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The new accelerator facility FAIR is under construction at GSI. Learn more.

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Our favorite pictures from five decades

Our favorite pictures are chosen! About 500 people took part and voted on their favorites from 50 photos. Here you find the top ten photos with the most votes.

Apart from this website, the favorite pictures can also be experienced from 15 November to 20 December 2019 in the exhibition "50 Jahre GSI – Lieblingsfotos und Erinnerungen" in the foyer of the Konferenz- und Bürogebäudes West (KBW) on the GSI/FAIR campus as large-format photo prints. The exhibitions is open from Monday to Friday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. External guests are requested to bring an identification document with them for admission to the campus.

1st place

For high-energy research with the SIS18 particle accelerator, which can bring heavy ions up to 90 % of the speed of light, new detectors, such as FOPI (4Pi), a detector that covers almost the full solid angle, were put into operation in the 1990s. FOPI's aim was to investigate the hot, dense nuclear matter that is produced for a very short time in a high-energy heavy ion collision. It expands explosively and emits newly produced particles. FOPI was designed by an international collaboration of 13 institutes and operated at GSI until recently.

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FOPI detector
Photo: T. Ernsting, HA Hessen Agentur

2nd place

On the occasion of our Open House in 2017, this image was taken at an accelerator structure of our linear accelerator UNILAC. With around 11,000 visitors, the Open House was the largest event in the history of GSI and FAIR.

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Discovering UNILAC
Photo: C. Grau, GSI

3rd place

The HADES detector (High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer) is used to investigate hot dense nuclear matter in order to, among other things, solve the question of mass. It has not yet been determined why a proton has significantly more mass than its individual components. As a part of the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment the use of HADES will continue also at FAIR.

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HADES detector
Photo: T. Ernsting, HA Hessen Agentur

Places 4 – 10

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Place 4 – Storm troopers at HADES
Place 5 – Ion sources
Place 6 – Control room in 1975
Place 7 – Autumn impression
Place 8 – View into the UNILAC
Place 9 – UNILAC buncher
Place 10 – AGATA detector
Photo: G. Otto, GSI
Photo: J. Hosan, GSI
Photo: A. Zschau, GSI
Photo: A. Zschau, GSI
Photo: A. Zschau, GSI
Photo: A.Zschau, GSI
Photo: T. Ernsting, HA Hessen Agentur