecture events can still not be held on the campus, a digital offer is now taking their place. Starting December, the speakers will offer their lectures as video conferences. Interested parties can join in via a dial-in link using a web-enabled device. As part of corona prevention, GSI and FAIR decided in March to suspend the lectures of the series “Wissenschaft für Alle” until further notice. Since the lecture events can still not be held on the campus, a digital offer is now taking their place. Starting December, the speakers will offer their lectures as video conferences. Interested parties can join in via a dial-in link using a web-enabled device such as a laptop, smartphone or tablet.

As a prelude, Professor Thomas Walther of the Technical University of Darmstadt with his lecture “Das ‚Quanten‘ in Quantenkryptographie – na und?” will report on the use of quantum mechanical effects as a component of cryptographic procedures. Further lectures in the first half of 2021 will then focus on space: Astronaut Thomas Reiter (ESA) will report on the exploration of space. So not only the "universe in the laboratory" in the experiments at FAIR, GSI and at ALICE at the research center CERN, but also the moon and gravitational waves will be the subject of the lectures. A short topical excursion leads into the cold and to superconductivity for FAIR's accelerator magnets.

The lectures start at 2 p. m., further information about access and the course of the event can be found on the event website at www.gsi.de/wfa

The lecture series “Wissenschaft für Alle” is aimed at all persons interested in current science and research. The lectures report on research and developments at GSI and FAIR, but also on current topics from other fields of science and technology. The aim of the series is to prepare and present the scientific processes in a way that is understandable for laypersons in order to make the research accessible to a broad public. The lectures are held by GSI and FAIR staff members or by external speakers from universities and research institutes. (CP)

Further information

Website of lecture series "Wissenschaft für Alle" (German)

Current program
  • Wednesday, 9.12.2020, 2 p.m.
    Das ‚Quanten‘ in Quantenkryptographie – na und?
    Thomas Walther, Technische Universität Darmstadt
     
  • Wednesday, 20.01.2021, 2 p.m.
    Das Weltall im Labor – Kosmische Strahlung am Teilchenbeschleuniger und Strahlenschutz für Astronauten
    Ulrich Weber, GSI
     
  • Wednesday, 24.02.2021, 2 p.m.
    Was uns elektromagnetische Strahlung über den Zustand sichtbarer Materie unter extremen Bedingungen verrät
    Tetyana Galatyuk, GSI/ Technische Universität Darmstadt
     
  • Wednesday, 17.03.2021, 2 p.m.
    Die Bedeutung des Mondes – unter besonderer Berücksichtigung von Snoopy
    Marc Hempel, Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron DESY
     
  • Wednesday, 21.04.2021, 2 p.m.
    Exploration des Weltraums – Aktuelle Höhepunkte und zukünftige Entwicklungen
    Thomas Reiter, European Space Agency ESA
     
  • Wednesday, 12.05.2021, 2 p.m.
    Kühlschrankmagnete mal anders: die supraleitende Teilchenoptik von FAIR (mit einem Vorwort von Hans Christian Oerstedt)
    Christian Roux, GSI
     
  • Wednesday, 16.06.2021, 2 p.m.
    Mit Gravitationswellen das Universum belauschen
    Andreas Bauswein, GSI
     
  • Wednesday, 14.07.2021, 2 p.m.
    Eine Reise zum Urknall – Untersuchung von Schwerionenkollisionen mit dem ALICE-Experiment
    Ralf Averbeck, GSI
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Presse Aktuelles
news-3720 Fri, 27 Nov 2020 09:00:00 +0100 PANDA Collaboration honors PhD: Theory Prize for Dr. Antoni Woss https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3720&cHash=53ab2cfa408eebc6fe153aadd5374fa2 Dr. Antoni Woss has been honoured with the PANDA Theory PhD Prize 2020 for his doctoral thesis at the University of Cambridge. The award was presented at the most recent Online PANDA Collaboration Meeting. Physicist Antoni Woss received the prize of €200 and a certificate for her dissertation titled "The scattering of spinning hadrons from lattice QCD". Dr. Antoni Woss has been honoured with the PANDA Theory PhD Prize 2020 for his doctoral thesis at the University of Cambridge. The award was presented at the most recent Online PANDA Collaboration Meeting. Physicist Antoni Woss received the prize of €200 and a certificate for her dissertation titled "The scattering of spinning hadrons from lattice QCD". His doctoral advisor was Professor Dr. Christopher Thomas from the University of Cambridge.

The PANDA Collaboration has awarded the Theory PhD Prize for the second time in order to honor the best theory dissertation written in connection with the PANDA Experiment and its science program. PANDA will be one of the key experiments of the future accelerator center FAIR. The experiment focuses on antimatter research as well as on various topics related to the weak and the strong force, exotic states of matter, and the structure of hadrons. More than 450 scientists from 18 countries currently work in the PANDA Collaboration. In his dissertation, Dr. Woss developed and then applied state-of-the-art lattice QCD methods to determine precisely the properties and interactions of hadronic resonances - a very important topic for the PANDA physics program. Candidates for the Prize are nominated by their doctoral advisors.

In addition to being directly related to the PANDA Experiment, the nominees’ doctoral degrees must have received a rating of “very good” or better. Up to three candidates are shortlisted for the award and can present their dissertations at the PANDA Collaboration meeting. The winner is chosen by a committee that is appointed for this task by the PANDA Collaboration. The PANDA Collaboration awards the Theory PhD Prize to specifically honor students’ contributions to the PANDA project and to highlight the importance of cooperation with theory groups. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3716 Wed, 25 Nov 2020 08:22:00 +0100 Expedition to the world of elementary particles — Virtual Masterclass with GSI/FAIR at Schuldorf Bergstraße https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3716&cHash=8f257e6f5425f4240a9a1fb7a8f5ea49 How was the universe created? What are we made of? What does the "world machine" at CERN investigate? These were the questions that science enthusiasts were able to pursue during the “Week of the Particle World” (Woche der Teilchenwelt) from November 2 to 8, 2020. All over Germany, the locations of Netzwerk Teilchenwelt invited visitors to explore research in the field of particle and astroparticle physics. GSI and FAIR also took part in an online Masterclass. How was the universe created? What are we made of? What does the "world machine" at CERN investigate? These were the questions that science enthusiasts were able to pursue during the “Week of the Particle World” (Woche der Teilchenwelt) from November 2 to 8, 2020. All over Germany, the locations of Netzwerk Teilchenwelt invited visitors to explore research in the field of particle and astroparticle physics. GSI and FAIR also took part in an online Masterclass for the analysis of measurement data from the CERN experiment ALICE, which was conducted together with the “AG MINT-Zentrum” at the school Schuldorf Bergstraße.

30 science locations, including GSI and FAIR, have joined forces to form the Netzwerk Teilchenwelt (engl. Network Particle World). For this year's tenth anniversary of the network, the participating research institutions combined a particularly large number of events and presented the entire spectrum of research — from Higgs particles and neutrinos to black holes and supernovae as gigantic particle catapults.

GSI and FAIR participated in an online Masterclass on November 5 and 6 to analyze measurement data from particle collisions of the ALICE experiment. Seven students of the AG MINT-Zentrum at Schuldorf Bergstraße took part in the virtual event. In addition to data analysis, the program included an exchange with other Masterclass groups via video conference as well as a virtual tour of the ALICE experimental site. ALICE is one of CERN's four large-scale experiments and in particular investigates heavy-ion collisions of lead atomic nuclei. From the very beginning GSI has played a major role in the construction and operation of ALICE.

About 200 researchers are active in Netzwerk Teilchenwelt. Their aim is to inspire young people and teachers with their enthusiasm for particle physics and to get them excited about MINT subjects. To this end, they offer project days in schools, student laboratories or museums throughout the year. As particle physicists, the young people can spend a day analyzing real data from CERN, tracking down particles from outer space or discussing the origins and structure of the universe with scientists. Workshops and project weeks for particularly interested students take place at CERN in Geneva and at research institutes in Germany.

The “Week of the Particle World” is part of the anniversary program of the German Physical Society (DPG). The world's largest physics society is the patron of Netzwerk Teilchenwelt and this year is looking back on 175 years of activity. The “Week of the Particle World” is supported by the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation.

Netzwerk Teilchenwelt is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) as part of the project KONTAKT (Communication, Attraction of Young Scientists and Participation of the General Public in Knowledge in the Field of Smallest Particles). The project management is at the TU Dresden. (Netzwerk Teilchenwelt/CP)

Further information
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3718 Mon, 23 Nov 2020 09:00:00 +0100 Two young researchers receive Christoph Schmelzer Award 2020 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3718&cHash=524028a554095fe2bf6df3e08dd50fb0 This year, the Christoph Schmelzer Award goes to two young female scientists: The medical physicist Dr. Alina Bendinger from the German Cancer Research Center DKFZ Heidelberg and the engineer Dr. Giorgia Meschini from the biomedical department of the State Polytechnic University in Milan (Politecnico di Milano) receive the prize in recognition of their doctoral theses. With this award, the Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy with Heavy Ions e.V. annually honors outstanding master's and doctoral This year, the Christoph Schmelzer Award goes to two young female scientists: The medical physicist Dr. Alina Bendinger from the German Cancer Research Center DKFZ Heidelberg and the engineer Dr. Giorgia Meschini from the biomedical department of the State Polytechnic University in Milan (Politecnico di Milano) receive the prize in recognition of their doctoral theses. With this award, the Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy with Heavy Ions e.V. annually honors outstanding master's and doctoral theses in the field of tumor therapy with ion beams. The traditional award ceremony on the GSI/FAIR campus in Darmstadt was postponed until next year due to current restrictions.

In her dissertation at DKFZ Heidelberg, Dr. Alina Bendinger established various imaging techniques to characterize the oxygenation status in experimental tumors and to quantify their response to irradiation with carbon ions in comparison to photons. The oxygen supply of tumors is of great importance, since an oxygen deficiency, which often prevails in tumors, makes the cancer resistant to radiation therapy. Dr. Bendinger has contributed decisive methodological improvements. For example, she has extended the evaluation of photoacoustic imaging from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional procedure. This allows a substantially improved characterization of the heterogeneity of oxygen supply in tumors. In addition, she has developed a new method to improve the dynamic, contrast-agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and validated it with extensive simulations. The results obtained with the new imaging methods have also been validated by extensive histological examinations.

In her doctoral thesis, Dr. Giorgia Meschini has developed sophisticated, model-based strategies for the analysis of respiration-induced movements in particle therapy. These movements can lead to undesired distortions of the dose distribution, which need to be taken into account in treatment planning and compensated by appropriate mitigation procedures. For this purpose, Dr. Meschini used the time-resolved 4D magnetic resonance imaging (4D-MRI) method to convert movement information into virtual 4D computed tomography (4D-CT) data using a special procedure. The 4D-CT is the basis for the precise determination of the range of ion beams inside the body during the various phases of respiration or movement. Furthermore, she has developed modeling approaches that allow the estimation of respiratory movements even at times that are not explicitly captured by the imaging procedures. This allows in particular the analysis of irregular respiratory processes. Finally, Dr. Meschini used these approaches to investigate the effects of respiratory movement on dose distribution and proposed an improved definition of the target volume, which leads to a greater robustness of irradiation plans with respect to movement artifacts.

The prize money is 1500 Euro each. The promotion of young scientists in the field of tumor therapy with ion beams has meanwhile been continuing for many years, and the award, named after Professor Christoph Schmelzer, the co-founder and first Scientific Director of GSI, was presented for the 22nd time. The topics of the award-winning theses are of fundamental importance for the further development of ion beam therapy and often find their way into clinical application.

The Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy supports research activities in the field of tumor therapy with heavy ions with the aim of improving the treatment of tumors and making it available to general patient care. At the accelerator facility at GSI, more than 400 patients with tumors in the head and neck area were treated with ion beams as part of a pilot project from 1997 to 2008. The cure rates of this method are sometimes over 90 percent and the side effects are very low. The success of the pilot project led to the establishment of clinical ion beam therapy centers in Heidelberg and Marburg, where patients are now regularly treated with heavy ions. (BP)

Further information

Association for the Promotion of Tumor Therapy with Heavy Ions e.V.

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3714 Sat, 21 Nov 2020 12:30:00 +0100 Saturday Morning Physics 2020 — Virtual event with GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3714&cHash=e166a08cc911b06b41a9f7a5d2296ef6 The popular event series “Saturday Morning Physics” was also held in 2020, but due to the corona pandemic in a purely virtual format. Around 200 high-school students from all over the State of Hesse took the opportunity to participate and gain exciting insights into current physics research. The long-standing series organized by the Technical University of Darmstadt also included the traditional visit of GSI and FAIR on November 21, 2020, this time, however, on video. The popular event series “Saturday Morning Physics” was also held in 2020, but due to the corona pandemic in a purely virtual format. Around 200 high-school students from all over the State of Hesse took the opportunity to participate and gain exciting insights into current physics research. The long-standing series organized by the Technical University of Darmstadt also included the traditional visit of GSI and FAIR on November 21, 2020, this time, however, on video.

On four dates this year, the participants attended the lectures of “Saturday Morning Physics” via video conference. Today, they had the opportunity to learn more abut the facilities and research at GSI and to gain an insight into the construction of components and buildings for the future international research facility FAIR. After a short introductory lecture, they were taken via a guided video tour to the linear accelerator UNILAC, the main control room, the heavy ion synchrotron SIS18, the storage ring ESR, the tumor therapy and the large-scale experiment HADES. There was also a virtual visit to the test facility for superconducting FAIR magnets and to the viewpoint of the FAIR construction site. A drone flight over the construction site rounded off the event. Questions and comments could be submitted via a chat function and answered live, which was very well received by the students.

The event series “Saturday Morning Physics” is a project of the Physics Faculty of the TU Darmstadt. It takes place annually and aims to strengthen the interest of young people in physics. In lectures and experiments on consecutive Saturdays, the students learn about current developments in physics research at the university. Those who take part in all events receive the “Saturday Morning  Physics” diploma. GSI has been one of the sponsors and supporters of the project since the start of the event series. (CP)

Further information
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3712 Thu, 19 Nov 2020 09:00:00 +0100 Laser physicist Dr. Jan Rothhardt from the Helmholtz Institute Jena receives Röntgen Prize https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3712&cHash=9a03a7f7f9cdf3fd7d7f91422070060e The laser physicist Dr. Jan Rothhardt from the Helmholtz Institute Jena (HI Jena), an institute of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, located on the campus of the Friedrich Schiller University (FSU) Jena, receives the renowned Röntgen Prize. The prize will be awarded during the digital academic ceremony of the Justus-Liebig-University Gießen. The 39-year-old leader of a Helmholtz Young Investigator Group, who works at HI Jena and the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, receives the award The laser physicist Dr. Jan Rothhardt from the Helmholtz Institute Jena (HI Jena), an institute of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, located on the campus of the Friedrich Schiller University (FSU) Jena, receives the renowned Röntgen Prize. The prize will be awarded during the digital academic ceremony of the Justus-Liebig-University Gießen. The 39-year-old leader of a Helmholtz Young Investigator Group, who works at HI Jena and the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, receives the award in recognition of his outstanding contributions in the field of laser technology, in particular for the development and application of laser sources for extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation and soft X-ray radiation.

Dr. Jan Rothhardt intensively conducts research in applications of these laser systems and was able to show both mathematically and experimentally for the first time that efficient conversion into the XUV spectral range is also possible with high-power lasers of high pulse repetition frequency. The XUV sources developed by him were already successfully used for high-resolution lensless imaging processes. In addition to applications in nanotechnology, these methods in future should also be able to track ultra-fast processes on the nanoscale, which are the basis of future data memories.

Furthermore, the new XUV sources will enable worldwide unique laser spectroscopy experiments on heavy ion storage rings. Quantum electrodynamics (QED), relativistic effects, but also nuclear properties and ultrafast processes are at the center of these interdisciplinary experiments. First pioneering experiments were already realized at the CRYRING in Darmstadt. CRYRING is one of the storage rings in the unique portfolio of traps and storage facilities for heavy ions of the future accelerator center FAIR, currently under construction at GSI.

Dr. Rothhardt studied physics in Jena and received his doctorate in 2011. Since 2014, the internationally renowned laser physicist is leader of a junior research group at the Helmholtz Institute Jena and author and co-author of almost 70 publications in scientific journals. He regularly receives excellent student evaluations for his lectures and seminars at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena. In addition, he is engaged in inspiring school students for laser technology with a special experimental lecture at schools.

In memory of Nobel Prize winner Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, who was a professor in Giessen from 1879 to 1888, Justus Liebig University Giessen (JLU) has been awarding the renowned Röntgen Prize since 1960. It is endowed with prize money of € 15,000, which is jointly donated by Pfeiffer Vacuum and the Ludwig Schunk Foundation. This year there will be a "hands-on" prize for the first time: To mark the Röntgen Year, JLU and the founders initiated the production of a miniature of the famous Gießen Röntgen monument.

JLU traditionally gives the Röntgen Prize winners the opportunity to present their research area in a public lecture event on the eve of the Academic Ceremony. Due to the corona pandemic, the prizewinner will not travel to Gießen this year. The Röntgen lecture with the title "High-resolution lensless microscopy with extreme ultraviolet radiation" will take place on Thursday, November 26, 2020, as a Webex stream. At the digital academic ceremony on the following Friday, November 27, Dr. Rothhardt will be connected via video. (BP)

Dates

Röntgen lecture (digital): Thursday, November 26, 2020, 6 p.m. via Webex Meeting identification number/access code: 174 043 9232, Meeting passwort: uvUbY3Fqz53

Akademic ceremony with award ceremony (digital): Friday, November 27, 2020, 10.30 a.m. via Livestream

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3708 Mon, 16 Nov 2020 12:27:00 +0100 Understanding astrophysics with laser-accelerated protons https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3708&cHash=e7340d0ddb51ad2b434a7e8f277bbb9a Bringing huge amounts of protons up to speed in the shortest distance in fractions of a second — that's what laser acceleration technology, greatly improved in recent years, can do. An international research team has succeeded in using protons accelerated with the GSI high-power laser PHELIX to split other nuclei and to analyze them. The results could provide new insights into astrophysical processes. Bringing huge amounts of protons up to speed in the shortest distance in fractions of a second — that's what laser acceleration technology, greatly improved in recent years, can do. An international research team from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Helmholtz Institute Jena, a branch of GSI, in collaboration with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA, has succeeded in using protons accelerated with the GSI high-power laser PHELIX to split other nuclei and to analyze them. The results have now been published in the journal Scientific Reports of Nature Research and could provide new insights into astrophysical processes.

For less than one picosecond (one trillionth of a second), the PHELIX laser shines its extremely intense light pulse onto a very thin gold foil. This is enough to eject about one trillion hydrogen nuclei (protons), which are only slightly attached to the gold, from the back-surface of the foil, and accelerate them to high energies. "Such a large number of protons in such a short period of time cannot be achieved with standard acceleration techniques," explains Pascal Boller, who is researching laser acceleration in the GSI research department Plasma Physics/PHELIX as part of his graduate studies. "With this technology, completely new research areas can be opened that were previously inaccessible".

These include the generation of nuclear fission reactions. For this purpose, the researchers let the freshly generated fast protons impinge on uranium material samples. Uranium was chosen as a case study material because of its large reaction cross-section and the availability of published data for benchmarking purposes. The samples have to be close to the proton production to guarantee a maximum yield of reactions. The protons generated by the PHELIX laser are fast enough to induce the fission of uranium nuclei into smaller fission products, which remain then to be identified and measured. However, the laser impact has unwanted side effects: It generates a strong electromagnetic pulse and a gammy-ray flash that interfere with the sensitive measuring instruments used for this detection.

At this stage, the researchers are assisted by the expertise of another GSI research group. For the chemical investigation of superheavy elements, a transport system has been in use for quite some time that can transport the desired particles over long distances from the reaction area to the detector. The reaction chamber is flushed through by a gas which — in the case of fission experiments — carries the fission products with it and, within only a few seconds, transports them via small plastic tubes to the measuring apparatus, which is now several meters away. In this way, generation and measurement can be spatially separated and interference can be prevented.

For the first time, it was possible in the experiments to combine the two techniques and thus to generate a variety of cesium, xenon and iodine isotopes via the fission of uranium, to reliably identify them via their emitted gamma radiation and to observe their short life time. This provides a methodology for studying fission reactions in high-density plasma-state matter. Comparable conditions can be found, for example, in space inside stars, stellar explosions or neutron star mergers. "Understanding the reaction processes of nuclei interacting with each other in plasma can give us insights into the origin of atomic nuclei, the so-called nucleosynthesis, in our universe. Nucleosynthesis processes such as s-process or r-process take place in exactly such media," explains Boller. "The role fission reactions play in these processes has not yet been researched in detail. Here, the laser-accelerated protons can provide new information".

Further measurements with the methods are planned for future experiments of the PHELIX laser at GSI as well as at other research centers around the world. The investigation of highly dense matter with ion and laser beams will also be one of the topics pursued at the future research facility FAIR. FAIR is currently being built at GSI in international cooperation. With its motto "The Universe in the Laboratory", it is intended to reproduce conditions as they occur in astrophysical environments on Earth, thus expanding the knowledge about our cosmos. (CP)

Further information
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Presse Aktuelles
news-3710 Mon, 16 Nov 2020 11:36:19 +0100 GSI and FAIR support "Your story counts” https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3710&cHash=49485120e0d1d0c1aa45d309d1961a2f On the campus of GSI and FAIR, one of the symbolic desks of the campaign "Your story counts" is located. They are supposed to raise attention in the district of Darmstadt-Dieburg for the topic of violence against women. The campaign which was initiated on the occasion of Women's Day 2020 is supported by Frauen helfen Frauen e.V., the women's home Notwaende and "Mäander - individuelle Jugendhilfe". On the campus of GSI and FAIR, one of the symbolic desks of the campaign "Your story counts" is located. They are supposed to raise attention in the district of Darmstadt-Dieburg for the topic of violence against women. The campaign which was initiated on the occasion of Women's Day 2020 is supported by Frauen helfen Frauen e.V., the women's home Notwaende and "Mäander - individuelle Jugendhilfe".

These days, symbolic desks can be seen at various locations in the Darmstadt-Dieburg district as part of the campaign "Your story counts - Letters against violence against women". They encourage people who experienced violence against women and girls to write down their story. On the campus of GSI and FAIR a desk with a mailbox is located until 18 December 2020. "We want to create awareness that violence against women happens everywhere and at all times and that behind every experience of violence there is an individual story and thus also a fate. The desk should attract attention and sharpen the view for everyday aggression and violence," says the equal opportunities committee of GSI and FAIR.

The campaign is supported by Frauen helfen Frauen e.V., the women's home Notwaende and "Mäander - individuelle Jugendhilfe". The project was inspired by the action "Cartas de Mujeres" from Quito in Ecuador, where many thousands of women addressed politics with letters and messages. The letters received at the desks in Darmstadt-Dieburg are treated in strict confidence and are only read and evaluated by employees of the project cooperation. For Women's Day 2021, the results are to be brought to public space through art initiatives. Ideas and demands to politicians are to be passed on to the local political committees. The goal is to reach as many people as possible with the campaign "Your story counts" and to initiate changes. (LW)

More Information

"Your story counts" (German only)

 

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3702 Fri, 13 Nov 2020 09:03:00 +0100 Verification of treatment plans in tumor therapy https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3702&cHash=c9b929959d0a78b5bbcab8e5234002ca In the tumor therapy with ion beams developed by GSI, so-called treatment plans are prepared prior to the treatment of individuals. Their validity is checked on models to guarantee a correct and safe procedure. The investigation of a new test option has now been published in the scientific journal "Physics in Medicine and Biology". What’s special about this: Dea Aulia Kartini and Gianmarco Camazzola, GET_INvolved participant and summer student at GSI and FAIR, are among the authors. In the tumor therapy with ion beams developed by GSI as well as in other radiation therapies, so-called treatment plans are prepared prior to the treatment of individuals. Their validity is checked on models to guarantee a correct and safe procedure. The investigation of a new test option has now been published in the scientific journal "Physics in Medicine and Biology". What’s special about this: Dea Aulia Kartini and Gianmarco Camazzola, GET_INvolved participant and summer student at GSI and FAIR, are among the authors of the publication.

Treatment plans for radiotherapy are calculated with special software. So-called phantoms are used to verify the plans. They can consist simply of water or be prepared cell cultures which are irradiated under the same conditions under which the therapy is to be performed on humans. Subsequently, it is checked how many of the cells have survived where in the cultures. This allows to assess whether the treatment plan has been optimized in the best possible way. In research, they are especially relevant to test new treatment planning strategies or optimizations before they are applied in the clinical environment. Until now, phantoms from monolayered cell cultures have been used for this purpose. The new technique makes it possible to irradiate three-dimensional cell volumes.

“Instead of allowing the cells to grow flat, we place them into three-dimensional containers. For this we use multiwell plates, a standard accessory from laboratory supplies, with 96 wells — these are the small indentations that are on the plates,” explains Dea Aulia Kartini, who is in charge of the experiment. “They are first filled with a layer of a substance called Matrigel, then with an added cell and Matrigel mixture, and then sealed again with another layer of Matrigel. In this way we make sure that there really is a volume of cells inside”. Kartini, who originally comes from Indonesia and is studying in Thailand, is currently writing her PhD thesis and this is her third visit to GSI and FAIR in the framework of the GET_INvolved Programme. The program promotes international exchange for students and researchers and supports their education and career.

“Our experiments show that the new phantoms work flawlessly and could improve the verification of treatment plans in the future", Kartini adds. Further experiments with 3D phantoms are planned in the near future both at GSI and in cooperation with the Marburger Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum MIT.

The publication also features the name of Gianmarco Camazzola, who came to GSI and FAIR in 2019 as part of the Summer Student Program, where he spent eight weeks gaining insight into the research of the Biophysics Department. The Summer Student Program is aimed at international students before graduation and allows them to get a taste of the research at GSI and FAIR independently from the universities. During his stay, he mainly worked on software modeling for the experiments at the 3D phantoms. Currently he has also returned to the GSI/FAIR campus within the GET_INvolved Programme. The publication clearly shows the success and the importance of the student and scientific exchange programs, which give the participants an early insight and entry into the research community. (CP)

Weitere Informationen
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3706 Wed, 11 Nov 2020 09:00:00 +0100 Dr. Walter Ikegami Andersson receives the PhD Award of the PANDA Collaboration https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3706&cHash=279f499af115e76565103fd32a7c3821 Dr. Walter Ikegami Andersson has received the PANDA PhD Prize 2020 for his doctoral thesis at GSI, FAIR, and the University Uppsala. The award was announced by the spokesperson of the PANDA Collaboration, Klaus Peters from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, at the most recent Online PANDA Collaboration meeting. Dr. Walter Ikegami Andersson has received the PANDA PhD Prize 2020 for his doctoral thesis at GSI, FAIR, and the University Uppsala. The award was announced by the spokesperson of the PANDA Collaboration, Klaus Peters from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, at the most recent Online PANDA Collaboration meeting.

Physicist Walter Ikegami Andersson received the prize of €200 and a certificate for his dissertation titled "Exploring the Merits and Challenges of Hyperon Physics with PANDA at FAIR". His doctoral advisor was Professor Dr. Karin Schönning from the Uppsala University.

The Panda Collaboration has awarded the PhD Prize once per year since 2013 in order to honor the best dissertation written in connection with the PANDA experiment. PANDA will be one of the key experiments of the future accelerator center FAIR. The experiment focuses on antimatter research as well as on various topics related to the weak and the strong force, exotic states of matter, and the structure of hadrons. More than 450 scientists from 18 countries currently work in the PANDA Collaboration. In his dissertation, Dr. Andersson studied the production and study of hyperons - baryons with at least one strange quark - which is an important research program at the PANDA detector, which is being built at the FAIR accelerator facility.

Candidates for the PhD Prize are nominated by their doctoral advisors. In addition to being directly related to the PANDA Experiment, the nominees’ doctoral degrees must have received a rating of “very good” or better. Up to three candidates are shortlisted for the award and can present their dissertations at the PANDA Collaboration meeting. The winner is chosen by a committee that is appointed for this task by the PANDA Collaboration. The PANDA Collaboration awards the PhD Prize to specifically honor students’ contributions to the PANDA project. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3703 Mon, 09 Nov 2020 09:24:27 +0100 Perspectives of tumor treatment: Researchers investigate combination of carbon ion and immunotherapy https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3703&cHash=70f0bd3b26b5b3e2f52ee5441448578e It is still a glance into the future: The combination of carbon ion and immune therapy could become an effective tool in the fight against cancer. Promising results for the potential benefit of this treatment combination have now been published in the renowned radiation therapy journal "International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics" of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). The authors are an international team of researchers, led by the Department of Biophysics at It is still a glance into the future: The combination of carbon ion and immune therapy could become an effective tool in the fight against cancer. Promising results for the potential benefit of this treatment combination have now been published in the renowned radiation therapy journal "International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics" of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). The authors are an international team of researchers, led by the Department of Biophysics at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, and including the Parthenope University of Naples and the Japanese National Institute for Radiological Sciences (NIRS-QST) in Chiba.

Even though the results are only preclinical and the way to clinical application is still long, the current findings point into a promising direction: It was shown that carbon ions, as used in the cancer therapy developed at GSI, can be very effective when used in combination with specific molecules, called checkpoint blockers, that stimulate the immune system against the tumor metastases.

The aim of the published research work was to compare the efficacy of conventional radiation therapy (high-energy X-rays) and carbon ion therapy in combination with immunotherapy. The immune system plays an important role in the prevention of cancer. Usually, it recognizes degenerated cells and can “sort them out". At the same time, it is equipped with highly complex control mechanisms to avoid overreactions. This is exactly what cancer cells can sometimes use to their advantage and to down-regulate immune surveillance. They disappear from the radar, so to speak. Immunotherapy can reactivate the immune system in the fight against cancer. It is now frequently used for advanced malignancies and metastatic patients, but unfortunately is effective only in some tumor types.

In the other cases, conventional radiation therapy is added as a second component, which under certain conditions can release such brakes on the immune system. The radiation-induced triggering of an immune response and its amplification by immunotherapy can lead to good results especially in the control of metastases, such as a slowdown of growth. But only parts of the patients respond to this combination of therapies.

Can radiotherapy with carbon ions, which was developed very successfully at GSI and is now in clinical application in Heidelberg and Marburg and in other nine centers worldwide, for certain types of tumors, open up new perspectives and help to control metastasis? It is possible that this form of therapy is more immunogenic, i.e. it could trigger an even stronger immune response than conventional radiation therapy and, together with immunotherapy, might result in more patients responding to this therapy combination. Based on such considerations, the team with lead author Dr. Alexander Helm (GSI) in the current experiment, conducted at the accelerator in Chiba, Japan, for the first time has directly compared carbon ions with conventional X-rays in a mouse model.

In the control of the primary tumor (here osteosarcoma, a bone tumor), carbon ions and X-rays, each combined with immunotherapy, produced similar results. However, when looking at the growth of metastases, the results show that metastases are significantly reduced if the primary tumor is treated with carbon ion radiation and a following immunotherapy. The researchers were able to demonstrate that carbon ions plus immunotherapy is more effective in controlling lung metastases than both therapies alone and more effective than X-rays plus immunotherapy.

In order to better assess this potential, further research has to be conducted and finally, together with international partners, the application in clinical studies must be tested. Professor Marco Durante, head of the GSI Biophysics Research Department, explained the future research: “At GSI/FAIR, the focus of our research is on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that trigger a strong immune response. The goal is to answer the central question: How should irradiation be applied to achieve the most efficient, the best immune response in the fight against cancer.”

The possibilities of combining cutting-edge molecular biology with high-energy heavy ion physics at the GSI/FAIR campus and the future accelerator center FAIR promise unique scientific knowledge. The Scientific Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, emphasized "The present results show the great potential of carbon ion therapy, which is far from being exhausted. Together with our national and international partners, we will continue to conduct research on this highly relevant topic in the coming years. The first stage of the FAIR experimental program, FAIR Phase 0, already offers outstanding opportunities in this field". (BP)

Further information

Scientific publication in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3700 Fri, 06 Nov 2020 09:00:00 +0100 Next steps for the FAIR ring accelerator: From production to installation https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3700&cHash=e77f6a5c86d02d3bbd1012c1f938f9f9 The next decisive milestones for the FAIR ring accelerator SIS100 are set: While the structural work on the construction site is progressing and the development and production of the high-tech components for the future FAIR accelerator center is running simultaneously, another crucial aspect is now moving more and more into focus: the assembly of the accelerator machine in the new buildings. The next decisive milestones for the FAIR ring accelerator SIS100 are set: While the structural work on the construction site is progressing and the development and production of the high-tech components for the future FAIR accelerator center is running simultaneously, another crucial aspect is now moving more and more into focus: the assembly of the accelerator machine in the new buildings.

Although the current focus is still on the procurement of accelerator components, the first important steps towards machine assembly are currently being taken. The SIS100/SIS18 project group, consisting of the work package leaders, representatives of international providers and the subproject management, had placed their latest three-day closed meeting under the motto "From production to installation". Representatives of the new subproject "Site Management SMG" were also involved with the aim of jointly preparing the next phase of the project realization.

In which sequences should the installation of the machine take place? What is the best sequence for assembling the accelerator components? How will the heavy parts be moved to their correct position in the new buildings? These are just a few of the questions to be answered with high precision. The focus is on the production of ready-to-install assemblies, the construction and testing of a complete SIS100 unit cell consisting of two dipole, two quadrupole and several correction magnets, the development of transport and lifting equipment and the consideration of technology-specific boundary conditions when defining installation sequences. In addition, other important milestones such as the completion of the technical building services (TGA), the completion of central facilities, the delivery dates and the readiness for installation of all accelerator components must be included in the planning.

Special attention is given to cryogenics. The ring accelerator SIS100 requires superconducting magnets to guide the extremely fast particles. Superconductivity can only be achieved with sophisticated cryotechnology: It has to constantly maintain a cryogenic temperature of -268.6 °C throughout the SIS100 ring system, which is required for operation.

The installation of such cryogenic systems, cryomagnetic modules and local cryogenics requires special quality assurance measures. European directives must be complied with, for example the Pressure Equipment Directive, which is applied to numerous work steps.

Therefore, the recent meeting of the project group and the new subproject also discussed ways to efficiently exploit the extended installation phase of cryogenic systems by starting the hardware commissioning of warm systems in parallel. Efficient planning for the installation and commissioning of the individual technical systems is a precondition for timely cold commissioning, as well as for the commissioning of the main power supply in conjunction with the then superconducting magnetic chain.

Overall, these complex plans are driven by a decisive goal: the realization of a first pilot beam through SIS100, the heart of the future FAIR accelerator center. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3694 Tue, 03 Nov 2020 08:42:00 +0100 Research during corona crisis — Successful experiment program of FAIR Phase 0 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3694&cHash=6b8515e68bc8918cdac24313b5cf0164 Very successful experiments, high-quality ion beams for research — the current experiment period on the GSI and FAIR campus has ended with a positive outcome despite the corona pandemic. At the existing accelerator facility researchers were able to conduct experiments with a wide variety of ion beams on numerous topics. This opened the way for new discoveries and excellent research opportunities in the future. Very successful experiments, high-quality ion beams for research — the current experiment period on the GSI and FAIR campus has ended with a positive outcome  despite the corona pandemic. At the existing accelerator facility researchers were able to conduct experiments with a wide variety of ion beams on numerous topics. This opened the way for new discoveries and excellent research opportunities in the future. Scientific operations at the modernised accelerators are part of the FAIR experimental program, the so-called "FAIR Phase 0", which already offers outstanding experimental opportunities while FAIR is still under construction.

Although the experimental program had to be restricted from March 2020 onwards due to the corona pandemic, operation could be partially continued under strict regulations according with the official requirements. Approximately two thirds of the planned experiments could be conducted. Scientists from all over the world, who usually come to the campus for the experiments, were no longer able to travel from that date. However, they supported the research program and the GSI/FAIR staff on site with advice and assistance remotely wherever possible.

In addition to the GSI facilities UNILAC (linear accelerator), SIS18 (ring accelerator), FRS (fragment separator) and ESR (experimental storage ring) as well as the existing experiment setups and the Petawatt high energy laser PHELIX, FAIR developments and detectors, measuring apparatus and other high-tech facilites specially manufactured for FAIR could already be used. Additionally, the commissioning of the first FAIR storage ring CRYRING has progressed to the point, where it is now ready for scientific experiments. Thus, the current FAIR Phase 0 scientific program already represents a major step towards future research at FAIR.

The experiments dealt with topics from a wide range of scientific disciplines, from medicine and materials research to the properties of superheavy elements and the complex structure of short-lived isotopes that play a role in element synthesis in the universe.

In a biophysics experiment, for example, it was shown for the first time that it is possible to use carbon beams to create conditions that are necessary for a so-called FLASH therapy of tumors. In FLASH therapy, a very high dose is applied in a very short time (high dose rate). Studies with proton beams have shown that this technique  reduces damage to healthy tissue while maintaining the same level of effectiveness. Until now, FLASH therapy  has only been applicable using electron and proton accelerators. Thanks to the improvements at the GSI accelerator facility as part of the preparations for FAIR, the necessary dose rate of five billion ions per 200 milliseconds can now also be achieved for carbon.

Another field of research that benefits from the increased intensities of the GSI accelerators is the study of isotopes that play a role in the synthesis of elements in the universe. Light nuclei up to iron are produced by fusion reactions in stars, heavy elements possibly in explosions of massive stars at the end of their evolution (supernova explosions) or in the collision of neutron stars, extremely compact objects that unite the mass of up to two suns in a radius of a few kilometers. The actual synthesis of elements takes place via nuclear reactions of a multitude of mostly unstable nuclei along specific reaction paths. In a dedicated experiment, extremely neutron-rich nuclei were studied that could not be produced in an accelerator laboratory until now. Isotopes with mass numbers around 200 near the magic neutron number N=126 play a crucial role in the synthesis of even heavier nuclei. Several isotopes in this range have been detected for the first time and their properties determined, among them possibly 200-tungsten. This would be the first time that such a heavy nucleus could be produced in the laboratory, which is directly on one of the element synthesis pathways.

Another experiment with a similar objective was conducted at the Experimental Storage Ring ESR using the entire accelerator chain of UNILAC, SIS18 and FRS. The importance of the bound beta decay of thallium in element formation processes has been emphasized in many scientific publications, and has now been measured for the first time.

The investigation of superheavy elements has been part of GSI's scientific portfolio for many years. In the nuclear reaction of 48Ca+244Pu (calcium and plutonium), among others, two flerovium isotopes are produced: 288Fl and 289Fl. Flerovium is an atomic nucleus with atomic number Z=114 and was first produced in 1999 in a research laboratory in Dubna. However, its nuclear structure is not yet fully understood, so the TASCA setup at GSI was used for the first time to measure alpha and photon emissions of flerovium isotopes in coincidence. In this experiment as many Flerovium isotopes were detected as in all experiments since the first detection of this nucleus.

While heavy nuclei are produced in stars, stellar explosions and the laboratory by nuclear reactions, on dust particles complex molecules are produced from simple organic ones by cosmic rays and are subsequently destroyed again. In an experiment of materials research, it could be shown that these destruction processes can be temperature-dependent and that higher temperatures possibly lead to a longer lifetime of complex molecules under the influence of cosmic radiation.

This is only a small excerpt of the scientific findings of the past experimental period. All in all, the "FAIR Phase 0" program allows a forward-looking combination of important tests of FAIR instrumentation on the one hand and high-quality experiments on the other. In this way, outstanding scientific results can be achieved and the FAIR community can be further developed. On the way to the commissioning of the FAIR accelerator center, further regular experimental periods at the existing and continuously modernized facilities are planned for the coming years. (BP/CP/YL)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3698 Mon, 02 Nov 2020 14:00:00 +0100 More than 37,000 kilometers: Again first place in the campaign City Cycling https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3698&cHash=8365fabaaae110fe6bd068294ccd67ab The cycling season is slowly coming to an ending, time for an annual balance: This year again, team GSI/FAIR has achieved a great success in city cycling campaign and has reached first place in the team ranking. A total mileage of 37,181 kilometers was covered. 142 employees from GSI, FAIR and externals participated in the campaign as team GSI/FAIR. The kilometers travelled avoided the emission of 5.5 tonnes of carbon dioxide. The cycling season is slowly coming to an ending, time for an annual balance: This year again, team GSI/FAIR has achieved a great success in city cycling campaign and has reached first place in the team ranking. A total mileage of 37,181 kilometers was covered. 142 employees from GSI, FAIR and externals participated in the campaign as team GSI/FAIR. The kilometers travelled avoided the emission of 5.5 tonnes of carbon dioxide. Second and third places were taken by "Merck fährt Rad" (36,919 kilometers) and the Darmstadt University of Applied Sciences (25,720 kilometers).

This year's result of team GSI/FAIR once again is a clear improvement on the very successful results of the last years: Already in 2019, the cyclists could reach the first place with also 142 participants and 35,049 covered kilometers. In 2018, there were 102 cyclists in the team, who had covered 25,766 kilometers, taking second place.

Traditionally, the winning prizes for the best teams and individual cyclists are presented by Barbara Akdeniz, head of the environment department of Darmstadt, during the bike action day on the market square in Darmstadt. Due to Corona, the event was cancelled this year.

More than 1980 people in 117 teams took part in the 21-day campaign in May and June. Overall, the previous year's result was significantly exceeded in Darmstadt: The participants covered a total of 420,000 kilometers, thus avoiding 62 tonnes of CO2 compared with driving a car. Environment department head Akdeniz expressed her delight that so many citizens took part in city cycling: “Our decision to run the city cycling this year in spring was a very conscious one. In addition to the possibility of being able to promote climate protection, quality of life and the mobility turnaround by participating in city cycling, cycling in times of Corona is also ideal for staying physically and mentally fit – of course within the scope of the currently valid regulations” (BP)

Further information

Website of the campaign City Cycling

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3696 Wed, 28 Oct 2020 16:28:48 +0100 Mainz University and GSI to play an important role in the EU-funded network of doctoral students for research on radioactive elements https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3696&cHash=c1b6e8831197d7b200478f9b9863d14e In the context of an international network funded by the European Union, scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) are participating in the education of young postgraduate students in the fields of nuclear and atomic physics and nuclear chemistry. The goal of this Innovative Training Network (ITN) on Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy of Actinide Elements (LISA) is to decipher the structure of actinides, i.e., the heavy, mostly short-live Joint press release by GSI, HIM and JGU

In the context of an international network funded by the European Union, scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) are participating in the education of young postgraduate students in the fields of nuclear and atomic physics and nuclear chemistry. The goal of this Innovative Training Network (ITN) on Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy of Actinide Elements (LISA) is to decipher the structure of actinides, i.e., the heavy, mostly short-lived elements at the bottom of the periodic table, and thus put in place the prerequisite for their future use in biomedical physics, in nuclear applications, and for environmental monitoring. Members of the consortium are some of the world's leading experts in fundamental atomic and nuclear physics and nuclear chemistry. The EU is supporting the LISA project for a period of four years with a total funding worth EUR 4 million.

LISA is coordinated by the CERN research center. As for Mainz University, Professor Christoph Düllmann and Professor Klaus Wendt are involved as is Professor Michael Block at GSI. "Of the 15 early-stage researchers being funded, six are expected to obtain their doctorates at JGU. We thus play a significant role within the new LISA network," said Professor Klaus Wendt. "Thanks to the highly effective collaboration between our nuclear chemistry and physics disciplines here at JGU with the Helmholtz Institute Mainz in the field of actinide research we are also expecting interesting and important results here." Wendt himself will supervise three doctoral students. This is the second time he has become involved in an EU training network.

EU Innovative Training Network (ITN) involving many national partners

In addition to the universities in Mainz, Hanover, Jena, Gothenburg in Sweden, and Leuven in Belgium, major research institutions such as CERN, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, the heavy ion accelerator Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) in France, and the accelerator facility in Jyväskylä in Finland are also participating in the ITN. There are also two commercial partners based in Kassel and Glasgow. Moreover, there are 12 other partner organizations from Canada all the way to Japan, who can contact the doctoral students for scientific exchange.

In the initial phase, Professor Christoph Düllmann's group at the JGU Department of Chemistry is to chemically purify exotic actinide isotopes that are available in sufficient quantities and are adequately stable. "We will develop techniques to then convert them to a form optimized for the intended experiments within the LISA network in Jyväskylä and at GANIL, also in Mainz and at GSI," explained Düllmann, head of the joint Superheavy Element Chemistry Group of JGU, GSI, and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM).

At GSI in Darmstadt, Professor Michael Block's group will be employing laser spectroscopy to study the heaviest actinides. These can only be produced artificially and are generally very short-lived. With the help of lasers, the optical excitation of energy levels in the elements' atomic shells will be measured in detail in order to determine their atomic and nuclear properties. "The ITN is an optimal research environment for doctoral candidates to systematically and comprehensively study these exotic actinides," said Block. The first candidate has already started her work at GSI this summer.

Manufacture and analysis of actinides using novel laser technologies

Uranium and plutonium are probably the best known actinides, but curium, einsteinium, fermium, and mendelevium also belong to this group of radioactive elements. They all are usually extremely unstable and at present can only be produced synthetically in research reactors or particle accelerators. Due to their short-lived nature, they still provide science with major puzzles. Researching them should therefore improve our understanding of their atomic and nuclear properties. Building on this, the LISA network intends to develop new laser technologies to be able to create and investigate actinides for the development of innovative applications. LISA will promote the coherent and symbiotic collaboration between the participants, which is intended to continue after the end of the project.

Due to the on-going coronavirus crisis, the doctoral students from abroad will not yet be able to begin their research in Germany. It is expected that one doctoral student from Poland and another doctoral student from Mexico, as well as candidates from Canada, UK, and the USA, who are all to be supervised in Mainz, will be able to start in late fall 2020. The team is currently planning an academic training session for all 15 doctoral students and other guests in Mainz in the fall of 2021. (JL)

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Aktuelles
news-3692 Tue, 27 Oct 2020 12:07:00 +0100 Now available: GSI and FAIR annual calendar for the year 2021 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3692&cHash=4385f7093ea652402424980ce91782b9 [Translate to English:] Der praktische Jahresplaner von GSI/FAIR erfreut sich seit vielen Jahren großer Beliebtheit. Darin sind alle gesetzlichen Feiertage und die Schulferien aufgeführt. Er bietet eine gute Übersicht über das Jahr und ist für viele eine nützliche Planungshilfe. The practical annual planner has enjoyed great popularity for many years. It lists all public and school holidays. It offers a good overview of the year and is a useful planning aid for many people.

GSI and FAIR employees can get a copy at the foyer or at the reception in Borsigstraße. If you want to order the DIN-A2-sized calendar from FAIR and GSI, please contact  gsi-kalender(at)gsi.de (Data Protection) directly via e-mail and receive the calendar by post. Please include the following information: your name, your address and the number of calendars you wish to order. We kindly ask for your understanding that because of the limited quantity a maximum of three calendars can be sent per request (while stocks last). (JL)

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news-3690 Tue, 20 Oct 2020 13:39:48 +0200 "Birthplaces" of the heaviest elements: Cluster project ELEMENTS investigates the dynamics of neutron stars https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3690&cHash=a75ddfecb2085a89df9e164d968d38a7 The ELEMENTS project combines the strong research forces of several international leading institutions. Besides the Goethe University Frankfurt as consortium leader the TU Darmstadt, the University of Gießen and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt are also involved. This news is based on a press release of TU Darmstadt

The ELEMENTS project combines the strong research forces of several international leading institutions. Besides the Goethe University Frankfurt as consortium leader the TU Darmstadt, the University of Gießen and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt are also involved.

This network gives the scientists access to unique conditions: expertise in gravitational physics and in the physics of nuclear reactions as well as infrastructure such as the accelerator facilities in Darmstadt - the accelerator center FAIR currently under construction at GSI and the S-DALINAC electron accelerator at the TU in the Institute of Nuclear Physics. In addition, the physicists want to close a gap with ELEMENTS.

As one of the main measures, the project is seeking to establish a joint Alexander von Humboldt Professorship at the universities in Frankfurt and Darmstadt. This professorship is to be dedicated to the astronomical observation of processes in and around neutron stars, a field of research that is lacking in Hesse to date and is very close to the research work honored with this year's Nobel Prize.

ELEMENTS will study neutron stars, the barely visible little brothers of black holes. They are formed after a star has burned out when it was not massive enough to be compressed into a black hole by its own gravitational pressure after its end. Neutron stars, like black holes, are the cause of extreme space-time curvature, and when neutron stars or black holes merge, detectable gravitational waves are created.

Because of their cosmic effects and extreme conditions, both phenomena are the focus of research. However, unlike black holes, neutron stars also allow glimpses into their interior and they are also "productive". For example, neutron star mergers are visible as kilonovae in the sky and are the only known objects in the universe that produce the heaviest chemical elements through nuclear reactions under extreme conditions.

The ELEMENTS project investigates the dynamics in the fusion of two neutron stars and and in this context also examines the gravitational field, nuclear matter and - the main topic of the physicists at GSI/FAIR and the TU Darmstadt - the heavy chemical elements that are created in the process. For example, the luminosity of a kilonova was successfully predicted a few years ago by physicists working in Darmstadt.

For ELEMENTS, the research consortium has applied to the state of Hesse for funding under the one-time funding line for cluster projects. This funding line is intended to provide project-related support for internationally competitive research fields at universities and university networks in order to further raise their profile and prepare them for a successful application in the next round of the excellence strategy. (TUD/BP)

 

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news-3688 Tue, 13 Oct 2020 09:38:40 +0200 Black hole or no black hole: On the outcome of neutron star collisions https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3688&cHash=cf7ec402ffcd1fd5ca615d328292c2ac A new study lead by GSI scientists and international colleagues investigates black-hole formation in neutron star mergers. Computer simulations show that the properties of dense nuclear matter play a crucial role, which directly links the astrophysical merger event to heavy-ion collision experiments at GSI and FAIR. These properties will be studied more precisely at the future FAIR facility. With the award of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics the topic currently also receives a lot of attention. A new study lead by GSI scientists and international colleagues investigates black-hole formation in neutron star mergers. Computer simulations show that the properties of dense nuclear matter play a crucial role, which directly links the astrophysical merger event to heavy-ion collision experiments at GSI and FAIR. These properties will be studied more precisely at the future FAIR facility. The results have now been published in Physical Review Letters. With the award of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics for the theoretical description of black holes and for the discovery of a supermassive object at the center of our galaxy the topic currently also receives a lot of attention.

But under which conditions does a black hole actually form? This is the central question of a study lead by the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt within an international collaboration. Using computer simulations, the scientists focus on a particular process to form black holes namely the merging of two neutron stars (simulation movie).

Neutron stars consists of highly compressed dense matter. The mass of one and a half solar masses is squeezed to the size of just a few kilometers. This corresponds to similar or even higher densities than in the inner of atomic nuclei. If two neutron stars merge, the matter is additionally compressed during the collision. This brings the merger remnant on the brink to collapse to a black hole. Black holes are the most compact objects in the universe, even light cannot escape, so these objects cannot be observed directly.

"The critical parameter is the total mass of the neutron stars. If it exceeds a certain threshold the collapse to a black hole is inevitable" summarizes Dr. Andreas Bauswein from the GSI theory department. However, the exact threshold mass depends on the properties of highly dense nuclear matter. In detail these properties of high-density matter are still not completely understood, which is why research labs like GSI collide atomic nuclei - like a neutron star merger but on a much smaller scale. In fact, the heavy-ion collisions lead to very similar conditions as mergers of neutron stars. Based on theoretical developments and physical heavy-ion experiments, it is possible to compute certain models of neutron star matter, so-call equations of state.

Employing numerous of these equations of state, the new study calculated the threshold mass for black-hole formation. If neutron star matter or nuclear matter, respectively, is easily compressible - if the equation of state is "soft" - already the merger a relatively light neutron stars leads to the formation of a black hole. If nuclear matter is "stiffer" and less compressible, the remnant is stabilized against the so-called gravitational collapse and a massive rotating neutron star remnant forms from the collision. Hence, the threshold mass for collapse itself informs about properties of high-density matter. The new study revealed furthermore that the threshold to collapse may even clarify whether during the collision nucleon dissolve into their constituents, the quarks.

"We are very excited about this results because we expect that future observations can reveal the threshold mass" adds Professor Nikolaos Stergioulas of the department of physics of the Aristotle University Thessaloniki in Greece. Just a few years ago a neutron star merger was observed for the first time by measuring gravitational waves from the collision. Telescopes also found the "electromagnetic counterpart" and detected light from the merger event. If a black hole is directly formed during the collision, the optical emission of the merger is pretty dim. Thus, the observational data indicates if a black hole was created. At the same time the gravitational-wave signal carries information about the total mass of the system. The more massive the stars the stronger is the gravitational-wave signal, which thus allows determining the threshold mass.

While gravitational-wave detectors and telescopes wait for the next neutron star mergers, the course is being set in Darmstadt for knowledge that is even more detailed. The new accelerator facility FAIR, currently under construction at GSI, will create conditions, which are even more similar to those in neutron star mergers. Finally, only the combination of astronomical observations, computer simulations and heavy-ion experiments can settle the questions about the fundamental building blocks of matter and their properties, and, by this, they will also clarify how the collapse to a black hole occurs. (CP/BP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3684 Fri, 09 Oct 2020 09:00:00 +0200 The new heavy isotope mendelevium-244 and a puzzling short-lived fission activity https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3684&cHash=fe137f027de678699b0b4df6d53d5144 Gaining a better understanding of the limiting factors for the existence of stable, superheavy elements is a decade-old quest of chemistry and physics. Superheavy elements, as are called the chemical elements with atomic numbers greater than 103, do not occur in nature and are produced artificially with particle accelerators. They vanish within seconds. A team of scientists from GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Helmholtz-Institute Mainz (HI Joint press release of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU)

Gaining a better understanding of the limiting factors for the existence of stable, superheavy elements is a decade-old quest of chemistry and physics. Superheavy elements, as are called the chemical elements with atomic numbers greater than 103, do not occur in nature and are produced artificially with particle accelerators. They vanish within seconds. A team of scientists from GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, led by Dr. Jadambaa Khuyagbaatar from GSI and HIM, has provided new insights into the fission processes in those exotic nuclei and for this, has produced the hitherto unknown nucleus mendelevium-244. The experiments were part of "FAIR Phase 0", the first stage of the FAIR experimental program. The results have now been published in the journal "Physical Review Letters".

Heavy and superheavy nuclei are increasingly unstable against the fission process, in which the nucleus splits into two lighter fragments. This is due to the ever-stronger Coulomb repulsion between the large number of positively charged protons in such nuclei, and is one of the main limitations for the existence of stable superheavy nuclei.

The nuclear fission process was discovered more than 80 years ago and is being studied intensely to this day. Most experimental data on the spontaneous fission are for nuclei with even numbers of protons and neutrons – called “even-even nuclei”. Even-even nuclei consist entirely of proton and neutron pairs and their fission properties are rather well describable by theoretical models. In nuclei with an odd number of either neutrons or protons, a hindrance of the fission process when compared to the properties of even-even nuclei has been observed and traced back to the influence of such a single, unpaired constituent in the nucleus.

However, the fission hindrance in “odd-odd nuclei”, containing both, an odd number of protons and an odd number of neutrons, is less well known. Available experimental data indicate that the spontaneous fission process in such nuclei is greatly hindered, even more so than in nuclei with only one odd-numbered type of constituents.

Once the fission probability is most reduced, other radioactive decay modes like alpha decay or beta decay become probable. In beta decay, one proton transforms into a neutron (or vice versa) and, accordingly, odd-odd nuclei turn into even-even nuclei, which typically have a high fission probability. Accordingly, if a fission activity is observed in experiments on the production of an odd-odd nucleus, it is often difficult to identify whether fission occurred in the odd-odd nucleus, or not rather started from the even-even beta-decay daughter, which can then undergo beta-delayed fission. Recently, Dr. Jadambaa Khuyagbaatar from GSI and HIM predicted that this beta-delayed fission process may be very relevant for the heaviest nuclei and – in fact – may be one of the main decay modes of beta-decaying superheavy nuclei.

In superheavy nuclei, which are exceedingly difficult to be produced experimentally, beta-decay has not yet been observed conclusively. For instance, in the case of the heaviest element produced at GSI Darmstadt, tennessine (element 117), only two atoms of the odd-odd nucleus tennessine-294 were observed in an experiment that lasted about one month. This small production rates limit the verification and detailed study of the beta-decay delayed fission process. Still, new experimental data to shed light on this process are best gained in exotic nuclei, like those which have an extremely unbalanced ratio of protons to neutrons. For this, the team from GSI, JGU, HIM and University of Jyväskylä has produced the hitherto unknown nucleus mendelevium-244, an odd-odd nucleus consisting of 101 protons and 143 neutrons.

The theoretical estimate suggests that beta decay of this nucleus will be followed by fission in about one out of five cases. Due to the large energy release of the fission process, this can be detected with high sensitivity, whereas beta decays are more difficult to measure. The researchers used an intense beam of titanium-50 available at GSI’s UNILAC accelerator to irradiate a gold target. The reaction products of titanium and gold nuclei were separated in the Transactinide Separator and Chemistry TASCA, which guided mendelevium nuclei into a silicon detector suitable to register the implantation of the nuclei as well as their subsequent decay.

A first part of the studies, performed in 2018, led to the observation of seven atoms of mendelevium-244. In 2020, the researchers used a lower titanium-50 beam energy, which is insufficient to lead to mendelevium-244 production. Indeed, signals like those assigned to mendelevium-244 in the 2018 study were absent in this part of the data set, corroborating the proper assignment of the 2018 data and confirming the discovery of the new isotope.

All of the seven registered atomic nuclei underwent alpha decay, i.e., the emission of a helium-4 nucleus, which led to the daughter isotope einsteinium-240, discovered four years ago by a preceding experiment carried out at the University of Jyväskylä. Beta decay was not observed, which allows establishing an upper limit on this decay mode of 14 percent. If the 20 percent fission probability of all beta-decaying nuclei were correct, the total probability for beta delayed fission would be at most 2.8 percent and its observation would necessitate the production of substantially more mendelevium-244 atoms than in this discovery experiment.

In addition to the alpha-decaying mendelevium-244, the researchers found signals of short-lived fission events with unexpected characteristics concerning their number, production probability, and half-life. Their origin cannot currently be pinpointed exactly, and is in fact not readily explicable with current knowledge of the production and decay of isotopes in the region of mendelevium-244. This motivates follow-up studies to get more detailed data, which will help shed further light on the fission process in odd-odd nuclei. (BP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3686 Fri, 09 Oct 2020 09:00:00 +0200 Prestigious award for Friedrich-Karl Thielemann https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3686&cHash=6a6d195b5d4b9b37085dcb81c662b781 For his research at the boundary of nuclear physics and astronomy, Friedrich-Karl Thielemann receives the Karl Schwarzschild Medal, the most prestigious prize in Germany in the field of astronomy and astrophysics. Since 2018, Thielemann has been a guest scientist at GSI after his retirement and continues his award-winning research on the origin of the elements in the universe in collaboration with his theory colleagues. This work is of great importance for the future experimental program at FAIR and ... This news is based on a press release of the Astronomische Gesellschaft e. V.

For his research at the boundary of nuclear physics and astronomy, Friedrich-Karl Thielemann receives the Karl Schwarzschild Medal, the most prestigious prize in Germany in the field of astronomy and astrophysics. Since 2018, Thielemann has been a guest scientist at GSI after his retirement and continues his award-winning research on the origin of the elements in the universe in collaboration with his theory colleagues. This work is of great importance for the future experimental program at FAIR and already for the ongoing FAIR Phase 0 program.

His theoretical efforts, combined with comparison to experiments and observations, had a huge impact on the understanding of stellar explosions. In his many outstanding theoretical contributions, he predicted nuclear cross sections and reaction rates of nuclei across the nuclear chart, including highly unstable ones. During his more than 40-year career, he achieved a full circle from nuclear input to studies of stellar evolution and explosions, the formation of heavy elements and the resulting chemical evolution of galaxies. Friedrich-Karl Thielemann excelled in providing the basis for the most extreme events in the universe from type Ia supernovae, novae and X-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae and hypernovae to neutron star mergers. Thielemann’s dedication to unravel the origin of the elements in the universe led to professional positions he held around the globe. Being emeritus professor in the field of cosmology and particle physics at the University of Basel, he continues his research also as a guest scientist at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt. Paolo Giubellino, scientific managing director of GSI and FAIR, expressed his delight at this recognition for Thielemann: “We are thrilled that this prestigious prize goes to a towering figure in Nuclear Astrophysics who has honoured our center by choosing it as his home institution in these years as Emeritus. He is an extremely active scientist, who actively collaborates with the other nuclear astrophysicists on campus, both theorists and experimentalists. It is a great asset for us, with great impact on one of the key FAIR research programs”. Thielemann is member of the German Astronomical Society since 1978. (AG/LW)

Press Release of Astronomische Gesellschaft e. V.

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Aktuelles
news-3682 Tue, 06 Oct 2020 09:30:00 +0200 Hunting for the lowest known nuclear-excited state https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3682&cHash=1ea275c90b1ffd1b98d0b582cc31a834 Nuclear clocks could make our time measurement even more accurate than atomic clocks. The key to this lies in thorium-229, an atomic nucleus whose lowest excited state has very low energy. A research team from the Kirchhoff Institute for Physics at the University of Heidelberg, TU Wien, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), and GSI Helmholtzzentrum in Darmstadt has now succeeded in measuring this low energy. Using an extremely accurate detector, it was possible ... This is a joint press release of University of Heidelberg, TU Wien, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung.

Nuclear clocks could make our time measurement even more accurate than atomic clocks. The key to this lies in thorium-229, an atomic nucleus whose lowest excited state has very low energy. A research team from the Kirchhoff Institute for Physics at the University of Heidelberg, TU Wien, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), and GSI Helmholtzzentrum in Darmstadt has now succeeded in measuring this low energy. Using an extremely accurate detector, it was possible to detect the tiny temperature increase due to the energy released during the de-excitation of the atomic nucleus. This brings the realization of a nuclear clock a big step closer.

In radioactive decay, atomic nuclei spontaneously re-arrange, eject some part of their building blocks, and transform into a nucleus of a different atom. In this process, the new "daughter atom" usually has internally stored energy that is released in the form of gamma rays. The energies of these rays are characteristic for each type of nucleus – just like fingerprints. Researchers learn a lot about atomic nuclei by characterizing these gamma-ray fingerprints.

Back in 1976, L. A. Kroger and C. W. Reich investigated the decay of uranium-233, which is an artificial nucleus of uranium that decays to thorium-229 by emitting an alpha-particle; this is immediately followed by the emission of characteristic gamma-rays that occur in distinct and generally well-understood patterns. Kroger and Reich, however, registered an anomaly: one gamma-ray that was predicted by all nuclear theories was missing in the measured signals. The best explanation was that the internal energy stored in the lowest nuclear excitation of thorium-229 was too low to be observed by the detectors. Over the following decades, many attempts were made to observe this low-energy gamma-ray without success, constraining it to ever-lower energies.

New perspectives for constructing an atomic clock

Nowadays, we know that the lowest excited-energy state of the thorium-229 nucleus, called an isomer state, is located at the lowest known energy among all nuclei, at an energy that is orders of magnitudes lower than usual excitation energies. Consequently, the energy of the associated gamma-ray is so low that it is placed in the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum rather than in the typical gamma-ray region. This leads to the unique situation that the opposite process of the de-excitation by the emission of this "ultraviolet gamma-ray", namely the excitation of the lower state is possible by shining ultraviolet light onto the nucleus. It is the only nuclear system that could be excited with "table-top" laser light. This opens up exciting prospects, including the construction of a "nuclear" clock, in which time is measured by oscillations of the nucleus between these two states. The precision of such a clock is predicted to be better than that of the best current atomic clocks, which rely on oscillations between states in the electron shell, which is more susceptible to external perturbations than the 10.000 times smaller nucleus.

The key problem is, though, that the energy of the isomer state is not yet known with sufficient precision to know which ultraviolet light is needed to stimulate the oscillation. A consortium of researchers from Heidelberg, Vienna, Mainz, and Darmstadt have now repeated the iconic gamma spectroscopy measurement of Kroger and Reich, but using a highly advanced state-of-the-art gamma spectrometer, designed explicitly for registering rays of such low energy.

Cool studies give the highest precision

For this, the research team of Professor Christian Enss and Dr. Andreas Fleischmann at the Kirchhoff Institute for Physics at the University of Heidelberg developed a magnetic microcalorimeter named maXs30. This detector is cooled to minus 273 degrees Celsius and measures the minuscule temperature rise that occurs when a gamma-ray is absorbed. The temperature increase leads to a change in the detector's magnetic properties, which is then converted into an electric signal using SQUID magnetometers similar to those that are commonly used in magnetic resonance tomography. The maXs30 detector has unprecedented energy resolution and gain linearity; still, it took about 12 weeks of continuous measurement to obtain the gamma-ray spectrum with sufficient precision.

To make this challenging measurement possible, the team of Professor Christoph Düllmann in Mainz and Darmstadt produced a special sample of uranium-233. First, they chemically removed all decay daughter products that had built up over time before the sample was used. They also removed unwanted radioisotopes, the decay of which leads to an unwanted background in the measured data. Then they designed a source geometry and sample container that led to minimum interference of the weak signals on their way from the sample to the maXs30 calorimeters. These steps were required for the success of the measurement because only one in 10,000 decay processes produces a signal that is useful for the determination of the isomer energy. The measurement produced the most precise gamma-ray spectrum of uranium-233 to thorium-229 decay to date. The team of Professor Thorsten Schumm at TU Wien, together with the Heidelberg team, employed four different schemes to derive the energy of the isomer state from this data. The most precise one yielded a value of 8.10(17) electronvolts, which corresponds to light of a wavelength of 153.1(32) nanometers, with the number in parentheses indicating the uncertainty of the last digits. This measurement paves the way for a direct laser excitation of the thorium-229 isomer. (LW)

More information

Physics Viewpoint “Ticking Toward a Nuclear Clock”
Energy spectrum -"Magnetic micro-calorimeter raw data"

Originalveröffentlichung: Measurement of the 229Th Isomer Energy with a Magnetic Microcalorimeter

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Presse Aktuelles
news-3680 Mon, 05 Oct 2020 13:08:09 +0200 Almudena Arcones elected Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3680&cHash=0636b484df48d2d38de897c263db6a31 Professor Almudena Arcones has been elected "Fellow 2020" of the American Physical Society (APS). With this prestigious recognition, the APS honors Almudena Arcones' outstanding contributions in the field of astrophysics. The Spanish-German physicist works since 2007 in the GSI Theory department with a joint appointment with the Technische Universität Darmstadt. Professor Almudena Arcones has been elected "Fellow 2020" of the American Physical Society (APS). With this prestigious recognition, the APS honors Almudena Arcones' outstanding contributions in the field of astrophysics. The Spanish-German physicist works since 2007 in the GSI Theory department with a joint appointment with the Technische Universität Darmstadt.

Almudena Arcones receives the election as APS-Fellow "for seminal contributions in astro- and nuclear physics, especially to the understanding of heavy elements creation in supernovae, neutron star mergers, and their associated kilonova”. The research focus of the physicist, who is an associate professor for theoretical astrophysics at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, includes core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers as astrophysical sites of the r-process.

Almudena Arcones conducted research at the Max Planck Institut für Astrophysik in Garching from 2004 to 2007 and received her doctorate from the Technische Universität München in 2007. From 2007 to 2010 she worked as a postdoctoral fellow at GSI and the Institut für Kernphysik (SFB 634) at the Technische Universität Darmstadt. Subsequently, she conducted research in the Department of Physics at the University of Basel until 2012. From 2012 to 2016 she was assistant professor for theoretical astrophysics at the Technische Universität Darmstadt, where she has been working as associate professor since 2016. From 2012 to 2017 she was group leader of a Helmholtz Young Investigator Group at GSI.

Almudena Arcones has already received several important awards, including the ERC-Starting Grant of the European Research Council 2016. Her topic was "The origin of heavy elements: a nuclear physics and astrophysics challenge”. The prize enabled her and her team to carry out new investigations on the origin of the elements in stars. As theoretical work, these simulations on element synthesis will also be important and pioneering for experimental research at the future accelerator center FAIR, which is currently being built at GSI.

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, was enthusiastic about the honoring of Almudena Arcones: "The election as APS Fellow is a very prestigious award and a special honor, expressing the respect of scientists from the same professional environment. I am glad about the peers’ great appreciation for Almudena Arcones and her work, which also makes an outstanding contribution to current and future research at GSI and FAIR".

The APS is one of the most important physics societies worldwide. It was founded in 1899 and today has more than 55 000 members worldwide. It is divided into numerous specialist groups covering all areas of physical research. APS members attain the status of a Fellow on the basis of a precisely defined nomination and evaluation process. Each year, the APS elects no more than one half of one percent of the society’s membership as fellow. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3678 Tue, 29 Sep 2020 10:15:51 +0200 Georg Forster Award: Argentinean scientist conducts research at GSI/FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3678&cHash=a6a13a31e2013d37a2986f0ab9fcec6e Professor Omar Azzaroni from Argentina has received the Georg Forster Research Award, granted by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, for his research in the field of nanosciences. As award winner, he will work in close cooperation with the Materials Research Department of GSI. Professor Omar Azzaroni from Argentina has received the Georg Forster Research Award, granted by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, for his research in the field of nanosciences. As award winner, he will work in close cooperation with the Materials Research Department of GSI.

The Georg Forster Research Award honors researchers from developing and transition countries who have earned international recognition for their research and seek to solve development-related issues. The award winners are nominated by German experts and invited to establish or expand collaborative projects with them. Valued at €60,000 each, the Georg Forster Research Awards are financed by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Omar Azzaroni studied chemistry at the National University La Plata UNLP (Universidad Nacional de La Plata) in Argentina, receiving his PhD in 2004. His postdoctoral studies were carried out at the University of Cambridge in UK (2004– 2006) and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz (2007). He was then appointed as Max Planck Partner Group leader from 2009 until 2013. Max Planck Partner Groups are an instrument in the joint promotion of junior scientists with countries interested in strengthening their research through international cooperation. Contacts to GSI have existed for many years, mainly through working with GSI scientist Dr. Eugenia Toimil-Molares.

From 2012 to 2015, Omar Azzaroni has served as Vice-Director of the Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physical-Chemical Research INIFTA (Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquímicas Teóricas y Aplicadas). He is currently a fellow of the Argentinean National Council of Scientific and Technological Research CONICET and head of the Soft Matter Laboratory of INIFTA. He has also been Adjunct Professor of Physical Chemistry at the University La Plata since 2009. His research interests include solid-state nanopores, nanostructured hybrid interfaces, supra- and macromolecular materials science and nanotechnology.

During his stay at the GSI and FAIR campus, Omar Azzaroni will work together with his colleagues from the GSI materials research department and use nanopores that are produced by irradiating polymer films with high-energy heavy ions. The head of the department, Professor Christina Trautmann, emphasizes in her laudatio of the laureate: “Professor Omar Azzaroni has made pioneering contributions by combining polymer science, surface chemistry and nanotechnology.” Based on his chemistry expertise, he developed polymer brushes of designed composition, structure, and functionality such as responsiveness to temperature.

Omar Azzaroni will focus on the fabrication of nanodevices with chemical and biological sensor properties through the modification of nanochannels with molecular systems. He will integrate soft-matter based responsive building blocks into solid-state nanopores. The aim is to develop intelligent nanosystems that can recognize chemically or physically triggered environmental changes and adjust e.g. the pore diameter as a function of temperature. This smart materials-based nanotechnology has great innovative potential and could open up new applications in the future, for example in drug delivery, biosensing or energy conversion. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3676 Fri, 25 Sep 2020 10:23:33 +0200 Achievements and prospects: BMBF State Secretary visits GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3676&cHash=f0e12ab2ae81237d1c23c5b591ea472b The research at FAIR and the ongoing research activities in the run up to its establishment were the focus of a visit by Professor Wolf-Dieter Lukas, State Secretary at the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Together with further senior staff from the BMBF, he heard all about the outlook for the future at the FAIR and GSI campus. The research at FAIR and the ongoing research activities in the run up to its establishment were the focus of a visit by Professor Wolf-Dieter Lukas, State Secretary at the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Together with further senior staff from the BMBF, he heard all about the outlook for the future at the FAIR and GSI campus.

The guests were welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director, and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director.

The guests enjoyed presentations and a guided tour, giving them comprehensive insights into current and planned research activities at the FAIR facilities. State Secretary Lukas was impressed by the achievements of GSI, by the outstanding activities carried out as part of the current “FAIR Phase 0” program and by the promising scientific prospects that will emerge once FAIR becomes operational: “Fundamental scientific research forms a crucial foundation for development and progress in a society. Supporting such research is therefore a key priority of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Today, I have seen for myself what excellent, cutting-edge research is being done here at GSI and the compelling scientific potential of the future FAIR facilities.”

The unique possibilities of FAIR and future challenges were also the focus of a tour of the existing accelerator facility. Young researchers and responsible scientists at various parts of the facility gave the guests insight into their work, including the experimental storage ring ESR, the medical radiation unit of the biophysics department, the large-scale experiments R3B and HADES as well as the high-performance computer center Green IT Cube. Summarizing his visit State Secretary Lukas stressed, “I am particularly impressed by the high level of expertise and the enthusiasm shown by the young researchers I met during the visit for their work at GSI.”

At the international accelerator center FAIR, which is being built at GSI, extreme forms of matter that usually only exist in neutron stars, supernovae, stars or large gas planets are to be produced and researched in the lab. FAIR will thus investigate "the universe in the laboratory". FAIR's future research work will build on the successful research at GSI. Scientists from all over the world will use the different areas of GSI and FAIR to carry out unique experiments and obtain new insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe.

The experimental storage ring ESR, for example, enables the storage and (beam) cooling of highly charged ions and exotic nuclei. The stored ion beams will be used with the highest levels of quality and precision for unique experiments testing the fundamentals law of physics and opening the door to studying key astrophysical processes. Storage ring physics is one of the unique features of GSI and FAIR.

At the medical radiation unit, where cancer patients were successfully treated with ion beams for the first time in Europe in 1997, future research will focus on technical and radiobiological advancements in ion beam therapy and on space research. This will include assessments of radiation exposure during long-term space missions in collaboration with the European Space Agency.

Within the R3B experiment, which was set up for FAIR by an international collaboration and is already active now in the "FAIR Phase 0" research program, reaction experiments with high-energy exotic nuclei are conducted. These experiments are important for understanding the origin of the heavy elements in the universe such as gold.

The HADES detector (Hi Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer) for FAIR is also already operational and is used to study high-energy nuclear collisions. HADES will allow scientists to understand the properties of hot, highly compressed nuclear matter as it is produced in the universe, for example, when neutron stars collide.

The Green IT Cube is a very powerful and energy-efficient high-performance computer center, the only one in Germany awarded the Blauer Engel certificate for environmental friendliness. It was designed as the central IT center for the storage and analysis of the huge amounts of data that will be generated by the FAIR experiments. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3674 Mon, 21 Sep 2020 09:58:59 +0200 Uwe Niedermayer is awarded DPG Young Scientist Prize for Accelerator Physics https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3674&cHash=64230f0763903b7452c3951c60158b0c Dr. Uwe Niedermayer has received the Young Scientist Award for Accelerator Physics of the German Physical Society (DPG). The award honors his scientific achievements in the development of simulation programs that are used, for example, for the design and calculation of future accelerators at GSI/FAIR and CERN as well as his contributions to the realization of a laser driven accelerator on a chip. Dr. Uwe Niedermayer has received the Young Scientist Award for Accelerator Physics of the German Physical Society (DPG). The award honors his scientific achievements in the development of simulation programs that are used, for example, for the design and calculation of future accelerators at GSI/FAIR and CERN as well as his contributions to the realization of a laser driven accelerator on a chip.

Niedermayer works at the Institute for Particle Acceleration and Electromagnetic Fields (TEMF) in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at the Technical University of Darmstadt. There he is part of the group of Professor Oliver Boine-Frankenheim, head of the GSI accelerator physics department. In his doctoral thesis, Uwe Niedermayer also carried out simulation calculations for the design of the ring accelerator SIS100, the heart of the FAIR accelerator center currently being built at GSI.

The prize is awarded to Uwe Niedermayer for his outstanding scientific achievements during his doctorate and initial research phase. An acceleration scheme he conceived is regarded as one of the most important breakthroughs on the way to a novel laser-driven, dielectric electron accelerator on a microchip. At the same time, Niedermayer's research makes important contributions in the field of high-temperature thin-film superconductors for the design study of the Future Circular Collider (FCC) planned at CERN in Geneva.

"With his work, Uwe Niedermayer has already acquired an international reputation and high esteem after a relatively short research phase. His activities lead us to expect further outstanding research results in the near future," is stated in the appreciation. The research prize, awarded by the DPG und its Arbeitskreis Beschleunigerphysik (AKBP), is intended to promote accelerator physics as an independent field of research in Germany and is awarded to young researchers at German universities or research institutions whose doctoral thesis was completed no more than five years ago and who have distinguished themselves through outstanding, original and independent research contributions.

The prize was presented at the DPG's machine learning seminar in the physics center in Bad Honnef. During the event, the expertise with accelerators in Darmstadt was honoured even one more time by an award ceremony: Dr. Bernhard Franzke received the Horst Klein Prize of the DPG Arbeitskreis Beschleunigerphysik, which is aimed at internationally renowned scientists who have distinguished themselves through outstanding achievements of great significance and high originality. The prize had been awarded to him in spring (as reported), but could not be presented at that time. Bernhard Franzke has been a leading accelerator physicist at GSI for many years and was significantly involved in the construction and development of UNILAC, the ESR and many experiments. In the years 2000 until 2005 he played an important role in developing the concept of the storage rings at FAIR. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3670 Fri, 04 Sep 2020 10:12:37 +0200 Award of the Foundation for Polish Science for Prof. Hans Geissel https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3670&cHash=3b99e6e811e6918811bc08c7e61073e6 For his outstanding scientific achievements in the field of exotic nuclei the physicist Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Hans Geissel receives the Polish Alexander von Humboldt Award in Physics. Prof. Geissel is senior scientist in the FRS/Super-FRS research department at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Facility for Antiproton an Ion Research (FAIR GmbH) in Darmstadt as well as Professor at Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen (JLU). For his outstanding scientific achievements in the field of exotic nuclei the physicist Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Hans Geissel receives the Polish Alexander von Humboldt Award in Physics. Prof. Geissel is senior scientist in the FRS/Super-FRS research department at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Facility for Antiproton an Ion Research (FAIR GmbH) in Darmstadt as well as Professor at Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen (JLU). The award, which involves the financing of a research stay, is granted by the Foundation for Polish Science (Fundacja na rzecz Nauki Polskiej, FNP), a partner organization of the German Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. The award is given to excellent active German scientists to honor their work and to enable them to carry out scientific research at a selected institution in Poland.

Prof. Geissel receives the award for his many years of successful studies with short-lived nuclei and the investigation of their properties. Together with the Polish scientists Prof. Dr. Zygmunt Patyk (National Center for Nuclear Research, Świerk-Warsaw) and Prof. Dr. Marek Pfützner (University of Warsaw) he realized pioneering experiments with the GSI fragment separator FRS. Together with Prof. Patyk and his research group, he was able for the first time to perform highly accurate mass measurements of exotic nuclei that were produced, separated at FRS and cooled in the storage ring ESR. The collaboration with Prof. Pfützner and his research group also resulted in many publications of worldwide acclaim, of which the discovery of numerous new isotopes and two-proton radioactivity are particularly outstanding. With a total of 276 isotopes discovered, Prof. Geissel has held the world record since 2012.

"This award naturally also represents an international recognition of the scientific work of the entire research group at the FRS and FRS-ESR", said Prof. Geissel. "I would also like to take this opportunity to thank my former teachers, Professors Heinz Ewald, Ulrich Mosel, Gottfried Münzenberg, Werner Scheid and Herrmann Wollnik, who showed me the way to ion research". In connection with the award, further research work of the international German-Polish collaboration is planned to be carried out until 2023. Japanese scientists are also involved in this. The first experiments were already successfully carried out at the FRS in spring of this year. Further research work at the accelerator facility FAIR in Darmstadt and at the Japanese research center RIKEN should form the basis for further scientific successes in the near future.

The two Polish institutions involved - the National Center for Nuclear Research and the University of Warsaw - are members of the Super-FRS Experiment Collaboration and thus belong to the NUSTAR (NUclear STructure Astro-physics and Reactions) activity at FAIR. Stays of Prof. Geissel with lectures are also planned at the University of Warsaw and the National Center for Nuclear Research in Warsaw, since the education and motivation of young physics students is a major concern of all participating institutions.

The Foundation for Polish Science annually awards prizes for works in various scientific disciplines. This year, in addition to Prof. Geissel, a scientist from the field of biomineralogy and a scientist from the field of history are honored. (JL)

This news is based on a press release of Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

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news-3668 Mon, 31 Aug 2020 09:50:15 +0200 Mass of the deuteron corrected https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3668&cHash=35915dacb010334f23d021ada6072a6d High-precision measurements of the mass of the deuteron, the nucleus of heavy hydrogen, provide new insights into the reliability of fundamental quantities in atomic and nuclear physics. This is reported in the journal "Nature" by a collaboration led by the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics Heidelberg, Germany, and partners from the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research Darmstadt and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Germany. This news is based on a press release of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg

High-precision measurements of the mass of the deuteron, the nucleus of heavy hydrogen, provide new insights into the reliability of fundamental quantities in atomic and nuclear physics. This is reported in the journal "Nature" by a collaboration led by the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics Heidelberg, Germany, and partners from the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research Darmstadt and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Germany. Thus, data directly related to the atomic mass standard, are now available for hydrogen H, deuterium D and the molecule HD, which the scientists have also reweighed.

The masses of both atomic nuclei and electrons influence numerous properties of atoms and molecules, for example their spectra, i.e., which light colours they absorb or emit. Physicists like values of these masses to be as accurate as possible, because only with their knowledge precise calculations using atomic physics are possible for these spectra. Calculations are then confronted to direct measurements, which, for example, allows drawing conclusions about the reliability of basic physical theories.

Hydrogen and its isotopes are of particular interest in this context, because their simple electron shell with only a single electron allows extremely precise calculations and thus very sensitive tests of fundamental physical theories. Furthermore, the mass of the deuteron can also be used to derive the mass of the neutron – the second component of atomic nuclei besides the proton. After having already precisely weighed the electron and the proton, the nucleus of the ordinary hydrogen atom, in recent years, researchers around Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm from the MPI for Nuclear Physics have now also put the deuteron, the nucleus of heavy hydrogen consisting of a proton and a neutron, and the HD+ molecular ion on the "precision scale". Since deuterium is rare and is usually easily replaced by the much more common normal hydrogen, Christoph Düllmann's research group in Mainz produced a tailor-made deuterium sample that fits the used apparatus perfectly.

Penning traps have proven to be the best precision scales for ions. In such a trap, single charged particles can be trapped for a long time with the help of electric and magnetic fields. The trapped particle performs a characteristic motion in the trap, which is described by a frequency. This frequency depends on the mass of the trapped particle – heavier particles oscillate more slowly than lighter ones. If two different, individual ions are measured one after the other in the same trap, the ratio of the masses can be determined exactly – similar to a classical mechanical beam balance.

Sophisticated measurement technology for maximum precision

The mass standard for atoms is the carbon isotope 12C, which by definition weighs 12 atomic mass units. "Our Penning trap apparatus called LIONTRAP is located in a superconducting magnet in nearly perfect vacuum at a temperature of about 4 degrees above absolute zero (–269°C). We prepared a deuteron (D+) and a carbon ion (12C6+) in the apparatus, alternately transferred one of them from its storage trap to the precision trap located between the storage traps and measured its movement with highest precision," says Sascha Rau, who carried out the measurements in the context of his PhD, explaining the measuring principle. "The ratio of the frequencies of both ions obtained in this way directly gives the mass of the deuteron in atomic units." So, the carbon ion acts as a reference weight on the "beam balance".

When evaluating the measurement data, the physicists had to consider very carefully the influence of many unavoidable systematic effects. As a result, they obtained the mass of the deuteron as 2.013553212535(17) atomic units, with the number in parentheses indicating the uncertainty of the last digits. The mass of the hydrogen molecular ion HD+, determined by the same method, is 3.021378241561(61) atomic units.

The new value for the mass of the deuteron is the most accurate ever measured, but is significantly smaller than the tabulated reference value. "To validate our result, we calculated the mass of HD+ with this value and with the masses of the proton and the electron previously measured by us, as well as the known binding energy. The result is in excellent agreement with our directly measured value. In addition, the mass ratio of deuteron to proton derived from our data fits very well with the value directly measured by another group," says Sven Sturm with satisfaction. This consistency of the data underpins the used measurement methodology and suggests that the reference values should be corrected. In addition, the new data considerably reduces the discrepancies that previously existed among the masses of light nuclei. However, in order to fully resolve these discrepancies, further high-precision mass measurements – directly in atomic units – of super-heavy hydrogen (tritium) and of light helium are required. (MPIK/CP/BP)

Further information

Press release on the website of Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics

Scientific publication "Penning-trap mass measurements of the deuteron and the HD+ molecular ion" in the journal Nature

Accompanying article in the category "News and Views" in the journal Nature

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news-3666 Tue, 25 Aug 2020 15:22:40 +0200 Successful large-scale copper plating: GSI Electroplating achieves important milestone for FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3666&cHash=cd2235376577d84c44b8823931d48456 An important success has been achieved in the Electroplating Department of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung: The copper plating of a cavity with two meter in diameter was successfully realized. This is also of great importance for the future accelerator center FAIR. In order to achieve the FAIR parameters, the existing linear accelerator UNILAC, which will serve as a pre-accelerator in the future, has to be partially upgraded with new cavities. An important success has been achieved in the Electroplating Department of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung: The copper plating of a cavity with two meter in diameter was successfully realized. This is also of great importance for the future accelerator center FAIR. In order to achieve the FAIR parameters, the existing linear accelerator UNILAC, which will serve as a pre-accelerator in the future, has to be partially upgraded with new cavities.

Cavities or cavity resonators are central elements of accelerators. Therein, strong electromagnetic fields oscillate, transferring their energy to the particles flying along the tube axis. To improve electrical conductivity, the surfaces are copper-plated. At GSI and FAIR, the Electroplating Department is responsible for coating the tanks and components of the particle accelerators with a layer of high-gloss copper from inside. The task of electroplating is challenging, the demands on surface quality are high.

Currently, the Alvarez accelerator structure, a section of GSI-UNILAC, has to be replaced for future top performance so that FAIR can deliver the planned high beam quality. One of the critical points in this upgrade is the copper plating of particularly large cavity sections. This is a challenge that was last faced at GSI more than 20 years ago. Nevertheless, the GSI Electroplating Department has now succeeded in demonstrating its ability to copperplate a cavity of this size on the very first attempt. Thus, a very crucial aspect of the Alvarez replacement has been addressed and positively solved.

The electroplating facility, which has developed in the course of the accelerator expansion on the GSI and FAIR campus, is unique. It allows high-polish copper plating of metal surfaces such as steel and stainless steel up to 200 micrometers thickness. It is above all the size of the elements to be copper-plated that makes the plant exceptional. Even a crane is used during maneuvering to move the heavy components back and forth between the various cleaning and coating baths. Elements can be copper-plated up to a maximum length of 2.5 meters and a diameter of up to 2.5 meters. (BP)

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news-3664 Thu, 06 Aug 2020 14:30:00 +0200 "target" Magazine Issue 18 with Special Supplement: Corona published https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3664&cHash=84e3dace6d3d5c4d76ef03a987dd0e66 Two major topics are the focus of the 18th issue of our magazine "target" of GSI and FAIR. On the one hand, the corona pandemic has impacted all areas of our lives. Therefore, we have attached a special supplement to this issue, which is dedicated to the operations and research at GSI and FAIR during this time and our efforts to fight the pandemic. On the other hand, last year we celebrated our 50th anniversary with many activities and events. Two major topics are the focus of the 18th issue of our magazine "target" of GSI and FAIR. On the one hand, the corona pandemic has impacted all areas of our lives. Of course, this also applies to our campus and our activities. Therefore, we have attached a special supplement to this issue, which is dedicated to the operations and research at GSI and FAIR during this time and our efforts to fight the pandemic. On the other hand, last year we celebrated our 50th anniversary with many activities and events. You will find more in the main issue.

In addition to looking back at our history, we look to the future: to our experiments of FAIR Phase 0, to new FAIR components and to the awarding of ERC grants to our researchers. In this issue we are particularly pleased to introduce our new Administrative Managing Director, Dr. Ulrich Breuer. We also report on the meeting of international element discoverers, merging neutron stars, star collisions at 800 billion °C, other research highlights and much more.

We’ve taken our anniversary as an opportunity to give our magazine a new style. In this new look, we will continue to keep you up to date about the progress achieved by our research programs and the construction of FAIR as well as current events on our campus. (CP)

Download of "target" – Issue 18, August 2020 (PDF, 12 MB)

Download of Special Supplement: Corona, August 2020 (PDF, 3 MB)

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news-3650 Tue, 28 Jul 2020 14:00:00 +0200 High award for GSI scientist: Marco Durante receives the Failla Award of the Radiation Research Society https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3650&cHash=99fbb8bb3d1be9ce0242942ee412e061 Marco Durante, head of the GSI Biophysics Research Department and professor at the TU Darmstadt, has been awarded the prestigious Failla Award 2020 by the Radiation Research Society (RRS). Professor Durante has been invited to give a lecture on his scientific career at the virtual annual RRS meeting in October this year. The award has been announced at the end of June. Marco Durante, head of the GSI Biophysics Research Department and professor at the TU Darmstadt, has been awarded the prestigious Failla Award 2020 by the Radiation Research Society (RRS). Professor Durante has been invited to give a lecture on his scientific career at the virtual annual RRS meeting in October this year. The award has been announced at the end of June.

Marco Durante is an internationally recognized expert in the field of radiation biology and medical physics. He is being awarded the prize for his significant contributions to the optimization of therapy with heavy ions and for his studies on radiation protection in space. "This award is a great honour for me. As a student, I read the Failla Award paper by Cornelius Tobias (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), the father of heavy ion therapy, on heavy ions in therapy and space research, and I became enthusiastic about that topic. After 37 years from Tobias, spending my whole scientific career on that very topic, that same award comes to me. The award actually recognizes the research of my team at GSI/FAIR over the past years. It is the result of the work of the whole Biophysics Department", Professor Durante reacted to the news from RRS. "The prize is an enormous incentive for us to continue our research at GSI and in the future at the FAIR facility, with the Biophysics Collaboration, at the highest level.“

Professor Paolo Giubellino, scientific director of GSI and FAIR, is delighted about the award: "­I am extremely pleased that the outstanding research achievements of Marco Durante and his team have received the recognition they deserve with the Failla award, the most important worldwide in this field. The work of Marco Durante and his team is a prime example of how basic research and applications can come together at an interdisciplinary research center and underlines the excellence of scientific research at GSI and FAIR". 

The prestigious award is named after the scientist Gioacchino Failla, former president of RRS and one of its founding fathers. It is awarded annually to an outstanding member of the radiation research community who has made significant contributions in the fields of radiation science. The handover of the prize money of $2000 and an accompanying medal usually takes place during the annual meeting of the RRS. It is the highest award of RRS, established in 1963 and has been received only by a few Europeans, including a single researcher working in Germany (Herwig Paretzke in 2007). Due to the corona pandemic, the RRS is organising its annual meeting virtually this year, so that the prize is delivered in advance. During the online event in October 2020 Durante will deliver his Failla lecture.

Marco Durante is head of the GSI Biophysics Research Department and professor at the TU Darmstadt Department of Physics, Institute of Condensed Matter of Physics. He studied physics and got his PhD at the University Federico II in Italy. His post doc positions took him to the NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas and to the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. During his studies, he specialized in charged particle therapy, cosmic radiation, radiation cytogenetics and radiation biophysics. He has received numerous awards for his research, including the Galileo Galilei prize from the European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (EFOMP), the Timoffeeff-Ressovsky award of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), the Warren Sinclair award of the US National Council of Radiation Protection (NCRP), the IBA-­Europhysics Prize of the European Physical Society (EPS) and the Bacq & Alexander award of the European Radiation Research Society (ERRS). He has recently been awarded an ERC advanced grant. (JL)

More information:

Web-Site ot the Radiation Research Society

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news-3662 Mon, 27 Jul 2020 11:00:00 +0200 From the beginning of life to the origin of the universe https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3662&cHash=68719a591dc197000a4a23cebded9e8b Does life exist only on earth? How did the universe we live in come into being? And what holds matter together at its core? Researchers at the Bergische Universität Wuppertal are getting to the bottom of these questions using various large-scale experiments. The astroparticle physicists receive funding for their research from the Federal Ministry of Science and Research, the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy, represented by the project management organizations DLR and PT-DESY (Deutsches Elektronen-S This news is based on a press release of Bergische Universität Wuppertal

Does life exist only on earth? How did the universe we live in come into being? And what holds matter together at its core? Researchers at the Bergische Universität Wuppertal are getting to the bottom of these questions using various large-scale experiments. The astroparticle physicists receive funding for their research from the Federal Ministry of Science and Research, the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy, represented by the project management organizations DLR and PT-DESY (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron), and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung.

For their projects, the Wuppertal researchers, led by astroparticle physicists Professor Dr. Karl-Heinz Kampert and Professor Dr. Klaus Helbing, will get a total of around two million euros in funding. Several major projects are associated with this.

A mission to the outer solar system will investigate whether life has developed there. As part of a project initiated by the German Aerospace Center (DLR), researchers at the University of Wuppertal are developing new techniques for radar-based navigation in the ice. These methods are to be used on a possible mission to the icy moon Europa.

In the galaxy beyond our solar system, supernovae, i.e. massive stars, play an important role in the origin of the chemical elements that make life possible for us. Which forces are present and how does matter behave under extreme conditions, existing for example inside neutron stars? The researchers involved in the CBM experiment are investigating these questions. The experiment for Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) is currently being realized within the FAIR project. It is one of the four major research pillars of the future accelerator center FAIR, which is being built at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. This will enable researchers to study processes in neutron stars with unprecedented precision and over a very wide range of densities.

Another project deals with high-energy particles from huge galaxies far away from the Milky Way. How do they reach these extreme energies and how do they get to Earth over millions of years through the extra-galactic magnetic fields? To gain new insights, the various particles are measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory on Earth and compared with cosmological simulations. The detection of photons that travel these huge distances also provides important information on the space-time structure. 

Our present universe consists mainly of matter and not of antimatter. The reasons for this dominance are still completely unknown. A key to understanding this could be the so-called "ghost particle" neutrino. The KATRIN experiment (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino Experiment) aims to determine the mass of the neutrino, which could be a key to this mystery. Particles that interact with the neutrinos as so-called "dark matter" could also be detected in this framework. 

The neutrino has also been used in astronomy and cosmology for several years. With the IceCube telescope, located directly at the South Pole in Antarctica, Wuppertal researchers are looking for particles that are thought to have been emitted shortly after the Big Bang. From their characteristics, the processes during the formation of the universe can be reconstructed. Work is currently underway on an upgrade for this particle detector. The Wuppertal scientists are working with international colleagues to develop new sensors for this purpose. (BUW/BP)

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news-3660 Mon, 20 Jul 2020 08:37:12 +0200 Patrick Burghardt visits FAIR and GSI https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3660&cHash=87b829b7b194e5ae29a7b00e7ffac1e2 Patrick Burghardt, State Secretary in the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Development and CIO of the Federal State of Hesse, was a guest at GSI and FAIR. His visit focused on the energy-efficient high-performance computer center Green IT Cube and the progress of the FAIR project. He was accompanied by the Hessian Co-CIO Roland Jabkowski. Patrick Burghardt, State Secretary in the Hessian Ministry for Digital Strategy and Development and CIO of the Federal State of Hesse, was a guest at GSI and FAIR. His visit focused on the energy-efficient high-performance computer center Green IT Cube and the progress of the FAIR project. He was accompanied by the Hessian Co-CIO Roland Jabkowski.

The guests were welcomed by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director, and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director. Furthermore, the head of the IT department at GSI and FAIR, Dr. Thorsten Kollegger, the head of technology transfer, Dr. Tobias Engert, and Carola Pomplun from the press and public relations department were also participating for GSI and FAIR.

Central topic of Patrick Burghardt's visit was sustainable digitalization. Here, the energy-efficient Green IT Cube offers huge scientific and technological as well as economic potential. During presentations and a guided tour of the Green IT Cube, the State Secretary used the opportunity to obtain comprehensive information about the high-performance data center and its infrastructure and expressed great interest in the very promising prospects. The subsequent discussions also focused on exploring potential cooperation and joint objectives for research, development and use of Green IT technology.

The Green IT Cube on the GSI/FAIR campus provides enormous computing capacities for experiments at the accelerator facilities of GSI and, in the future, FAIR. It is one of the most capable scientific computing centers in the world. At the same time, it sets standards in IT technology and energy saving: Thanks to a special cooling system, it is particularly energy- and cost-efficient. Therefore, the energy required for cooling is less than seven percent of the electrical power used for computing. In conventional data centers with air cooling, this relation amounts to 30 up to 100 percent. The Green IT Cube has already received numerous awards, including recently the Blue Angel, the eco label of the German government.

After visiting the Green IT Cube, the guests had the opportunity to inform themselves about the current status of the FAIR construction project and to take a look at the progress on the 20-hectare construction site: from the completed sections for the central ring accelerator SIS100 and the transfer building to the excavation pit for the first of the future experimental caves. (BP)

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news-3658 Wed, 15 Jul 2020 08:32:00 +0200 Researchers present concept for a new technique to study superheavy elements https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3658&cHash=851bebfa75a534bc40208c5b3139ce79 Superheavy elements are intriguing nuclear and atomic quantum systems that challenge experimental probing as they do not occur in nature and, when synthesized, vanish within seconds. Pushing the forefront atomic physics research to these elements requires breakthrough developments towards fast atomic spectroscopy techniques with extreme sensitivity. This news is based on a press release of Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.

Superheavy elements are intriguing nuclear and atomic quantum systems that challenge experimental probing as they do not occur in nature and, when synthesized, vanish within seconds. Pushing the forefront atomic physics research to these elements requires breakthrough developments towards fast atomic spectroscopy techniques with extreme sensitivity. A joint effort within the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation program and led by Dr. Mustapha Laatiaoui from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and at the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM), a branch of GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, culminated in an optical spectroscopy proposal: The so-called Laser Resonance Chromatography (LRC) should enable such investigations even at minute production quantities. The proposal has recently been published in two articles in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review A.

Superheavy elements (SHEs) are found at the bottom part of the periodic table of elements. They represent a fertile ground for the development of understanding on how such exotic atoms can exist and work when an overwhelming number of electrons in atomic shells and protons and neutrons in the nucleus come together. Insights into their electronic structure can be obtained from optical spectroscopy experiments unveiling element-specific emission spectra. These spectra are powerful benchmarks for modern atomic-model calculations and could be useful, for example, when it comes to searching for traces of even heavier elements, which might be created in neutron-star merger events.

LRC approach combines different methods

Although SHEs have been discovered decades ago, their investigation by optical spectroscopy tools lack far behind the synthesis. This is because they are produced at extremely low rates at which traditional methods simply do not work. So far, optical spectroscopy ends at nobelium, element 102 in the periodic table. "Current techniques are at the limit of what is feasible," explained Laatiaoui. From the next heavier element on, the physicochemical properties change abruptly and impede providing samples in suitable atomic states."

Together with research colleagues, the physicist has therefore developed the new LRC approach in optical spectroscopy. This combines element selectivity and spectral precision of laser spectroscopy with ion-mobility mass spectrometry and merges the benefits of a high sensitivity with the "simplicity" of optical probing as in laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Its key idea is to detect the products of resonant optical excitations not on the basis of fluorescent light as usual, but based on their characteristic drift time to a particle detector.

In their theoretical work, the researchers focused on singly charged lawrencium, element 103, and on its lighter chemical homolog. But the concept offers unparalleled access to laser spectroscopy of many other monoatomic ions across the periodic table, in particular of the transition metals including the high-temperature refractory metals and elements beyond lawrencium. Other ionic species like triply-charged thorium shall be within reach of the LRC approach as well. Moreover, the method enables to optimize signal-to-noise ratios and thus to ease ion mobility spectrometry, state-selected ion chemistry, and other applications.

Dr. Mustapha Laatiaoui came to Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) in February 2018. In late 2018, he received an ERC Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council (ERC), one of the European Union's most valuable funding grants, for his research into the heaviest elements using laser spectroscopy and ion mobility spectroscopy. The current publications also included work that Laatiaoui had previously carried out at GSI in Darmstadt and at KU Leuven in Belgium.

This work was conducted in cooperation with Alexei A. Buchachenko from the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology and the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, both in Moscow, Russia, and Larry A. Viehland from Chatham University, Pittsburgh, USA. (CP)

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news-3654 Mon, 13 Jul 2020 09:47:00 +0200 Interactive image comparison: FAIR construction site https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3654&cHash=b90b25a3f1484be9d055570b49d88151 An interactive picture slider provides new insights and shows the progress on the FAIR construction site. It allows to compare the pictures from the beginning of construction and today. The virtual superimposition of the images makes the process of building the large particle accelerator facility clearly visible. An interactive picture slider provides new insights and shows the progress on the FAIR construction site. It allows to compare the pictures from the beginning of construction and today. The virtual superimposition of the images makes the process of building the large particle accelerator facility clearly visible.

Several important stages in the construction process can be seen in the picture slider: The tunnel for the SIS100 accelerator ring is under construction, and the transfer building is growing out of the ground. The first experimental cave, the building for the Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment (CBM) is also taking shape. Viewers can compare the FAIR construction site in 2018 and 2020 themselves.
The drone images were taken during the regular overflights during which the drone videos are recorded to document the construction site. All drone videos can be found here.

FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, is one of the largest research projects worldwide. FAIR will be used to create and study matter in the laboratory that otherwise only occurs in the universe. Scientists from all over the world expect new insights into the structure of matter and the development of the universe, from the Big Bang to the present day. (LW)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3656 Fri, 10 Jul 2020 12:54:00 +0200 Member of the Bundestag Marcus Bühl visits FAIR and GSI https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3656&cHash=f5dac229907b94391bce56c13efe412f The progress of the FAIR project and the current scientific activities on the campus were the central topics during the visit of Marcus Bühl, a member of the Bundestag. The politician comes from Ilmenau and belongs to the AfD party. He is member of the budget committee of the Bundestag and deputy member of the committee on the digital agenda. He was received by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director, and Jörg Blaurock, The progress of the FAIR project and the current scientific activities on the campus were the central topics during the visit of Marcus Bühl, a member of the Bundestag. The politician comes from Ilmenau and belongs to the AfD party. He is member of the budget committee of the Bundestag and deputy member of the committee on the digital agenda. He was received by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Dr. Ulrich Breuer, Administrative Managing Director, and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director, as well as Ingo Peter, the Head of Public Relations.

In addition to information on scientific activities and the current status of the FAIR project, a tour of the FAIR construction site was part of the program. During a walking tour Marcus Bühl was provided with insights into the existing accelerator and research facilities on the GSI and FAIR campus. He visited the test facility for superconducting accelerator magnets, where high-tech components for FAIR are examined, the Experimental Storage Ring ESR, the therapy unit for tumor treatment using carbon ions as well as the large detector HADES and the high-performance data center Green IT Cube.

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3652 Mon, 06 Jul 2020 12:03:00 +0200 Diversity and inclusion — Centers of Helmholtz Association adopt joint guideline https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3652&cHash=d282edca72c830b62bbd6bceda1c86c9 The centers of the Helmholtz Association have agreed to develop and live a common understanding of diversity, inclusion and a diversity-aware organizational culture. Recently all 19 members of the Helmholtz Association, among them also the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, have officially adopted a corresponding guideline in their Assembly of Members. The centers of the Helmholtz Association have agreed to develop and live a common understanding of diversity, inclusion and a diversity-aware organizational culture. Recently all 19 members of the Helmholtz Association, among them also the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, have officially adopted a corresponding guideline in their Assembly of Members.

In large research infrastructures such as GSI, which has maintained strong international collaborations since its foundation, or the FAIR project, which is supported by several countries, cooperation with different people and cultures has long been part of everyday life. In this way, knowledge and know-how from all over the world can be brought together for research and high-tech developments in order to achieve the best results. The basis for this is now written down in the Helmholtz guideline in order to create the framework conditions for reflecting diversity and inclusion in the processes, structures and conditions of the center.

The starting point is a simple insight: people are diverse. The current 40,000 employees of the Helmholtz Association and, of course, the approximately 1450 employees of GSI and FAIR differ from each other in many ways: in their personal life plan or personal life situation, their gender, their world view, their biography and origins, their abilities and inclinations, their external appearance and many other aspects. The Helmholtz members recognize this sum of human differences, which is optionally referred to as "diversity" or "variety", as an irrefutable fact.

Inclusion is understood to mean the active shaping of the organizational culture in order to take all persons into account and to give them equal opportunities for influence, participation and individual development. Successful inclusion is demonstrated by the fact that the people who work in and with the centers experience an atmosphere of respect and fairness, appreciation and belonging, security and openness, and are convinced that they can fully develop their talents and grow personally. (CP)

Further information:
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news-3646 Mon, 29 Jun 2020 08:17:00 +0200 Holthusen Award for Thomas Friedrich https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3646&cHash=7d6a21ebb8e0f3d95eaa32d1fd1ef3b9 The physicist Dr. Thomas Friedrich from GSI’s biophysics department is laureate of the Hermann Holthusen Award 2020. The science prize is awarded by the German Society for Radiooncology (DEGRO) for outstanding habilitation theses in the field of radiotherapy, radiobiology, medical radiation physics and technology. With this award the society honours the excellent scientific quality of Thomas Friedrich's work. The physicist Dr. Thomas Friedrich from GSI’s biophysics department is laureate of the Hermann Holthusen Award 2020. The science prize is awarded by the German Society for Radiooncology (DEGRO) for outstanding habilitation theses in the field of radiotherapy, radiobiology, medical radiation physics and technology. With this award the society honours the excellent scientific quality of Thomas Friedrich's work.

Thomas Friedrich investigates how to describe the effect of radiation on cells and tissue as a function of their physical properties such as type of radiation, dose and energy. His habilitation thesis particularly focuses on the description and prediction of the increased effect of ion beams. This is an important aspect especially in tumor therapy with charged particles. His contributions in this area are concerned with the development of a corresponding mathematical formalism, and generally with methods and strategies for evaluating and testing such models. 

Based on the "Local Effect Model" developed at GSI and used in particle therapy since years, it was possible to demonstrate the consistency of the developed modelling approaches by applying them to other types of radiation. For this purpose, it was demonstrated that various radiation effects can be described and predicted according to different irradiation scenarios using a uniform concept. This covers a wide range of sorts of ions and particle energies – from almost stopping particles to very fast particles with high energies. Those energies will be provided with unprecedented possibilities by the future accelerator center FAIR, currently being built at GSI.

The methods and results of Thomas Friedrich's award-winning research work are also a contribution to translational research at the border between experimental and clinical science. He thus connects basic research and clinical application of research results.

Thomas Friedrich studied at the Technical University of Darmstadt and received his doctorate from the Institute of Nuclear Physics. In 2008, he joined GSI as a postdoc in the Biophysics Department. Since then he has been working in the field of biophysical modelling for the prediction of radiation effects. Since 2015 he has been working here as a Senior Scientist. He has already received numerous scholarships and awards for his research, including the Young Scientist Award of the German Society for Biological Radiation Research. In addition to his research activities at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Thomas Friedrich teaches as a lecturer at the TU Darmstadt’s Department of Physics, where he offers basic lectures in Physics as well as advanced courses in the field of radiation biophysics. He also supervises bachelor, master and doctoral theses.

Together with Thomas Friedrich, the radiation oncologist Dr. Constantinos Zamboglou from the University Hospital in Freiburg is awarded the Holthusen Prize 2020. He is involved in preclinical and clinical studies on the implementation of special imaging techniques in the treatment planning of patients with prostate cancer. (BP)

Further information

More about the Hermann Holthusen Award (in German)

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news-3648 Wed, 24 Jun 2020 07:45:00 +0200 Green IT Cube receives eco label — Blue Angel for high-performance data center of FAIR and GSI https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3648&cHash=37500cb6ccd6ea1d2fa52ef1e5873a01 The high-performance data center of GSI and FAIR, the Green IT Cube, was awarded the “Blue Angel” as a label of special environmental friendliness. Currently, this makes it the only data center to receive the eco label of the German government. Thanks to a special cooling system, it is particularly energy efficient and conserves resources. The Green IT Cube is one of the most powerful scientific data centers in the world. The high-performance data center of GSI and FAIR, the Green IT Cube, was awarded the “Blue Angel” as a label of special environmental friendliness. Currently, this makes it the only data center to receive the eco label of the German government. Thanks to a special cooling system, it is particularly energy efficient and conserves resources. The Green IT Cube is one of the most powerful scientific data centers in the world. It will provide enormous computing capacities for experiments at the accelerator facilities of GSI and, in the future, FAIR.

The Green IT Cube was built at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt and was financed with funds from the German Federal Government and the State of Hesse via Helmholtz investments in further expansion. The concept allows the realization and the particularly efficient operation of computer centers for large-scale research facilities, such as the international accelerator facility FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) being built at GSI.

"The Green IT Cube is an exceptionally energy-efficient data center because the energy required for cooling the computers is very low compared to conventional data centers," explained Dr. Helmut Kreiser, who is head of the data centers on the GSI/FAIR campus. "The Green IT Cube cools its computers with an innovative air and water method. As a result, the energy required for cooling is less than seven percent of the electrical power used for computing, instead of 30 up to 100 percent as is the case in conventional data centers with air cooling".

The effective cooling technology allows a space-saving placement of the computers in the Green IT Cube. In a cube-shaped building measuring 27 x 30 x 22 cubic meters, 768 computer racks in total can be arranged closely together on six floors. At present, two of the six floors are equipped with a maximum cooling power of four megawatts. In the final stage the Green IT Cube will be able to reach a cooling power of twelve megawatts. Due to saving energy and space, it is very cost-efficient. In addition, the waste heat of the Green IT Cube’s servers is already being used to heat a modern office and canteen building on the GSI/FAIR campus.

The technology was developed by Professor Volker Lindenstruth from Goethe University Frankfurt and at that time head of GSI-IT, and Professor Horst Stöcker, also from Goethe University and at that time Scientific Managing Director of GSI, in cooperation with the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS). The powerful concept has already won several awards for innovation and environmental friendliness.

"We are very happy and of course proud to receive such a well-known and renowned label as the Blue Angel for our data center," said Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Managing Director of FAIR and GSI. "The technology for the cooling system is not only an example of the competence and the inventive spirit of our scientists, but also of the potential of a research center like ours to contribute to improving even already established technology in terms of sustainability and efficiency. Pursuing and expanding this potential is a major concern of our research at GSI and FAIR".

Scientists use the Green IT Cube to perform simulations and develop detectors for FAIR. They also analyze measurement data recorded in experiments at the accelerator facilities at GSI and, in the future, FAIR, to gain fundamental insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe. To this end, the Green IT Cube will be equipped in the long term with computer systems that meet the scientists' requirements in terms of computing power, storage capacity and access speed.

For over 40 years, the Blue Angel has been the environmental label of the German Federal Government and an orientation for sustainable purchasing. Independent and credible, it sets demanding standards for environmentally friendly products and services. The Blue Angel guarantees that products and services awarded with it meet high requirements of environmental, health and usage properties. The entire life cycle must always be taken into account in the assessment. For each product group, criteria are developed which products and services labelled with the Blue Angel must fulfil. To reflect technical developments, the German Environment Agency reviews the criteria every three to four years. In this way companies are required to make their products increasingly environmentally friendly. The Green IT Cube is the first data center to receive the eco label of the German government on the basis of the criteria changed in 2019. (CP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3644 Mon, 08 Jun 2020 08:41:00 +0200 FAIR storage ring CRYRING ready for use https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3644&cHash=a8bda0cb9e7a2f08a79806283899c434 The first FAIR storage ring, the so-called CRYRING, is ready to conduct experiments for the scientific research community. CRYRING is an extremely successful ion storage ring that has enabled key research contributions in atomic and molecular physics in Stockholm for many years. It was brought to GSI and FAIR in Darmstadt as a Swedish in-kind contribution. The first FAIR storage ring, the so-called CRYRING, is ready to conduct experiments for the scientific research community. CRYRING is an extremely successful ion storage ring that has enabled key research contributions in atomic and molecular physics in Stockholm for many years. It was brought to GSI and FAIR in Darmstadt as a Swedish in-kind contribution. Here it was modernized, adapted to FAIR standards and connected to the experimental storage ring ESR at GSI under the project name "CRYRING@ESR". Along with the already existing trapping facility HITRAP, the ESR and the future high-energy storage ring HESR, CRYRING will be part of the unique portfolio of trapping and storage facilities for heavy ions of FAIR.

CRYRING is a facility for storing highly charged heavy ions at low beam energy. With its high vacuum, the storage ring is particularly suitable for storing and cooling the ions at low energies. With low-energy ions, experiments of the highest precision, but also in a previously unattained regime of slow, adiabatic collisions are possible, allowing us to gain new insights into atomic, astrophysical and nuclear physics processes.

The recommissioning of CRYRING was started in 2015. In 2017, ion beams could be stored for the first time, initially from a local source. In recent years, work has been carried out on the optimization of the ring operation, beam cooling and diagnosis, the new FAIR control system and the experimental infrastructure. Commissioning is now nearing completion and has progressed so far that the facility is ready to serve scientific experiments.

Various experiments by scientific users with international participation were already planned for this spring at the CRYRING. However, due to the corona pandemic they had to be cancelled for the time being and postponed to future operating periods. Nevertheless, work continued on the full commissioning of the facility. This involved not only transporting highly charged, heavy lead ions (beryllium-like Pb78+ and later also Pb82+ with completely removed electron shell) from the GSI linear accelerator UNILAC via the ring accelerator SIS-18 and the experimental storage ring ESR to CRYRING, but also storing, cooling and using them for tests of the experimental infrastructure. The lifetimes and electron cooling of the stored beams were in line with previous estimates.

In the first tests, X-ray detectors at the so-called electron cooler registered the characteristic X-ray spectrum of the highly charged heavy ions, which is of particular interest for the fundamental understanding of the electromagnetic force in extremely strong fields (quantum electrodynamics). Ions stored in the CRYRING fly through a cold, dense cloud of electrons of the same speed in the electron cooler, which is primarily used for beam cooling. A secondary side effect is that also a small fraction of the ions capture an electron from the cloud and release the energy gained in this process as X-rays. Researchers can use this radiation to study quantum electrodynamics.

Due to the twelve-sided geometry of the CRYRING, the X-ray detectors can be placed in an ideal position exactly on the axis in front of and behind the ion beam and yet very close to the interaction area with the cooling electrons. This largely eliminates uncertainties in the observation angle caused by the Doppler shift. The low beam energy of the stored ions already helps to reduce this shift per se, so that X-ray spectra can be recorded with unprecedented precision and clarity.

For the future, it is planned to reschedule the experiments that could currently not be conducted due to COVID-19 as soon as possible. Furthermore, a completion of the commissioning is planned. For this purpose, the extraction process will be implemented, which will allow the cooled, slowed-down ions to be removed from the ring and enable material and biophysical experiments with solid targets. (CP)

Further information:
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3642 Tue, 02 Jun 2020 09:30:00 +0200 New measurement exacerbates old problem https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3642&cHash=9e654e7e56812b443c0ecae8cc456ea4 Two prominent X-ray emission lines of highly charged iron have puzzled astrophysicists for decades: their measured and calculated brightness ratios always disagree. This hinders good determinations of plasma temperatures and densities. New, careful high-precision measurements, together with top-level calculations now exclude all hitherto proposed explanations for this discrepancy, and thus deepen the problem. Researchers from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt and the Helmholtz Ins This news is based on a press release of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics Heidelberg.

Two prominent X-ray emission lines of highly charged iron have puzzled astrophysicists for decades: their measured and calculated brightness ratios always disagree. This hinders good determinations of plasma temperatures and densities. New, careful high-precision measurements, together with top-level calculations now exclude all hitherto proposed explanations for this discrepancy, and thus deepen the problem. Researchers from the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt and the Helmholtz Institute Jena (HIJ), a branch of GSI, are also involved in the investigations. The results are now published in the prestigious “Physical Review Letters” journal.

Hot astrophysical plasmas fill the intergalactic space, and brightly shine in stellar coronae, active galactic nuclei, and supernova remnants. They contain charged atoms (ions) that emit X-rays observable by satellite-borne instruments. Astrophysicists need their spectral lines to derive parameters such as plasma temperatures or elemental abundancies. Two of the brightest X-ray lines arise from iron atoms that have lost 16 of their 26 electrons, Fe16+ ions – also known in astrophysics as Fe XVII. Iron is rather abundant in the universe; it lets stars similar to our Sun burn their hydrogen fuel very slowly for billions of years by nearly stopping the energy flowing as radiation from the fiery fusion core to the, in comparison only mildly hot, stellar surface.

For more than forty years, X-ray astronomers have been bothered by a serious problem with the two key Fe16+ lines: the ratio of their measured intensities significantly disagrees with theoretical predictions. This also holds for laboratory measurements, but uncertainties in experiment and theory have been too large for settling the issue.

An international team of 32 researchers led by groups from the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has just published the outcome of its renewed massive effort to resolve this discrepancy. They have performed both the highest-resolution measurements thus far reported, and several top-level quantum-theoretical calculations.

Steffen Kühn, PhD student at MPIK and responsible for the setup, describes the effort: “To resonantly excite highly charged iron ions, we continuously generate them with our compact mobile electron beam ion trap (PolarX-EBIT) and irradiate them with X-rays from the PETRA III synchrotron at DESY. We find resonance with the lines by scanning the synchrotron energy over the range where they should appear and observing the fluorescence light. To handle the experimental data flow, we had colleagues from 19 institutions working at DESY, and painstakingly analysing and cross-checking results for more than one year.”

To make sure that everything is consistent, the researchers combined three different measurement procedures to determine the intensity ratio of the two Fe16+ lines, dubbed 3C and 3D. First, overall scans revealed line positions, widths and intensities. Second, the experimentalists set the energy of the X-ray photons to match the peak fluorescence yield while cyclically turning the photon beam off and on to get rid of the strong background. Third, they scanned the lines again, but using the on-off trick at the same time in order to reduce instrumental effects. “This way, we could derive the presently most accurate value of the brightness ratio, and this with ten times higher spectral resolution than earlier work”, states Chintan Shah, NASA postdoctoral fellow. “And the properties of the PETRA III beam avoided possible non-linear effects depending on the flux of synchrotron photons that may have affected earlier measurements”, adds Sven Bernitt, researcher at the Helmholtz Institute Jena and one of the project leaders, who is working in the group of Thomas Stöhlker, HIJ Director and Deputy Research Director of GSI and FAIR. Remarkably, the resulting intensity ratio confirms earlier astrophysical and laboratory measurements with much reduced uncertainty.

Theory teams around Natalia Oreshkina at the MPIK, from Australia, USA and Russia applied three independent very-large-scale relativistic quantum-theoretical methods, letting clusters of hundreds of processors run hot for weeks. This computational marathon delivered concordant results at high numerical precision. However, while the calculated energy difference between the two lines agrees well with the measured value, the intensity ratio clearly departs from the experimental result. “There are no other known quantum-mechanical effects or numerical uncertainties to consider within our approaches”, emphasizes Marianna Safronova, professor at the University of Delaware.

Thus, the cause for the discrepancy between the experimental and theoretical intensity ratios of the 3C and 3D lines of Fe16+ remains puzzling, since also all effects that could perturb the measurements were as far as possible suppressed, and the remaining uncertainty understood. As a consequence, astrophysical parameters derived on the basis of X-ray line intensities are, to some degree, uncertain. While this is unsatisfactory, “the new accurate experimental result may be immediately used to empirically correct the astrophysical models”, recommends Maurice Leutenegger, also a NASA researcher. “Upcoming space missions with advanced X-ray instrumentation, such as ESA's Athena X-ray Observatory, will soon start sending an incredible stream of high-resolution data to ground, and we have to be prepared to understand it and squeeze the maximum value from those billion-dollar investments.” (MPI/BP)

Further information:

Scientific publication in the journal Physical Review Letters

Press release of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg

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news-3640 Tue, 19 May 2020 13:54:32 +0200 CBM Collaboration awards two PhD students https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3640&cHash=9641d192f59f3dc854fc7e75d79682a4 For their doctoral theses at GSI and FAIR, Dr. Hanna Malygina and Dr. Ievgenii Kres received the dissertation prize of the CBM collaboration for outstanding final theses in 2018 and 2019. The prizes were awarded at the 35th CBM Collaboration Meeting from March 23 to 27, which was held as a video conference due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The prize for the best thesis of 2018 was awarded to Hanna Malygina from the University of Frankfurt. In her final thesis entitled "Hit reconstruction for the Silicon Tracking System of the CBM experiment" she developed algorithms for the Silicon Tracking System (STS), where particle tracks can be measured with high efficiency and good momentum resolution. A model of the detector response was designed and implemented into the CBM software framework.

Ievgenii Kres from the University of Wuppertal was awarded the thesis prize 2019 for his work entitled "Optimization of the CBM-RICH detector geometry and its use for the reconstruction of neutral mesons using conversion method". He developed an optimized geometry for the RICH detector and was able to show that the new geometry leads to improved performance in the identification of dileptons.

Since 2015, the PhD prize has been awarded by the CBM collaboration for the best dissertation of a year produced in the CBM experiment. An international committee consisting of scientists from the collaboration selects the prize winners. The award is intended to particularly acknowledge the contribution of PhD students to the CBM project and is endowed with a prize money of 500€.

The CBM experiment is one of the key experiments at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). It focuses on the investigation of high-density nuclear matter, as it exists in neutron stars and in the core of supernova explosions. More than 400 researchers from 66 institutes and 13 countries work together in the collaboration. (JL)

 

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news-3638 Mon, 18 May 2020 11:00:00 +0200 Million Euro agreement for research signed between GSI and JINR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3638&cHash=edc5ae79b693c26997c28a018f9e9e02 Intensifying research cooperation, strengthening cutting-edge research and promoting young researchers – these are some of the key goals of the "German-Russian Roadmap for Cooperation in Education, Science, Research and Innovation", which Germany and Russia agreed in December 2018. An important step in this context was the signing of an agreement between the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). Intensifying research cooperation, strengthening cutting-edge research and promoting young researchers – these are some of the key goals of the "German-Russian Roadmap for Cooperation in Education, Science, Research and Innovation", which Germany and Russia agreed in December 2018. An important step in this context was the signing of an agreement between the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR).

One of the goals of the German-Russian Roadmap is to expand cooperation at major research infrastructures in Russia. One of the projects identified for this is the instrumentation and scientific usage of the future accelerator complex NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility), currently being built in Dubna at JINR. The German contributions to this cooperation are financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and handled by GSI. For this purpose, a cooperation agreement between JINR and GSI has been worked out, which has a total volume of about 20 million Euros. It was signed in early February in Moscow during the "Helmholtz Winter Talks 2020", a traditional event for the exchange of views between decision-makers from politics, science and society in Russia and Germany.

The agreement on technical cooperation between GSI and JINR consists of several subprojects: coordination and technical follow-up, stochastic cooling for the NICA collider, silicon tracking system for the NICA experiment BM@N as well as read-out electronics and data acquisition for this experiment, research and development for the superconducting high intensity ion injector Linacs@JINR and finally beam diagnostics and LLRF electronics for linear accelerators. As the next step, the details of these six subprojects are currently being worked out.

Professor Paolo Giubellino, who signed the agreement together with Professor Vladimir Kekelidze, JINR Vice-Director for the NICA science project, said: "I am very pleased about the new cooperation, which can build on an already existing, very solid foundation between our two institutes". The collaboration between GSI and JINR has a long tradition and includes both research at the existing accelerator and experimental facilities of both partners as well as research and development activities for future research infrastructures such as the two accelerator centers FAIR and NICA, which are currently being built at GSI in Darmstadt and at JINR in Dubna. "The agreement offers excellent opportunities to further strengthen our cooperation in the future and to open up promising new perspectives in research and technological innovation”. (BP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3636 Mon, 11 May 2020 10:50:00 +0200 Horst Klein Award for Bernhard Franzke https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3636&cHash=9a2f5a3c67ecd5094ce565e3f7918846 Dr. Bernhard Franzke receives the Horst Klein Award for his outstanding scientific achievements in the field of accelerator physics. Bernhard Franzke has been a leading accelerator physicist at GSI for many years and was significantly involved in the construction and development of UNILAC, the ESR and many experiments. In the years 2000 until 2005 he was significantly involved in developing the concept of storage rings at FAIR Dr. Bernhard Franzke receives the Horst Klein Award for his outstanding scientific achievements in the field of accelerator physics. Bernhard Franzke has been a leading accelerator physicist at GSI for many years and was significantly involved in the construction and development of UNILAC, the ESR and many experiments. In the years 2000 until 2005 he was significantly involved in developing the concept of storage rings at FAIR.

As one of the first employees, Dr. Bernhard Franzke started his career at GSI already in 1969. Prior to that, he had studied physics at the University of Heidelberg where he also received his doctorate. During the development and construction of the linear accelerator UNILAC, he made decisive contributions to its optimization. He also developed an ultra-high vacuum technology, which was indispensable for the upcoming accelerator projects at GSI.
During the first upgrade of GSI, Bernhard Franzke was involved in the conceptual design of the ring accelerator SIS18, the experimental storage ring ESR and the fragment separator FRS. As project manager he was mainly responsible for the development and construction of the ESR, an innovative facility which contributes in an essential way to the uniqueness of GSI now and FAIR in the future. His ultra-high vacuum technology made it possible to decelerate heavy ions in the ESR to low energies at high intensities – a unique property of the ESR that was important for many experiments and is indispensable for future operation in combination with CRYRING. Bernhard Franzke's many years of commitment as group leader of the ESR and head of the accelerator division as well as his developments in accelerator physics and technology contributed decisively to the success of the ESR. Bernhard Franzke was also involved in the first design of the FAIR facility. He led the conceptual design of the storage rings for FAIR. He retired in 2005, but is still active as a consultant.

The Horst Klein Prize, named after the physicist Prof. Dr. Horst Klein (1931-2012), is awarded annually by the Frankfurt Physical Society, the Department of Physics at Goethe University Frankfurt and the Working Group Accelerator Physics (AKBP) of the German Physical Society. The Horst Klein Research Prize is aimed at internationally renowned scientists who have distinguished themselves through outstanding achievements of great significance and high originality. The prize is endowed with 5,000 euros. It is offered by the Goethe University of Frankfurt, the Fückstiftung, Professors Schempp and Schmidt-Böcking, as well as Pfeiffer Vacuum. The official award ceremony, which was to take place during this year's spring meeting of the German Physical Society, has been postponed due to the corona pandemic.

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news-3634 Tue, 05 May 2020 08:32:00 +0200 Full speed ahead for production of acceleration systems for FAIR ring accelerator SIS100 https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3634&cHash=e4c753f1c2ccbdfec34abe7917308c5b In February, a delegation of GSI/FAIR near Darmstadt visited the RI Research Instruments GmbH premises in Bergisch Gladbach to inspect the assembly of the SIS100 acceleration systems, so-called accelerator cavities, the company has been contracted to produce for the international accelerator facility FAIR. From a total of 14 ferrite loaded cavities, six systems have now been assembled, three of which have also been acceptance tested. In February, a delegation of GSI/FAIR near Darmstadt visited the RI Research Instruments GmbH premises in Bergisch Gladbach to inspect the assembly of the SIS100 acceleration systems, so-called accelerator cavities, the company has been contracted to produce for the international accelerator facility FAIR. From a total of 14 ferrite loaded cavities, six systems have now been assembled, three of which have also been acceptance tested. The 14 cavities will be installed in the FAIR ring accelerator with a circumference of 1,100 meters and located 17 meters below the Earth’s surface. At FAIR, matter that usually only exists in the depth of space will be produced in a lab for research. Scientists from all over the world will be able to gain new insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present.

The FAIR ring accelerator is supplied by the existing GSI accelerator facilities, which serve as injectors. Since the facility accelerates ions – charged atomic nuclei – of all elements from hydrogen to uranium, the cavities must be particularly variable in producing the acceleration frequencies. They generate a radiofrequency field that can accelerate the ions up to 99% of the speed of light. By manipulating the frequency, the ions in the ring can, for example, be packed into different numbers of bunches – suitable for the experiment to be performed with them after acceleration.

The order for the production of the 14 cavities is executed by RI together with Ampegon Power Electronics AG as subcontractor and has now resulted in a successful technology transfer of the ferrite-loaded cavity. RI will build two such acceleration systems for a heavy ion cancer therapy machine for a first industrial customer in the USA.

RI is convinced by the design and concept of the state-of-the-art accelerator system and is thankful for the trust GSI has shown RI, enabling the company to offer this concept to other industrial customers. (CP)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3632 Tue, 28 Apr 2020 10:00:00 +0200 FAIR project: Contract awarding for shell constructions on the southern construction site https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3632&cHash=17be064698402d2d9a53ad96cab07ca7 Another important stage in the FAIR mega project is starting. While the shell construction in the construction area north is progressing continuously, a first major package has now been awarded for the southern construction site. This marks the next decisive steps in the realization of the future accelerator center FAIR, currently being built at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt. Another important stage in the FAIR mega project is starting. While the shell construction in the construction area north is progressing continuously, a first major package has now been awarded for the southern construction site. This marks the next decisive steps in the realization of the future accelerator center FAIR, currently being built at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt.

This major contract in a three-digit million euro range was awarded to the consortium of the companies Züblin and Strabag in Germany. The construction work include the shell constructions for six buildings and a unique experimental facility – the Superconducting Fragment Separator (Super FRS).

Following the construction work already underway in the northern area for the future experiment CBM, one of the four central pillars of the FAIR research program, the construction of a further decisive research area with outstanding discovery potential for science is being started now. The Super FRS will focus on research topics concerning the nuclear structure and interactions of extremely rare, exotic particles. These new isotopes will be produced with highest intensities, separated at the Super FRS and will be made available for world unique experiments to study cosmic matter in the laboratory.

In order to realize this outstanding research infrastructure, the award package also includes the shell construction for further experimental and supply buildings as well as for transfer lines for the beams. The Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Jörg Blaurock, emphasized: “With the current contract, we are implementing a further building block of our award strategy, which is customized for the mega-project FAIR, in accordance with our planning. Now the second large construction area in the south of the FAIR site and further parts of the high-tech production are moving into focus on our way to the realization of FAIR. We will also continue with our already established integrated overall planning in close cooperation with our partners in planning and execution."

Simultaneously and closely coordinated with the progress on the construction site, the development and production of the corresponding high-tech components continues, items which are required in particular for the Super FRS. For example, these include special high-performance power converters and superconducting magnet units that later will be used in the Super FRS for beam correction to achieve a high-precision particle beam.

The FAIR project is one of the world’s biggest construction projects for international cutting-edge research. In total, the highly complex FAIR accelerator facility will comprise more than 20 structures on a site of approximately 150,000 square meters. Around two million cubic meters of soil will be moved and 600,000 cubic meters of concrete and 65,000 tons of reinforcing steel will be used for the construction project. Scientists from all over the world will use FAIR to gain new insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe with outstanding experiments. (BP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3630 Thu, 16 Apr 2020 09:30:00 +0200 GSI/FAIR research supports the fight against corona https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3630&cHash=abe9f7ae3e9c5b3ce0bb0a39bb26162b GSI/FAIR uses its research potential and unique infrastructure to contribute to the management of the current corona pandemic. In several areas at GSI/FAIR, scientists are working to provide new insights and technologies that may help to fight the corona virus SARS-CoV-2. To this aim, the accelerators and laboratories on the Darmstadt campus are also being used. The laboratory is operational, while strictly abiding to safety regulations. GSI/FAIR uses its research potential and unique infrastructure to contribute to the management of the current corona pandemic. In several areas at GSI/FAIR, scientists are working to provide new insights and technologies that may help to fight the corona virus SARS-CoV-2. To this aim, the accelerators and laboratories on the Darmstadt campus are also being used. The laboratory is operational, while strictly abiding to safety regulations.

Four projects are currently being developed to exploit the possibilities of GSI and FAIR research in the corona crisis and to expand the fundamental knowledge about the virus. The researchers are working on contributions to the development of vaccines as well as on therapeutic low-dose irradiation options for pneumonia caused by SARS-CoV-2. Other projects aim at the development of faster and optimized virus detection and at the possibility of producing improved viral filtration masks.

As always, GSI/FAIR actively cooperates with other research centers: one of the measures involves collaboration with the Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (HZI) in Braunschweig, another is in cooperation with the University Hospitals in Frankfurt and Erlangen. The other two projects are developed in cooperation with universities in the USA and Argentina as well as the University Hospital Gießen-Marburg and the company TransMIT GmbH in Gießen.

Overview of the four specific projects:

Ion radiation for vaccine development

In order to develop vaccines using inactivated viruses, researchers need methods that inactivate the virus while causing as little damage to its structure as possible — in particular the viral envelope that is the key to the immune response. In past years, the inactivation of viruses for vaccine development has been carried out with conventional gamma radiation. However, the use of high doses of gamma rays inevitably leads to damage of the structural-and membrane-associated proteins of the virus that should be recognized by the immune system following vaccination to promote efficient protection. The new project therefore plans to irradiate influenza and SARS-CoV-2 viruses with high-energy heavy ions. Energetic ions are able to inactivate the virus by inducing breaks in the viral RNA with only a few passages in the envelope, thus minimizing membrane damage. The resulting viruses will then be examined at the HZI in Braunschweig for their ability to promote the formation of virus-binding and neutralizing antibodies after vaccination.

Therapeutic effect of low-dose radiation in SARS-CoV-2 induced pneumonia

In a preclinical study, GSI researchers plan to examine whether pneumonia caused by SARS-CoV-2 can be treated with low-dose radiation. Partners are the University Hospitals in Frankfurt and Erlangen. For this purpose, the anti-inflammatory effects in the lung will be compared under two alternative conditions: One is the use of a typical low-dose X-ray radiation, as it has already been administered in the past for the treatment of pneumonia, the other is the use of an increased radon activity compared to the environmental activity. The scientists hope to gain insights into the stage of the disease at which this might be a suitable approach. It is also important to find a balance between the desired anti-inflammatory effect in the lungs and undesired immunosuppressive, systemic effects of the radiation. In this way, mild exposure to radon could be used as a moderate immunomodulator.

Improved and fast virus detection with single nanopore membranes

GSI is working together with international partners on the development of highly sensitive sensors based on nanopores. These sensors have the potential to detect viruses such as SARS-CoV-2 selectively and quickly. For this purpose, a membrane with a single nanopore provides excellent detection conditions. At the GSI accelerator facility, polymer foils are irradiated with individual ions. Chemical etching of a single ion track creates a single nanopore whose geometry and diameter can be adjusted very precisely. In cooperation with external groups, the surface of the nanopores is specifically functionalized in order to monitor the transport of specific particles, molecules or even viruses through the nanopore. Sensors based on nanopores have the potential for high sensitivity and fast detection response. Together with the collaboration partners, opportunities are currently being investigated to support research projects for the detection of viruses such as SARS-CoV-2 or specific filtration processes using the track-etched GSI membranes.

Ion-track membranes with tailored nanopores for viral filtration masks

In this project it is planned to use track-etched nanopores to develop safe respiratory protection filters and thus improve breathing masks. At GSI, corresponding polymer foils with monodisperse and oriented nanopores are produced by ion irradiation and subsequent chemical track-etching. The diameter of the pores can be tailored exactly to size. With an adjustable diameter up to 20 nanometers, such nanopores are significantly smaller than the size of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The radiation process at the GSI accelerator facility also allows the number of nanopores to be precisely adjusted (up to about 10 billion per cm2). Together with the collaboration partners, GSI scientists are currently discussing possibilities to investigate the suitability and optimal parameters of track-etched membranes as filters for respiratory masks. Respiratory masks optimized in this way could provide better protection against a virus infection in pandemic situations. (BP/IP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3628 Tue, 07 Apr 2020 09:00:00 +0200 Cooperation agreement despite corona crisis — European XFEL and FAIR sign contract in video conference https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3628&cHash=101d2559d5bb5ab0a2dd6fff348cb100 A cooperation agreement, a so-called "Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)", was recently signed by the international free-electron X-ray laser European XFEL and the international accelerator center FAIR. Due to the corona crisis, the signing took place in a joint video conference of the involved parties. A cooperation agreement, a so-called "Memorandum of Understanding (MoU)", was recently signed by the international free-electron X-ray laser European XFEL and the international accelerator center FAIR. Due to the corona crisis, the signing took place in a joint video conference of the involved parties. This was preceded by a virtual seminar talk by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Director of GSI and FAIR, and Jörg Blaurock, Technical Director of GSI and FAIR, on the status and prospects of the FAIR project. Talk and ceremony were attended by more than 60 video conference participants. European XFEL and FAIR have a lot in common, being both accelerator-based research laboratories serving a broad international community. Both are owned by international shareholders, with a primary role, after Germany, of the Russian Federation. They are both landmarks in the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI).

Within the framework of the cooperation, FAIR and European XFEL intend to share and promote their best practices, knowledge and results, for example by organizing joint scientific and technical events such as workshops or seminars. An exchange is planned both in administrative and organizational areas such as the cost structure or dealing with scientific users, and in the scientific environment through joint research and development projects or the secondment of personnel.

In the MoU, both partners acknowledge the importance of cooperation between Big Science projects in administration and technology as a key factor increasing competitiveness in the development of both social and economic systems and for the improvement of living standards in them. By strengthening cooperation, the MoU aims to exploit synergies in industrial cooperation and to support the achievement of scientific and technological results that promote technological innovation and socio-economic developments.

"With the Memorandum of Understanding, we are opening up new opportunities for fruitful cooperation between European XFEL and FAIR on many different levels. We look forward to joint activities and a lively exchange of ideas among colleagues," Professor Paolo Giubellino explained. Jörg Blaurock added: "In addition to the administrative and scientific collaboration, at FAIR, the promotion of the technological side through technology transfer and industrial cooperation is a major concern. Here we want to identify synergies with European XFEL and exploit our joint potential."

European XFEL Managing Director Professor Robert Feidenhans’l said: “European XFEL and FAIR are both international state-of-the-art research facilities serving a broad scientific community. We have a lot of common experiences and research interests and we are very much looking forward to collaborating more closely with our colleagues at FAIR to explore how we can combine our knowledge to advance and enrich international science.”

The agreement will be valid for a period of five years, with the option of an extension for further five years. GSI and FAIR already have a long-standing connection with European XFEL as well as with its founding laboratory and German shareholder, the Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron DESY, which, like GSI, belongs to the Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren. (CP)

Further information:
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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3626 Tue, 31 Mar 2020 12:00:00 +0200 Prestigious European research grant awarded to GSI physicists https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3626&cHash=8ba7df8c29d9de6a1793be257ead4596 The two GSI physicists Marco Durante and Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo have been honored with the prestigious advanced research grant of the European Union. The European Research Council (ERC) awarded them each an "ERC Advanced Grant". The renowned prize underlines the outstanding quality of scientific research at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the future accelerator center FAIR, which is being built there. The two GSI physicists Marco Durante and Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo have been honored with the prestigious advanced research grant of the European Union. The European Research Council (ERC) awarded them each an "ERC Advanced Grant". The renowned prize underlines the outstanding quality of scientific research at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the future accelerator center FAIR, which is being built there. Another "ERC Advanced Grant" goes to Professor Beatriz Jurado from the Centre Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG), who will use the GSI/FAIR facilities for the execution of the experimental part of her project, as outlined in her application.

The grants are funding and acknowledgment in equal measure: They are awarded exclusively on the basis of the scientific excellence of the projects submitted and are aimed at established researchers from all disciplines whose highly innovative projects go considerably beyond the current state of the art and open up new areas of research. They are endowed with a maximum of 2.5 million euros each over a period of five years.

Marco Durante is Head of the GSI Biophysics Research Department and professor at the TU Darmstadt Department of Physics, Institute of Condensed Matter of Physics. He is an internationally recognized expert in the fields of radiation biology and medical physics, especially for therapy with heavy ions and radioprotection in space. He made important scientific progress in the field of biodosimetry of charged particles, optimization of particle therapy, and shielding of heavy ions in space.

In his new project entitled "Biomedical Applications of Radioactive ion Beams (BARB)", Marco Durante intends to further develop tumor treatment with charged particle therapy. “Particle therapy is rapidly growing and is potentially the most effective and precise radiotherapy technique. However, range uncertainty and poor image guidance limit its applications. Improving accuracy is the key to broadening the applicability of particle therapy", explained Marco Durante. This could also allow better treatment of smaller metastases or tumors close to critical structures, and to small targets in non-cancer diseases, such as ventricular ablations in cardiac arrhythmia.

The new idea is to use the same beam for treatment and for imaging during treatment. Radioactive ion beams are the ideal tool, but their intensity is not yet sufficient for therapeutic applications. Only cutting-edge facilities such as FAIR and the "FAIR Phase 0" experimental program underway at GSI/FAIR can generate such intense beams. Marco Durante explained: “With FAIR-phase-0 high-intensity beams of short-lived isotopes of carbon and oxygen nuclei will be used to enable simultaneous treatment and visualization. This can significantly reduce the range uncertainty and further advance the applicability of particle therapy.” The beam will be visualized in the target position using an innovative Gamma-PET detector that will be built by Prof. Katia Parodi at LMU Munich, partner and beneficiary of the BARB project. “BARB is an experiment showing the enormous potential of FAIR. It is indeed a collaboration between the APPA and NUSTAR pillars of the FAIR project”, said Marco Durante.

Marco Durante studied physics and got his PhD at the University Federico II in Italy. His post doc positions took him to the NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas and to the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. During his studies, he specialized in charged particle therapy, cosmic radiation, radiation cytogenetics and radiation biophysics. He has received numerous awards for his research, including the Galileo Galilei prize from the European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics, the IBA Europhysics Prize of the European Physical Society (EPS) and the Bacq & Alexander award of the European Radiation Research Society (ERRS).

More about Professor Marco Durante's research

Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo is Head of the GSI Theory Research Department, professor at the Theory Center of the Institute for Nuclear Physics (Department of physics, TU Darmstadt) and principal investigator of the SFB 1245 “Nuclei: From Fundamental Interactions to Structure and Stars”. He is recognized internationally as an expert in the field of the nucleosynthesis of chemical elements in stars. He was a co-leader of the international collaboration that predicted in 2010 that the synthesis of heavy elements in a neutron star merger leads to a characteristic electromagnetic signal named kilonova. In 2017, space and ground observatories were actually able to detect the predicted electromagnetic signal after the merger of two neutron stars.

In his new project, entitled "Probing r-process nucleosynthesis through its electromagnetic signatures (KILONOVA)" Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo will further develop these approaches. He explained: „The project aims to answer one of the fundamental questions in physics: How and where are the heavy elements from iron to uranium made by the r-process?”

The confirmation of the theoretical predictions on the origin of heavy elements through the observation of gravitational waves of a neutron star merger in combination with characteristic electromagnetic signals in 2017 had provided the sensational first direct indication that r-process elements are produced during neutron star mergers. “Additional events are expected to be detected in the following years. To fully exploit such opportunities it is fundamental to combine an improved description of the exotic neutron-rich nuclei involved in the r-process with sophisticated astrophysical simulations to provide accurate prediction of r-process nucleosynthesis yields and their electromagnetic signals”, explained Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo. These predictions could then be confronted with observations. “Together with the unique experimental capabilities of the GSI/FAIR facility, it constitutes a unique opportunity to advance our understanding of r-process nucleosynthesis.”

Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo studied physics and received his PhD from the Autonomous University of Madrid. He specialized in nuclear structure as well as nuclear astrophysics. As a postdoc, he gained experience at the California Institute of Technology in the USA, followed by research stays of several years at the Aarhus University in Denmark and the University of Basel in Switzerland. His research on the nucleosynthesis of chemical elements in stars has received multiple recognition, including the "Gustav Hertz Preis" of the German Physical Society (DPG) “for the discovery of a new nucleosynthesis process: The νp-process”.

More about Professor Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo's research

The two research colleagues Marco Durante and Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo also emphasized: “We are grateful to the European Research Council for giving us a great opportunity with its funding and we look forward to working together in our respective teams. Our aim is to go significantly beyond the current state of research with our projects and to open up new, forward-looking areas of research. The future accelerator center FAIR and the already existing experimental program are central building blocks for this and will enable us to do so many pioneering things".

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino emphasized: "It is a fantastic achievement. I am extremely pleased about the recognition of these outstanding scientists who, with their innovative projects and their commitment, are tackling important challenges in nuclear physics and medical physics. The grants demonstrate the outstanding quality of scientific research at GSI and FAIR. They go to two of our flagship fields: nuclear astrophysics and biomedical applications of nuclear physics. In addition, the grants underline the outstanding research perspectives opened by our FAIR phase-0 program. With FAIR, we will be able to further expand the prospects of such groundbreaking research and enable important pioneering achievements.”

GSI and FAIR are also thrilled about the award of another ERC Advanced Grant to Professor Beatriz Jurado from the Centre Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan (CENBG), part of the French National Centre for Scientific Research CNRS. The experimental part of the project will be performed at GSI/FAIR.

Beatriz Jurado has been closely associated with GSI and FAIR for a long time through her nuclear physics research. Her main research areas are low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear reactions and fission. Already her doctoral thesis, which she defended at the University of Santiago de Compostela, was realized at the GSI's fragment separator FRS. She is also involved in the NUSTAR collaboration, one of the four major research pillars of FAIR, as a member of the Resource Board and was, among other things, a guest at GSI as “Visiting Professor” of the ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI.

In her EU-funded project entitled “Nuclear rEaCTions At storage Rings (NECTAR)” she wants to further advance the measuring capabilities in nuclear physics research. Her goal is to develop a new methodology to indirectly infer neutron-induced cross sections of unstable nuclei. These cross sections are essential for nuclear astrophysics, since most of the heavy elements in the Universe are produced by neutron-induced reactions in stars, and also for applications in nuclear technology. Her work is an experimental specification of the project of Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo.

“However, their measurement is very complicated as both projectile and target are radioactive. We will overcome these limitations by producing the nuclei formed in the neutron-induced reactions of interest with surrogate reactions involving radioactive heavy-ion beams and stable, light target nuclei. We will measure the decay probabilities for fission, neutron and gamma-ray emission of the nuclei produced by the surrogate reaction”, explained Beatriz Jurado. These probabilities provide precious information to constrain models and will enable much more accurate predictions of the desired neutron cross sections.

The experimental part of Beatriz Jurado´s project will be realized at the accelerator facility on the GSI/FAIR campus as part of FAIR Phase 0, using the storage rings ESR and CRYRING. Beatriz Jurado described: “The storage rings of GSI/FAIR are unique devices where revolving ion beams of outstanding quality repeatedly interact with ultra-thin, windowless gas-jet targets. We will take advantage of these exceptional features to measure decay probabilities of many unstable nuclei with unrivalled precision”.

Professor Paolo Giubellino is very delighted with the execution of the NECTAR project at the GSI/FAIR facility: “This underlines once more the attractiveness of our laboratory for the international research community and the quality of our research infrastructures already during FAIR Phase 0. We are very pleased that a renowned scientist like Beatriz Jurado will join us for her experimental research. This is also a great recognition for us".

The President of the European Research Council (ERC), Professor Mauro Ferrari, commented: “I am glad to announce a new round of ERC grants that will back cutting-edge, exploratory research, set to help Europe and the world to be better equipped for what the future may hold. That’s the role of blue sky research. These senior research stars will cut new ground in a broad range of fields, including the area of health. I wish them all the best in this endeavour and, at this time of crisis, let me pay tribute to the heroic and invaluable work of the scientific community as a whole.” (BP/IP)

More information

Press release of the European Research Council

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3624 Fri, 27 Mar 2020 09:52:00 +0100 Artistic impressions, drone flights over the construction site: GSI and FAIR invite to a virtual visit https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3624&cHash=c6069be13420a666e62d1a036a051770 One of our priorities at GSI and FAIR has always been to provide the public with exciting insights into our research facilities, programs and results, and demonstrating the progress made on the construction of FAIR. However, the new situation created by the spread of the corona virus requires new approaches also here. Public guided tours on the campus and to the visitor platform at the construction site cannot be offered at present. Therefore, GSI and FAIR have arranged a digital offer, which gives all ... One of our priorities at GSI and FAIR has always been to provide the public with exciting insights into our research facilities, programs and results, and demonstrating the progress made on the construction of FAIR. However, the new situation created by the spread of the corona virus requires new approaches also here. Public guided tours on the campus and to the visitor platform at the construction site cannot be offered at present. Therefore, GSI and FAIR have arranged a digital offer, which gives all interested people the opportunity to continue visiting us virtually and interactively.

For example, one can click through a selection of very special artistic impressions that were created during a visit of the group "Urban Sketchers Rhein-Main" at GSI and FAIR. More than 30 members of the group, which is part of an international network of artists, spent a day sketching and painting on campus in January. The result are numerous extraordinary views of our particle accelerators and experimental stations.

The mega construction project FAIR, one of the largest construction projects for research worldwide, can also be visited virtually. Visitors can fly over the FAIR construction site by drone flight, get to know its extraordinary dimensions and, for the first time, even dive into the large ring tunnel that will form the heart of the future accelerator center. In addition, a long-term drone lapse video was created using a new filming technique that shows the development of an entire year: With the help of GPS, several videos were superimposed, so that one can see the construction grow as if from one piece right before the eyes of the viewer, making the progress particularly tangible.

Furthermore, there is the opportunity delve into our history, for example to travel back in time by photo slider on the GSI and FAIR homepage: an interactive past-today-show in which the images virtually overlap and thereby illustrate how things used to look like on campus in the past and how they look like today. The results provide interesting insights, for example into the linear accelerator, the control room or the experimental halls.

An even more detailed tour through half a century is offered by the digital GSI timeline where highlights of the GSI history are presented. Users can click their way through 50 years of GSI, and take a look into the future of FAIR. Also the great scientific achievements such as the discovery of six new chemical elements or the development of a new type of tumor therapy using ion beams can be found there.

The main task of GSI and FAIR is to carry out cutting-edge research and to use the accelerator facilities to gain new insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe. A science film shows how scientists from all over the world can explore the universe in our laboratory.

If you want to take a virtual walk through the research facilities of GSI and FAIR and to stand directly next to the particle accelerators and detectors, it is best to get out your mobile phone to watch our 360° video in an optimized way. The exciting video was produced for the planetarium show "Dimensions - Once upon reality" at the Bochum Planetarium.

On all these digital and virtual routes, our guests are therefore still welcome to visit our research facilities and take a look at the FAIR construction site. Furthermore, GSI and FAIR of course offer the possibility to keep up to date and to stay in contact with us online on our homepage and on our social media channels. (BP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3622 Mon, 16 Mar 2020 11:00:00 +0100 Dr. Ulrich Breuer is the new Administrative Managing Director of GSI and FAIR https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3622&cHash=fa7e52bdb75e91e48b35b10db752a2d5 The science manager and physicist Dr. Ulrich Breuer has taken over the position of the Administrative Managing Director of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH) on 15 March 2020. He previously worked as Administrative Director at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR). The science manager and physicist Dr. Ulrich Breuer has taken over the position of the Administrative Managing Director of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH) on 15 March 2020. He previously worked as Administrative Director at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR).

Together with the Scientific Managing Director Professor Paolo Giubellino and the Technical Managing Director Jörg Blaurock, Dr. Ulrich Breuer will constitute the joint management team of GSI and FAIR. He succeeds Ursula Weyrich, who has changed to the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg as Administrative Director.

“GSI has been a synonym for cutting-edge research with worldwide reputation for decades, and with the future accelerator center FAIR, the international dimensions of research will be expanded in a future-oriented manner. I am looking forward to this responsible task and the opportunity to foster this development", says Dr. Ulrich Breuer. “I am very grateful for the trust placed in me.” He names as the most important goals a solid financial and personnel planning as well as the effective support of science with customized infrastructural and administrative conditions.

His two management colleagues, Professor Paolo Giubellino and Jörg Blaurock, are also looking forward to future cooperation in the management team and emphasize: “Dr. Breuer knows the profession very well and for a long time. He brings with him a broad knowledge of science management as well as of the administrative leadership of large research institutions." The aim is to conduct top-level research at the existing facility and to realize the future accelerator facility FAIR in international cooperation. “The decision in favor of Dr. Breuer is an excellent choice. With his many years of experience we will continue to successfully shape the future of GSI and FAIR together.”

Dr. Ulrich Breuer studied physics and received his doctorate at the Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen. His professional career began in 1991 at the Forschungszentrum Jülich. There he first worked as assistant to the Chairman of the Board of Directors and then in leading positions for many years.

In 2005, he changed to the Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin as Administrative Director, where he accompanied the merger with the Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung (BESSY) and the foundation of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin. He operated as its Administrative Director from 2009 to 2011.

From 2012 to 2017, he worked as Vice President Economics and Finance of the Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT). Subsequently he held the position of the Administrative Director at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf.

Until the end of June 2020, Dr. Breuer will continue in his current position at the HZDR in addition to his functions at GSI and FAIR. (BP)

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Presse Aktuelles FAIR
news-3620 Tue, 10 Mar 2020 08:45:00 +0100 Dr. Clémentine Santamaria receives FAIR-GENCO Young Scientist Award https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3620&cHash=e6d0177a9a4c4ecd71822cf79ffcdc6f This year's FAIR-GENCO Young Scientist Award goes to Dr. Clémentine Santamaria from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, USA. The award is presented by the GSI Exotic Nuclei Community (GENCO) and is endowed with 1,000 Euros. It is awarded annually to young researchers, who are at the begin of their scientific career. This year's FAIR-GENCO Young Scientist Award goes to Dr. Clémentine Santamaria from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, USA. The award is presented by the GSI Exotic Nuclei Community (GENCO) and is endowed with 1,000 Euros. It is awarded annually to young researchers, who are at the begin of their scientific career. The award was bestowed during a festive colloquium at FAIR and GSI by GENCO President Professor Christoph Scheidenberger (GSI/FAIR) and GENCO Vice President Professor Wolfram Korten (CEA-IRFU, Saclay, France) at the GENCO Annual Meeting in March. The awardee was chosen in a selection procedure by the international GENCO Jury, consisting of seven renowned nuclear physicists. In addition, three scientists as well as Jörg Blaurock, Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, were appointed as new members via the GENCO Membership Award.

Dr. Clémentine Santamaria received the Young Scientist Award and the GENCO Membership for her milestone achievements to answer long-standing questions of the evolution of shell structure far from stability and her striking expertise in both nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear reactions. Prior to her current postdoctoral position at Berkeley, she worked at the Japanese research center RIKEN and the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, USA, among others.

The GENCO Membership was awarded to:

  • Jörg Blaurock (Technical Managing Director of GSI and FAIR) for his outstanding accomplishments for the realization of the FAIR project, in particular the construction of the superconducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) and the NUSTAR facilities at FAIR.
  • Dr. Tuomas Grahn (scientists at Helsinki Institute of Physics and University of Jyväskylä) for his important findings of shape evolution and shape coexistence in the lead-polonium region and for his contributions to groundbreaking experiments on the excited structures of heavy nuclei all the way up to the nobelium region.
  • Dr. Helmut Weick (scientist at GSI) for his significant contributions to the design of the Super-FRS and to the development of simulation codes, which are based on his experimental results of heavy-ion stopping in matter, and for decisive contributions to a variety of experiments with exotic nuclei. (CP)
Further Information:

 

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news-3618 Fri, 06 Mar 2020 08:59:00 +0100 Looking into the future of quantum computing across industries https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3618&cHash=a26fc99ed0823f139a47dcc4119413cd Darmstadt isn’t just home to Merck’s global headquarters, it is a global science, technology and innovation hub. In fact, in 2019, it was again ranked as Germany’s No.1 “City of the Future” in terms of scientific innovation. In retrospect then, it’s no surprise that the recent Applied Quantum Conference was hosted by a collaborative syndicate of large science-focused organizations based in Darmstadt: ESA/ESOC, GSI/FAIR and Merck. This news is based on a publication of Merck KGaA.

Darmstadt isn’t just home to Merck’s global headquarters, it is a global science, technology and innovation hub. In fact, in 2019, it was again ranked as Germany’s No.1 “City of the Future” in terms of scientific innovation. In retrospect then, it’s no surprise that the recent Applied Quantum Conference was hosted by a collaborative syndicate of large science-focused organizations based in Darmstadt: the Operations Centre of the European Space Agency (ESA/ ESOC); the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (GSI/FAIR); and Merck, a vibrant science and technology company with more than 350 years of history. The conference focus was to discuss the coming paradigm shift in quantum technology. More specifically, the event aimed to identify quantum solutions to current and future needs, connect communities and facilitate interactions to foster future productive collaborations and solutions.

What is “Quantum”?

Quantum mechanics in physics is fundamentally about how molecules, atoms, or sub-atomic particles behave. Over the years, such particles have been observed to act in ways which are highly unexpected and difficult to explain using the established laws of classical physics. As a result, there are currently close to 20 different philosophical interpretations of what quantum behavior is, all valid in their respective applications. Companies like Merck are interested in quantum behavior as it applies in an industrial context. This includes how it can be used to approach challenges in Performance Materials, Life Science and Healthcare.

Specifically, it is hoped that Quantum Computing can address the limitations of traditional “digital”, computational methods and machine learning currently used to identify potential new materials and drugs, and their interaction with so-called drug targets. These methods are highly computationally intensive, if not impossible, and often rely on huge datasets to train the models. One promise of quantum computing is that it will significantly accelerate this process using so-called “qubits” instead of the traditional 0s and 1s of binary digital computing. A qubit can best be described as a vector pointing to a point on the surface of a sphere. Rotations of this vector and interactions with other vectors according to the laws of quantum mechanics can be used as encode calculations on quantum objects. However, it is currently neither clear how to use the algorithms for most real problems, nor possible to test the calculations because hardware with sufficient qubits does not yet exist. Nevertheless, the first interesting approaches for “quantum enhanced” computing are on the horizon.

The Applied Quantum Conference

It’s within this context that Darmstadt-based science leaders ESA/ESOC, GSI/FAIR and Merck organized the Applied Quantum Conference.  Held on February 4, 2020, it brought together very different sectors that are at the same time very similar in terms of the problems they face and are trying to solve.

“The first Applied Quantum Conference was extremely successful in bringing together experts for the application of quantum computing to many real-world challenges from different sectors. Exchanging the gained experiences showed several commonalities and unveiled the potential for common approaches to further increase the utilization of quantum computing. At GSI and the future international FAIR accelerator facility, which is currently under construction, we look forward to intensifying the existing collaboration with ESA and Merck in this and other fields,” said Dr. Tobias Engert, co-organizer and head of the Technology Transfer of GSI and FAIR.

The conference attracted a panel of highly distinguished speakers from Merck, ESA/ESOC and GSI/FAIR. In addition, top universities presented the very latest progress from their labs, and a select group of startups and established international firms demonstrated products and results at the very cutting edge of this technology landscape.

The Applied Quantum Conference was a spectacular collaborative showcase for a branch of scientific endeavor that could shape the progress of the 21st century. The three organizers, ESA/ESOC, GSI/FAIR  and Merck are very much looking forward to all the follow up activities that have been identified. (Merck/CP)

Further information:
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news-3616 Tue, 03 Mar 2020 09:58:46 +0100 Nuclear matter experts meet in Dresden https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3616&cHash=edbc3bb64fc82d3db78e941117c154d6 From March 2 to 6, 2020, the 38th HADES Collaboration Meeting will take place at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) with more than 80 participants from more than 20 institutes in nine European countries. At the meeting, the scientists will discuss the status of the HADES detector system for the planned use at the international accelerator FAIR and a roadmap for future measurements. This news is based on a news by Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR).

From March 2 to 6, 2020, the 38th HADES Collaboration Meeting will take place at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) with more than 80 participants from more than 20 institutes in nine European countries. At the meeting, the scientists will discuss the status of the HADES detector system for the planned use at the international accelerator FAIR and a roadmap for future measurements.

The international accelerator center FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) is currently being built at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt and is one of the largest research projects worldwide. Here, scientists from all over the world want to create matter in the laboratory that otherwise only occurs in the depth of space. They expect new insights into the structure of matter and the evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present.

One piece of the puzzle on the way and at the same time a major challenge for modern particle physics is to explain the origin of the masses of important components of matter. So-called hadrons (protons and neutrons) combine 99 percent of the mass of luminous matter in the universe. The same applies to our natural environment, in which protons and neutrons are largely bound in nuclei. To understand the phenomenon of the "mass of hadrons", scientists use different methods. One way is to study the decay products of particularly suitable hadrons in the environment of strongly interacting matter. These elementary particles, grouped together as vector mesons, are created in the collisions of heavy ions. However, scientists can also produce them in the laboratory by bombarding nuclei with elementary particles. Thus, nuclear physicists create strongly interacting matter with up to three times the nuclear density, at temperatures equivalent to 50,000 times the temperature inside the sun.

HADES: Know-how for precise hadron spectroscopy

The vector mesons produced in this way decay, among other things, into so-called lepton pairs, which are e. g. composed of electrons and positrons. But this is a relatively rare process. This is why the researchers need special detectors. This is where HADES (High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer) comes in. The detector is installed at GSI and calibrated to those electron-positron pairs that leave the surrounding strongly interacting matter almost undisturbed, thus providing direct access to the original mass of their initial hadrons.

HADES was developed in an international collaboration at the heavy ion synchrotron SIS18 at GSI, which has now been running for 25 years. The lively cooperation of around 100 scientists has resulted in an intensive transfer of knowledge in the field of particle physics — from Monte Carlo simulations and detector construction to fast front-end electronics and data analysis — which also benefits HZDR and has already manifested in almost 250 scientific publications.

The HZDR is extensively involved in HADES: Alone 12 of the 24 drift chamber detectors were manufactured in the HZDR detector laboratory, now the multifunctional laboratory. They are the centerpiece, which allows the precise measurement of the momenta of charged reaction products from the heavy ion impact. The results enable investigations of the equation of state of hot dense matter, comparable to the state in neutron stars. In this way, researchers obtain an unaltered view of the interior of highly compressed nuclear matter. At their meeting, the experts want to discuss previous results and future measurements at the heavy ion synchrotron SIS18 at GSI in the framework of the "FAIR Phase 0" research program and at the FAIR ring accelerator SIS100. (HZDR/CP)

Further information:

News of HZDR (German)

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Aktuelles FAIR
news-3614 Mon, 17 Feb 2020 13:00:00 +0100 FAIR experimental program: Research team analyses repair processes in radiation-damaged cells https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3614&cHash=6c7d900cf64189c72a0ed05103aae62c These are future-oriented research results, combining most advanced physics and biology and at the same time demonstrating the great potential of the future accelerator center FAIR: Scientists at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung have been able to observe the repair processes in human cells after radiation damage more directly and with higher resolution than ever before. A precise understanding of DNA repair mechanisms is of great importance, for example, for risk assessments during long-te These are future-oriented research results, combining most advanced physics and biology and at the same time demonstrating the great potential of the future accelerator center FAIR: Scientists at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung have been able to observe the repair processes in human cells after radiation damage more directly and with higher resolution than ever before. A precise understanding of DNA repair mechanisms is of great importance, for example, for risk assessments during long-term space missions.

For the radiation experiments at the accelerator facility on the GSI and FAIR campus in Darmstadt, high-energy ion beams, which are also characteristic of cosmic radiation in space, were used and combined with modern microscopy techniques. The investigations were carried out as part of the first stage of the FAIR experimental program, "FAIR Phase 0". The team of the GSI Biophysics Department has now published its results in the journal "Scientific Reports", which is edited by the Nature Publishing Group and which covers all areas of the natural sciences.

At the specially developed measuring station at the accelerator, the scientists irradiated established human cell cultures with heavy ions that cause double-strand breaks and thus damage the genetic information (DNA). During and immediately after irradiation, the research team was able to closely observe the dynamic processes of the induction of the damage and the subsequent repair processes in the genetically damaged cells using so-called "live cell imaging" on a specially constructed microscope directly at the accelerator beamline. For this purpose, the proteins responsible for repair in the cell were provided with fluorescent dyes so that they were visible under the microscope. The remote controlled arrangement made it possible to observe the protein dynamics in the cell core seamlessly and without interruption from the damage track to the biological response of the cell and to record it visually on film.

Particularly valuable for new fundamental insights into the repair processes in human cells is the possibility of using high energetic heavy ion beams to simultaneously generate simple and clustered DNA damage in the same cell and to investigate this damage in real time, which was previously possible only separately. In such a distribution of damage, many DNA double-strand breaks are concentrated along a densely ionizing damage path and only single, simple damages are off track. The researchers were thus able to observe parallel how the same cell reacts to complex damages and to single damages.

The results of the measurements show differences in this damage response: The DNA repair proteins seem to be recruited faster to the clustered damage than to the individual DNA damage outside the ion track. On the other hand, the delayed repair there seems to be faster and less difficult. Thus, the results clearly demonstrate the impact of the quality of DNA lesion on the dynamics of early radiation response and repair and indicate that simple and clustered DNA damage should be treated separately when assessing radiation effects.

Most precise fundamental knowledge about repair processes in cells also helps scientists to better understand the development of cancer. If DNA damage is repaired incorrectly, i.e. the repair of double-strand breaks does not function properly, the risk of cancer increases. The high-energy heavy ion radiation also corresponds to the cosmic radiation that astronauts are confronted with during long-term missions, for example to Mars. Therefore, research as carried out by GSI Biophysics is important for the most accurate and differentiated biological risk assessment in space travel.

The head of GSI Biophysics Department, Professor Marco Durante, stressed: "These are very innovative studies, only made possible by the high energies available in FAIR phase 0. By combining cutting-edge molecular biology with high-energy heavy ion physics, we were able to gain highly interesting knowledge, and the new technologies also enabled us to deliver outstanding visual research results".

The Scientific Managing Director of GSI and FAIR, Professor Paolo Giubellino, was also very pleased with these exciting results of the first stage of the FAIR experimental program and emphasized: “At the future accelerator center FAIR, which is currently being built at GSI, these possibilities will even be considerably expanded. FAIR will allow experiments with an even wider range of particle intensities and energies and will be able to simulate the composition of cosmic radiation with a precision that no other accelerator facility will be able to match”. (BP)

More information

Publication in Scientific Reports

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news-3612 Wed, 12 Feb 2020 10:30:00 +0100 Successful patenting and commercialization of green supercomputers "made in Hessen" https://www.gsi.de/en/start/news/details?tx_news_pi1%5Baction%5D=detail&tx_news_pi1%5Bcontroller%5D=News&tx_news_pi1%5Bnews%5D=3612&cHash=977cefe9dec8a4786f618961491de51e By 2030, data centres could be responsible for 13 percent of worldwide power consumption. In Frankfurt, the global network node with the highest data volume, data centres today already consume 20 percent of all local electricity – and this figure is rising. A large part of it is used for cooling power. Already today, the waste heat from single large-scale data centres could be used to heat up to 10,000 households. An answer to this global challenge comes from Goethe University and GSI. By 2030, data centers could be responsible for 13 percent of worldwide power consumption. In Frankfurt, the global network node with the highest data volume, data centers today already consume 20 percent of all local electricity – and this figure is rising. A large part of it is used for cooling power. Already today, the waste heat from single large-scale data centers could be used to heat up to 10,000 households. An answer to this global challenge comes from Hessen. To be specific, it comes from Goethe University and the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, which were recently granted a European patent for their concept for an energy-efficient cooling structure for large data centers.

This patent now paves the way for the commercialization of the pioneering technology developed by Professor Volker Lindenstruth, Professor Horst Stöcker and Alexander Hauser of e3c. Together with parallel patents outside Europe, the invention can now be put to economic use throughout the world. The team has already received enquiries from various countries for the construction of such large data centres.

The data center is thus becoming an important export commodity “made in Hessen”. This success is also thanks to Innovectis, Goethe University’s own transfer agency, and its managing director Dr Martin Raditsch, the driving force behind the invention’s commercialization, as well as the GSI departments Technology Transfer headed by Tobias Engert and Patents headed by Michael Geier. The successful commercialization of the patents is a perfect example of collaboration between a university and a major research facility in Hessen.

NDC Data Centers GmbH, a Munich-based company, has obtained the rights to market the green technology in data center construction projects around the globe and is thus also making a major contribution to the careful handling of our energy resources against the backdrop of global digitalization.

The basis for these activities is the visionary concept of a significantly optimized cooling system for large data centers with the highest possible level of energy efficiency, which was developed by Volker Lindenstruth, Professor for High-Performance Computing Architecture at Goethe University and former head of the Scientific IT Department at GSI.  On the basis of his concept, large data centers and commercial IT systems can today be operated with up to 50 percent less primary energy consumption in comparison to conventional data centers.

The technology has been in use for years and is being continuously improved: The first data center of this type was Goethe University’s own, which was set up in the Infraserv industrial park. Another very large data center, the Green IT Cube, was built by the GSI Helmholtzzentrum in Darmstadt and financed from funds provided by the German federal government and the Federal State of Hessen via Helmholtz expansion investments. The concept enables the realization and particularly efficient operation of data centers for large-scale research facilities such as FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research), which is currently being set up at the GSI. Later, the Green IT Cube will be the central data center for FAIR, one of the largest projects worldwide in support of research. Moreover, the waste heat from the servers in the Green IT Cube is already being used today to heat a modern office and canteen building on the GSI campus.

Apart from the high energy savings associated with the use of this new technology, the construction of such data centers is also extraordinarily cost-efficient, thus minimizing procurement and operating costs: An expedient coupling of ecology and economy.

Lindenstruth’s supercomputers have received several awards for their energy-efficient concept in recent years. At the end of 2014, one of his computers ranked first place in the global listing of the most energy-efficient supercomputers, thanks to its greatly optimized computer architecture.

Goethe University’s success in the area of green IT is also spurring on its current application, together with Mainz, Kaiserslautern and Saarbrücken, to host one of the new National High-Performance Computing Centers. Thanks to the optimized computer architecture based on the Hessian green IT approach, considerably more computing power could be made available to users at the same cost. Goethe University would therefore be an ideal location for one of the new centers.

Views on the green supercomputer technology

Angela Dorn, Hessen’s Minister of Science, says: “My sincere congratulations to Professor Lindenstruth and his team. I’m especially pleased that this success has been accomplished in a field close to my heart: The energy turnaround to which green IT can make a very important contribution. I’m also very happy that we as the Federal State of Hessen have contributed to this success. The first supercomputer in which Professor Lindenstruth used his energy-saving technology was the LOEWE-CSC at Goethe University’s data centre in the Infraserv industrial park. Hessen’s Ministry of Science supported this investment with a total of almost € 2 million in the shape of both direct funding as well as from the LOEWE programme. We’re therefore today harvesting together the fruits of this funding and the LOEWE programme launched in 2008.”

Professor Birgitta Wolff, President of Goethe University, says:Just as in Goethe’s days it made no sense to harness more and more horses in front of a stagecoach in order to increase the speed, so today we are facing a fundamental paradigm shift in IT. Back then, the railroad was the answer to the problem of speed. Today, the smart IT sector has a huge sustainability and energy problem. To satisfy its enormous hunger for data, our IT-based society requires new energy concepts for supercomputers that drastically reduce power consumption. Volker Lindenstruth from Goethe University has developed such a solution. Its successful patenting with the support of our subsidiary Innovectis is a major step in the right direction: The dissemination and commercialization of this truly smart technology.”

Professor Volker Lindenstruth, Professor for High-Performance Computing Architecture at Goethe University, says: “Our successful patent registration is a milestone for the further global commercialization of our “Green IT” approach. We’ve already received enquiries for it from various regions worldwide. This gives our work a further boost, the more so since with NDC we now have a strong business partner at our side to help with the practical steps.”

Professor Karlheinz Langanke, Research Director of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and FAIR – Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe, says: “The Green IT Cube high-performance computing center at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum is an outstanding example of how practical and usable know-how and developments evolve out of basic research. The Green IT Cube was developed for enormous volumes of measurement data from scientific research: It provides the highest computing capacities required and is at the same time extraordinarily energy-efficient and space-saving.”

Markus Bodenmeier, NDC co-founder and partner: “With the help of the innovations created by Professor Volker Lindenstruth from Goethe University and by the GSI, NDC Data Centers GmbH builds the most energy-efficient and resource-friendly data centers. In so doing, we can guarantee over the long term the benefits offered by the exponential growth of digitalization. We’re in keeping here with the current trend – all major cloud operators are at present keeping a very close eye on the impact of their activities on the environment.”

Other statements by experts involved

Dr Martin Raditsch, Managing Director of Innovectis GmbH, a subsidiary of Goethe University explains: “The application in practice of this technology is a very nice example of how results from basic research at the University and their transfer lead to technological solutions for societal challenges. Through our technology, the advancing digitalization of industry and society can be accomplished in a far more energy-saving way.”

Dr Tobias Engert, Director