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09.02.2011 | Copernicium - 15 years ago element 112 was discovered

G. Otto/GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung

Professor Sigurd Hofmann with two godparents of the element, Roland Koch and Eva Kühne-Hörmann

 

Element 112 was discovered by an international team of scientists headed by professor Sigurd Hofmann at GSI Helmholtzzentrum on February 9, 1996.

Copernicium is 277 times heavier than hydrogen and therefore the heaviest element officially recognized in the periodic table. It was produced at an over 100 m long accelerator at GSI, while the researchers fired charged zinc atoms onto a lead foil. The fusion of two atomic nuclei produced an atom of the new element 112.

The name Copernicium follows a longstanding tradition of choosing an accomplished scientist as eponym. Nicholas Copernicus's astronomical work was a starting point for our modern worldview, which states that the sun is the center of our solar system.
Follow the link to the YouTube video Copernicium - Periodic Table of Videos or learn more about the Creation of New Elements on GSI.de.


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Professor Sigurd Hofmann with two godparents of the element, Roland Koch and Eva Kühne-Hörmann
Professor Sigurd Hofmann, head of the international team of scientists discovering element 112 with two godparents of the element, Roland Koch, Minister President of Hesse and Eva Kühne-Hörmann, Hessian Minister for Science and Arts at the naming ceremony on July 12, 2010.
G. Otto/GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung