The new accelerator facility FAIR is under construction at GSI. Learn more.

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Photo: GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung
These are future-oriented research results, combining most advanced physics and biology and at the same time demonstrating the great potential of the future accelerator center FAIR: Scientists at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung have been able to observe the repair processes in human cells after radiation damage more directly and with higher resolution than ever before. A precise understanding of DNA repair mechanisms is of great importance, for example, for risk assessments...



Photo: Thomas Ernsting, HA Hessen Agentur GmbH
By 2030, data centres could be responsible for 13 percent of worldwide power consumption. In Frankfurt, the global network node with the highest data volume, data centres today already consume 20 percent of all local electricity – and this figure is rising. A large part of it is used for cooling power. Already today, the waste heat from single large-scale data centres could be used to heat up to 10,000 households. An answer to this global challenge comes from Goethe University and GSI.



Copyright: G. Otto, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung
21 International Chemistry Olympiad participants took the opportunity to gain exciting insights into the research conducted at GSI’s Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, at the end of January. The young talents from Hesse and Thuringia were accompanied by the supervisors of the International Chemistry Olympiad (IChO) and former Chemistry Olympians.



Photo: G. Otto / GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung
The technology behind the FAIR project is unique and customized in many areas. In the large ring accelerator SIS100, the heart of the future accelerator center FAIR, various sophisticated magnets and entire magnet systems will ensure that the ion beam is precisely guided and focused. The quadrupole modules also belong to them. The first of Series (FoS) has now been completed and delivered to GSI.



Picture: FAIR/CDTI
The International Organising Committee of the Big Science Business Forum 2020 (BSBF2020) has accepted FAIR as the eleventh co-organising Big Science organisation. FAIR will send technical, scientific and administrative delegates to BSBF2020 in Granada from 6th to 9th October. BSBF2020 participants will get the chance to get in depth knowledge of FAIR's procurement plans and liaise with its technical representatives.



Photo and drawing: Sandra Schwark
With pencils, color palettes and other painting utensils the "Urban Sketchers Rhein-Main" were guests at GSI and FAIR. The motto of the international artist network, which is represented by regional groups all over the world, says: "We show the world, one drawing at a time” For this purpose the group members visit interesting places which they paint or draw. This time it was the world of fast ions and the universe in the lab that the "Urban Sketchers" focused on and captured on paper.



Photo: G. Otto, GSI
Recently, Laura Garavini, who is a Senator in the Italian parliament, visited FAIR and GSI. She was accompanied by Santi Umberti, SPD member of the Town Council of Darmstadt and chairman of the Committee for Business Development and Science of the city of Darmstadt.



Photo: University of Salerno
Perspectives and opportunities for future cooperation with the University of Salerno were the focus of a visit by Professor Paolo Giubellino, Scientific Director of FAIR and GSI. The aim is to intensify the scientific exchange between researchers. In order to promote scientific and technological cooperation between GSI/FAIR, the University of Salerno (UNISA) and the department of physics, a “Memorandum of Understanding“ (MoU) has now been concluded.



Photo: A. Zschau/GSI Helmholtzzenztrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH
Where does the world of atomic nuclei end? Scientists went further into the region of unstable elements than ever before. An experimental collaboration at the fragment separator of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung has for the first time detected potassium-31, an isotope with eight neutrons less than the stable potassium atom. An atomic nucleus that remote from stability has never been observed before. The results were published in the journal Physical Review Letters.




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