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The new accelerator facility FAIR is under construction at GSI. Learn more.

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Photo: Thomas Ernsting, HA Hessen Agentur GmbH
By 2030, data centres could be responsible for 13 percent of worldwide power consumption. In Frankfurt, the global network node with the highest data volume, data centres today already consume 20 percent of all local electricity – and this figure is rising. A large part of it is used for cooling power. Already today, the waste heat from single large-scale data centres could be used to heat up to 10,000 households. An answer to this global challenge comes from Goethe University and GSI.



Picture: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NCSU/M. Burkey et al.; Optical: DSS
A group of scientists, among them several from GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and from Technical University of Darmstadt, succeeded to experimentally determine characteristics of nuclear processes in matter ten million times denser and 25 times hotter than the centre of our Sun. A result of the measurement is that intermediate-mass stars are very likely to explode, and not, as assumed until now, collapse.



Image: ion42/FAIR
With the start of new year there is a change in the management of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH (FAIR GmbH). Ursula Weyrich, the previous Administrative Managing Director, moves to the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg where she takes over as Administrative Director.



Photo: T. Ernsting, HA Hessen Agentur
The GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung is celebrating 50 years of existence this year – five decades of research history with outstanding scientific successes and discoveries. During this time, GSI has developed from a national research institute with worldwide collaborations into an international campus with global relevance. Now, it is the 50th anniversary of the founding day of GSI, 17 December 1969.



Photo: T. Ernsting, HA Hessen Agentur
GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. It was founded in December 1969. The anniversary celebrations also included two very special activities: On the one hand, the ten favorite photos from five decades of GSI history were chosen. On the other hand, the current and former employees had the opportunity to submit their personal memories of their time at GSI as a short story. The results can now be seen in a public exhibition.



Photo: G. Otto, GSI
It was one of the greatest successes in fundamental research at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung and at the same time a moment that became a landmark in the history of the city of Darmstadt: that 9 November 1994 at 4.39 p.m., when for the first time the chemical element 110 was produced in the GSI particle accelerator. In the meantime, it is named after its place of discovery "darmstadtium".



GSI/FAIR/Intermedial Design
How was the periodic table created and do we already know all the elements that exist in the universe? An animated film by GSI and FAIR summarizes the history of the discovery of the elements: from the Ancient World to the creation of new elements at particle accelerator facilities such as GSI and FAIR. The year 2019 is proclaimed by the United Nations as the International Year of the Periodic Table, which celebrates its 150th anniversary this year.



Photo: Lars von der Wense, LMU München
Physicists have measured the energy associated with the decay of a metastable state of the thorium-229 nucleus. This is a significant step on the way to a nuclear clock which will be far more precise than the best of today’s atomic timekeepers.



Photo: Björn Lübbe, Wilhelmshavener Zeitung
As part of the International Year of the Periodic Table 2019, the Conference on the Chemistry and Physics of Heavy Elements (TAN) taking place in Wilhelmshaven, Germany from the 25th to the 30th of August, brought together the discoverers of new chemical elements in a unique historical gathering. Researchers from Germany, Russia and Japan, who have added new elements to the periodic table in recent years, met at the international congress.




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